Solved

Mech Engineer building first gaming/simulation desktop

Hi everyone,

This is my first go at a legitimate gaming and workstation build for use at home.

Approximate Purchase Date: June 1st

Budget Range: Up to $1300 w/ OS and keyboard/mouse. Prefer closer to $1k.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming - Skyrim, WoW, Lotro, LoL. Productivity - R, Python monte-carlo simulations, Structural analysis (Abaqus), Dev environment for Python/Ruby/SQL, Pro/E, Creo

Are you buying a monitor: No, currently use 2 monitors, each 23'' and 1920x1200 or so

Do you need to buy OS: Yes, Prefer Windows 7

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg.com

Location: City, State/Region, Country - IL, USA

Parts Preferences: Intel CPU

Overclocking: Maybe, but prefer not to at purchase time.

SLI or Crossfire: No

Your Monitor Resolution: 1900x1200

Additional Comments: I would like to keep this build for 5-6 years and upgrade it once after ~3 years time to stay up to snuff with the newer games.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: RDP'ing from my laptop for real productivity software is no longer cutting it. Also, my laptop graphics card can barely run Skyrim at medium settings. Ouch.

Here's my proposed build (very rough). I'd like to take some cost out of the system, and I am unfamiliar with "compatibility" issues among hardware for gaming computers. Where's the best place to optimize my build? SSD is a must for the OS and my core games. I need the 16GB of RAM for simulation purposes.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/10sI7
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/10sI7/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/10sI7/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.69 @ Outlet PC)
Thermal Compound: Arctic Cooling MX-2 4g Thermal Paste ($4.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($114.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($124.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial M4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($186.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($62.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($359.99 @ NCIX US)
Wired Network Adapter: Intel EXPI9301CTBLK 10/100/1000 Mbps PCI-Express x1 Network Adapter ($27.99 @ Newegg)
Wireless Network Adapter: Rosewill RNX-N180UBE 802.11b/g/n USB 2.0 Wi-Fi Adapter ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Case Fan: Thermaltake AF0007 66.5 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.98 @ Outlet PC)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 650W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($64.00 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1338.47
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-27 14:14 EDT-0400)
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about mech engineer building gaming simulation desktop
  1. Here you go:


    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-2600 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($302.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus P8B75-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($106.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB Video Card ($168.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Rosewill CHALLENGER ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Cooler Master GX 450W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
    Total: $988.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-27 14:49 EDT-0400)


    Some 3D software lik 3ds Max require professional editions of Windows. So watch that.

    Windows 7 also won't be supported anymore, soon. Thus I was inclined to putting Windows 8 in, but never mind.

    Enjoy.
  2. well...
    1, I'd consider an i7, if I was serious about those simulations...
    2, your mobo already supports wifi and lan, so you can scratch those cards out...
    3, power supply - kinda overkill for a single card, great if you plan on pair the 670 in a near future...

    all in all a good build :D

    ps: I'd always recommend a dedicated sound card for any build over $1000, so, do yourself a favour and get a sound card from the money you save for those lan/wifi adapters. Asus Xonar (if you like music and movies) or Sound Blaster (if you're more into games)...
  3. X79 said:
    Here you go:


    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-2600 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($302.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus P8B75-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($106.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB Video Card ($168.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Rosewill CHALLENGER ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Cooler Master GX 450W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
    Total: $988.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-27 14:49 EDT-0400)


    Some 3D software lik 3ds Max require professional editions of Windows. So watch that.

    Windows 7 also won't be supported anymore, soon. Thus I was inclined to putting Windows 8 in, but never mind.

    Enjoy.


    Thank you for the input - and from doing a bit more research, yah, it seems the i7 is the way to go for the processor. Windows 8 is likely a necessary evil nowadays too, so I'll tack that on in the professional version as a long-term solution.

    What about the GPU - what kind of hit am I going to take going to the Asus GeForce GTX 650 Ti from a GTX 670? I don't play terribly graphics intensive games so I'm assuming it won't be terrible, but give me a sense of what I'm loosing or gaining here if possible.

    Thanks again.
  4. Best answer
    Well you said up to 1300$, so it won't have to be an issue:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-2600 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($302.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus P8B75-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($106.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($62.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($359.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Cooler Master Elite 431 Plus (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 500W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($34.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
    Total: $1197.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-27 15:07 EDT-0400)
  5. X79 said:
    Well you said up to 1300$, so it won't have to be an issue:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-2600 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($302.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus P8B75-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($106.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($62.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($359.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Cooler Master Elite 431 Plus (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 500W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($34.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
    Total: $1197.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-27 15:07 EDT-0400)


    Hehe. I like the way you work. Good point :)

    Thanks for everyone help, I'm going to make the purchase this week. Any more comments on the 650 Boost vs the 670 are appreciated.
  6. Thank you for the compliments.

    You can go on to add in any number of fans as you see fit.

    Just search your case and you'll find out how many and which kinds of fans it supports.

    The boost is a powerful midrange card. But since you can get a 670 anyway, it's pointless comparing.

    In fact, if you stretch just a little more (although some would argue a 670 performs the same as this one)

    you can get a GTX 680 even:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-2600 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($302.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus P8B75-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($106.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($62.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card ($409.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Cooler Master Elite 431 Plus (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 500W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($34.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
    Total: $1247.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-27 15:28 EDT-0400)

    Though you'd best upgrade the PSU a bit I guess. Still, nothing wrong what you've selected. Now you just need

    your gaming mouse and mechanical keyboard. Best keep the other build.
  7. Im looking to do a similar build myself, but slightly more gaming oriented at the moment.
    I was just wondering if theres a reason for your preference of Intel CPU?

    Also to the other replies, is there a reason to go NVIDIA over AMD?

    Thanks!
  8. Rival Son said:
    Im looking to do a similar build myself, but slightly more gaming oriented at the moment.
    I was just wondering if theres a reason for your preference of Intel CPU?

    Also to the other replies, is there a reason to go NVIDIA over AMD?

    Thanks!


    Well without starting a flame war...

    Nvidia currently holds both the first and second top spots for single GPU performance.

    Nvidia traditionally also have better driver support for SLI.

    There's just a lot of good things really.

    It's not that AMD is bad however. They've got powerful cards too and Nvidia still can't

    beat their "Never Settle" package, where you get X amount of games with your GPU.

    AMD tends to compete by slashing its prices on its GPUs. Hence they're good if you want

    power, but at a cheaper price point. AMD GPUs are also just plain superior to Nvidias at

    certain tasks. You could start your own thread on this. Just remember to give people a

    budget.
Ask a new question

Read More

Gaming Desktops Productivity Build Your Own Systems Skyrim