GPU changing clock speed when overclocking?

When I overclock my GPU (GTX 570) by adding about 100 to it's voltage, 200mhz ram speed and 170mhz ram speed, while gaming, the clock speeds gets really funky. Here's what I'm getting: http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/805/capturehn.jpg/
It ran smoothly when it was on clock speeds, I'm trying to play Crysis 2 on high (mind you it ran smoothly when it was on factory clock) and I'm blowing an external fan from behind my computer to cool the card. Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong and how I could fix this. I'm using EVGA precision X.
10 answers Last reply
More about gpu changing clock speed overclocking
  1. Can you lower the voltage without running into any further issues?
  2. Looks fine to me.
    Completely normal for a GPU to change it's clock speeds accordingly to performance requirements. You can think of it as the GPU equivalent of Intel's SpeedStep.
  3. -Jackson said:
    Looks fine to me.
    Completely normal for a GPU to change it's clock speeds accordingly to performance requirements. You can think of it as the GPU equivalent of Intel's SpeedStep.


    Playing a non-graphically intensive game Like 2K13 had the same clock speed all throughout playing time, but a game like Crysis 2 kep rising and dropping. Am I to expect this from more graphically demanding games?
  4. That temperature graph looks really high. How are your load temps?
    It could be thermal throttling.
  5. Actually, taking a second look at the picture, smeeze's suspicions could be spot-on.
  6. smeezekitty said:
    That temperature graph looks really high. How are your load temps?
    It could be thermal throttling.


    I'm not sure why my card hates crysis 2 then. Playing Hitman Absolution and far cry 3 with the same overclocking the card didn't get too hot.
  7. As a rule of thumb, don't add voltage. Try overclocking your card without increasing the voltage first and see how far you can go. Also 500-series cards run pretty incredibly hot.
  8. hizodge said:
    As a rule of thumb, don't add voltage. Try overclocking your card without increasing the voltage first and see how far you can go. Also 500-series cards run pretty incredibly hot.

    I can vouch for this. Running 3 GTX 580s. They make very nice hand warmers though. :D
  9. hizodge said:
    As a rule of thumb, don't add voltage. Try overclocking your card without increasing the voltage first and see how far you can go. Also 500-series cards run pretty incredibly hot.


    Yeah it's crazy, I've seen a 770 and it was running at 35 degrees. Well either way, my house is fairly cool during the summer; living in the Bay area of California you get a nice breeze :)
  10. -Jackson said:
    hizodge said:
    As a rule of thumb, don't add voltage. Try overclocking your card without increasing the voltage first and see how far you can go. Also 500-series cards run pretty incredibly hot.

    I can vouch for this. Running 3 GTX 580s. They make very nice hand warmers though. :D


    Seeing as you live in Australia, you must have it nice right now with those warmers :3. Living in California is no easy task if you're weak to the heat (especially if you're a pussy like me), I need to turn the AC on and two fans to keep my room and PC cool. But I can't wait to see how winter treats me with the cards! :) thanks for your reply by the way!
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