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help with amount of rads and pump(s)

Last response: in Overclocking
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May 18, 2013 7:57:37 AM

hi started laying out a plan to put water-cooling in my nzxt phantom 410 and need alittle help determining how many rads and if 1 pump or 2 pumps is needed. I'll be cooling cpu,gpu,mobo,ram(purely for looks) and having 120 rad under the drice bay, and another on the back with a 240 rad up top. so i was wondering if that will be enough rads and will 1 pump (MCP655) do it?

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a b K Overclocking
May 18, 2013 8:25:33 AM

I would say an RX360 would be more than enough for all that and you only need 1 pump. 655 is a good pump I am using it to push liquid through an RX480 and RX240 and 3 blocks with no issues

What cpu and gpu are you plannign to cool? ( mainboard and ram don't add significant heat )
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May 18, 2013 8:46:15 AM

i5-3570k and right now it would 7970 but i was thinking of holding off a tad bit to see the new gtx 700 series if the 780 is above $600 then stick with 7970 and maybe add another 7970 or wait til the end of the year for amd 9000 series. the problem is i dont think i can fit a triple rad in my case thats y i kinda broke it down to 2 120 and a 240 but if i can the cleaner it would look.
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a b K Overclocking
May 18, 2013 5:16:03 PM

you would need to mod the case to fit a 360 rad.. but a 240 and a 120 should be fine and will run that setup fine. I recommend the RX series ( i use them ) and ek blocks
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a b K Overclocking
May 18, 2013 8:53:23 PM

The XSPC RAYSTORM is a good CPU block and the fans you use will have a large impact also.
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May 20, 2013 9:46:20 AM

XSPC Raystorm with the Aluminum Hold-Down Bracket would be my choice. Using the aluminum vs the included plexiglass hold-down resulted in a further 4C drop after de-lidding due to the much more even pressure it applies.

As for pumps, I personally recommend the MCP35X. It's tiny, like 1/4th the size of a D5, but has more pressure ("Head") and in anything but a "simple" loop will result in more flow. Also, it's PWM controlled so you don't have to stick your hand in your case to adjust pump speed.

GPU Blocks, I recommend Watercool Heatkiller and Aquacomputer AquagraFX/Kryographics blocks, above anything and everything else. I had two MSI Lightning R7970's killed by defective EK blocks (manufacturing defects that should have never made it out the factory), and quite simply Heatkiller and AC blocks perform the best!
I do recommend getting a backplate for your card, from whichever block manufacturer you choose, as the HK blocks on my 670FTW's weigh about 1Kg each (a solid piece of pure milled copper!).

As for radiators, rather than trying to shove a bunch of small radiators into your case and being limited significantly in the fans you can use (i.e. likely unable to fit push-pull, no 120x38mm fans, etc), why not go external? You can get a MO-RA3 1080 or 1260 for $150-240 depending on the options, and that's 9x120 or 9x140 worth of radiator! There's also the Phobya G-Changer 1080, which has a higher FPI and is 60mm thick, and works best if you can fit 18x 120x38mm fans in Push-Pull ("works best" meaning if you can use strong fans and/or push-pull, the Phobya tends to perform better than the MO-RA3 1080, but the 1260 MORA3 is a beast!).

External means easier maintenance, no limitation on rad surface area, and quite frankly much better bang-for-your-buck as you're getting ~$330-375 worth of rad space for around half the price. It also lets you achieve a better delta-T as you aren't reliant upon your case airflow to provide air to the radiators.
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