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Intel turbo boost useless function ?

Hi
I would like to know your opinion about Intel turbo boost technology, particularly in T models. From what I read, it's activated when the operating system requires the highest possible performance of the processor, increasing clock processor frequency, until power, thermal limit or maximum speed of active cores is reached. When any of these limits are reached or exceeded, the processor frequency will automatically be reduced until the processor is again operating within its limits.
So, to take advantage from Turbo Boost, the processor should not exceed either of these limits. Knowing that it's very difficult to control all of these factors at the same time, I think this feature will never work well, particularly in low TPD models ( 35W T models) and therefore is a useless function, as I've already checked in other analyzes, where they never reach the maximum turbo clock speed, because processor is "forced" to work within these termal parameters. So, what's the interests of this function in low TDP models ? Has anyone, in daily use, reached maximum clock speed at some of these T models ?
Look
http://ixbtlabs.com/articles3/cpu/intel-ci5-2390t-p1.html
I would like to know your opinion.

Thanks
10 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about intel turbo boost useless function
  1. half the job of intel is to sell the processor not just make it. its a selling point. a lot of the problem is not the chip either its how well the laptop manufacturer can keep the chip. its not intels fault that the laptop cant keep the chip cool.
  2. ok, cbrunnem, I agree that the responsibility of keeping the chip cool is from laptop manufacturer. But this is only one of the parameters. And the TDP is not manufacturer responsibility. And if it is exceeded, the turbo boost is turned off. 35W TDP today is easily reached, no? So, does it make sense to have turbo boost in 35W TDP cpu ?
  3. In many cases, Turbo Boost will only be required in short bursts, so the heat doesn't have time to build up much. And the T models are running at lowered clocks (even Turbo Clocks) which also reduces power consumption. So it's not useless... but perhaps a little less powerful.
  4. Best answer
    Turbo Boost and Thermal Throttling are 2 different functions of a CPU. Turbo Boost is a feature that mainly concearns power usage, there is no point of running a CPU @ 3,6 Ghz i.e if you idle on desktop or browse the internet. If you use an intensive CPU software that will bost your CPU to the max speed then its your job (or the OEM's job) to keep the CPU cool. Your job how? keep cooler dust free, have a very good airflow in the case etc etc. OME's job how? usualy in desktops the cooler is provided by the CPU manufacturer but in laptops the coolers are OEM designs . SO if you dont do your job or an OEM makes a bad cooler (less likely) then the CPU manufacturer says...OK, i will throttle down to save your CPU untill you realise that something is wrong.
    So basicaly Turbo Boost saves you money with a lower power bill and thermal throtling saves your CPU if you dont keep it cool enaugh.
    OK, people could say that Turbo Boost is not a power saver feature its the C states that do that. Yes, but the max turbo of a CPU is a C state aswell :)
  5. crisan_tiberiu said:
    Turbo Boost and Thermal Throttling are 2 different functions of a CPU. Turbo Boost is a feature that mainly concearns power usage, there is no point of running a CPU @ 3,6 Ghz i.e if you idle on desktop or browse the internet.

    Turbo Boost does have a certain thermal aspect in it. And it's not just about power usage. It's also about being flexible about software that doesn't stress all the available cores; making the stressed core(s) run faster when the other core(s) are idling.
  6. Sakkura said:
    crisan_tiberiu said:
    Turbo Boost and Thermal Throttling are 2 different functions of a CPU. Turbo Boost is a feature that mainly concearns power usage, there is no point of running a CPU @ 3,6 Ghz i.e if you idle on desktop or browse the internet.

    Turbo Boost does have a certain thermal aspect in it. And it's not just about power usage. It's also about being flexible about software that doesn't stress all the available cores; making the stressed core(s) run faster when the other core(s) are idling.

    My i7 2600k will boost to 3,8 Ghz / all cores unless i check in BIOS the "per core" option
  7. Low power cpus cost more, are lower performance, and for desktop cpus, there really aren't many uses for them. If your laptop has a low power cpu, then it probably is an ultrabook or tablet and shouldn't expect much performance anyways. You should realize that turbo was really for utilizing extra tdp headroom so is more of an efficiency feature rather than performance. As far as tdp goes, it can go above its tdp during turbo. Turbo really isn't a selling point and I'd suggest looking at base frequencies. But even then computer people really won't know that less ghz and less cores can actually have better performance than more cores and ghz. You could always get intel xtu which will usually work with any of their modern cpus and let you turn up the power.
  8. To provide some contrast, with my AMD A8-3520M, I am in TurboCore atleast 50% of the time, if not more.

    TurboCore/Boost is nothing more than a feature. It's not useless as it can be used, but as a feature, it shouldnt be relied on as if it were the sole purpose of the CPU.
  9. crisan_tiberiu said:
    My i7 2600k will boost to 3,8 Ghz / all cores unless i check in BIOS the "per core" option

    That's just because motherboard manufacturers are manipulating things; Intel didn't design Turbo Boost to work that way. And it would probably not be beneficial on a laptop anyway, since running at max. Turbo frequency with all cores loaded is just going to make temps spike until it has to throttle.
  10. Ok. After reading your opinions, I'm now convinced that turbo function is useful.
    Thanks
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