Solved

High End 7950 vs. Low End 7970

Sapphire Vapor-X or the PowerColor 7970?

It's to my understanding that the Vapor-X is one of the better 7950s. I don't know much about this specific 7970, but it is much cheaper than most of them. They both include 4 free games w/ purchase.

However, the 7970 is 40$ more expensive. I can fit it in my budget, but would the money be better spent elsewhere?
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about high end 7950 low end 7970
  1. Best answer
    High end 7950 every time. The AMD cards run hot and you really do not want a reference/crappy cooler on one.

    I'd suggest a look at the HIS 7950, either one, both are excellent, there is a reference one but avoid that. A 7950 with a good cooler should end up faster than a 7970 with a bad cooler, assuming you overclock. Likelihood is you'll get annoyed with the noise from a crap cooler and not want to overclock it very far.
  2. cookybiscuit said:
    High end 7950 every time. The AMD cards run hot and you really do not want a reference/crappy cooler on one.

    I'd suggest a look at the HIS 7950, either one, both are excellent, there is a reference one but avoid that. A 7950 with a good cooler should end up faster than a 7970 with a bad cooler, assuming you overclock. Likelihood is you'll get annoyed with the noise from a crap cooler and not want to overclock it very far.


    I figured as much. Can you explain to me what a reference GPU or cooler is? I see that often, but I don't know what it means.
  3. If this is a gaming rig, then no, the money is not better spent elsewhere. The way the 7970s are priced nowadays puts their price-to-performance right in line with the 7950s.
  4. PomuM said:
    cookybiscuit said:
    High end 7950 every time. The AMD cards run hot and you really do not want a reference/crappy cooler on one.

    I'd suggest a look at the HIS 7950, either one, both are excellent, there is a reference one but avoid that. A 7950 with a good cooler should end up faster than a 7970 with a bad cooler, assuming you overclock. Likelihood is you'll get annoyed with the noise from a crap cooler and not want to overclock it very far.


    I figured as much. Can you explain to me what a reference GPU or cooler is? I see that often, but I don't know what it means.


    The reference model of a card is the version of that card designed by either NVidia or AMD. For example, this is a reference 7970 (sold by Sapphire, but still reference design)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102961
    and here are two of Sapphire's non-reference cards.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202008
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202001
  5. leoweisman said:
    PomuM said:
    cookybiscuit said:
    High end 7950 every time. The AMD cards run hot and you really do not want a reference/crappy cooler on one.

    I'd suggest a look at the HIS 7950, either one, both are excellent, there is a reference one but avoid that. A 7950 with a good cooler should end up faster than a 7970 with a bad cooler, assuming you overclock. Likelihood is you'll get annoyed with the noise from a crap cooler and not want to overclock it very far.


    I figured as much. Can you explain to me what a reference GPU or cooler is? I see that often, but I don't know what it means.


    The reference model of a card is the version of that card designed by either NVidia or AMD. For example, this is a reference 7970 (sold by Sapphire, but still reference design)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102961
    and here are two of Sapphire's non-reference cards.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202008
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202001


    How do you know when it is a reference design?
  6. cookybiscuit said:
    High end 7950 every time. The AMD cards run hot and you really do not want a reference/crappy cooler on one.

    I'd suggest a look at the HIS 7950, either one, both are excellent, there is a reference one but avoid that. A 7950 with a good cooler should end up faster than a 7970 with a bad cooler, assuming you overclock. Likelihood is you'll get annoyed with the noise from a crap cooler and not want to overclock it very far.


    I believe this is the HIS 7950 you were talking about. If it is, I'll probably be going with this one.
  7. PomuM said:
    leoweisman said:
    PomuM said:
    cookybiscuit said:
    High end 7950 every time. The AMD cards run hot and you really do not want a reference/crappy cooler on one.

    I'd suggest a look at the HIS 7950, either one, both are excellent, there is a reference one but avoid that. A 7950 with a good cooler should end up faster than a 7970 with a bad cooler, assuming you overclock. Likelihood is you'll get annoyed with the noise from a crap cooler and not want to overclock it very far.



    I figured as much. Can you explain to me what a reference GPU or cooler is? I see that often, but I don't know what it means.


    The reference model of a card is the version of that card designed by either NVidia or AMD. For example, this is a reference 7970 (sold by Sapphire, but still reference design)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102961
    and here are two of Sapphire's non-reference cards.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202008
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202001


    How do you know when it is a reference design?


    From my experiences the reference designs are cheaper, and if multiple resellers are selling identical cards, it is a reference card. I'm not as certain about how the Nvidia cards look, but most of the Radeon reference cards (at least the 7000 series) look something like this http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image//skymtl/GPU/HD7870/HD7870-8.jpg . The non-reference cards usually have better cooling and stock OC, but the reference cards are better if you want to include your GPU in a water loop.
  8. leoweisman said:
    PomuM said:
    leoweisman said:
    PomuM said:
    cookybiscuit said:
    High end 7950 every time. The AMD cards run hot and you really do not want a reference/crappy cooler on one.

    I'd suggest a look at the HIS 7950, either one, both are excellent, there is a reference one but avoid that. A 7950 with a good cooler should end up faster than a 7970 with a bad cooler, assuming you overclock. Likelihood is you'll get annoyed with the noise from a crap cooler and not want to overclock it very far.



    I figured as much. Can you explain to me what a reference GPU or cooler is? I see that often, but I don't know what it means.


    The reference model of a card is the version of that card designed by either NVidia or AMD. For example, this is a reference 7970 (sold by Sapphire, but still reference design)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102961
    and here are two of Sapphire's non-reference cards.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202008
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202001


    How do you know when it is a reference design?


    From my experiences the reference designs are cheaper, and if multiple resellers are selling identical cards, it is a reference card. I'm not as certain about how the Nvidia cards look, but most of the Radeon reference cards (at least the 7000 series) look something like this http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image//skymtl/GPU/HD7870/HD7870-8.jpg . The non-reference cards usually have better cooling and stock OC, but the reference cards are better if you want to include your GPU in a water loop.


    Yeah I thought it was those. Alright, thank you very much!
Ask a new question

Read More

PowerColor Graphics