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new system: Haswell based or Ivy Bridge based with upgrade to Ivy Bridge E ?

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June 1, 2013 5:21:28 PM

Hello. I'm building a new system that will be used for basic stuff (MS Office, Internet browsing, movies, video and photo watching) and GAMING.

I will be using two GTX 780 on SLI. I know there is no such thing as "future proof" but would like a rig that is going to be able to play all the future games two years from now, including the next-gen games that are to come in near months because of the PS4/XBOX ONE release.

One alternative is buying the new 4770K CPU with a new 1150 motherboard and the other alternative is buying a "temporary" CPU like the 3930 with a 2011 motherboard and then make the jump and substitute said CPU with a newer Ivy Bridge E CPU.

Which system configuration would be better to me and be more "future proof" in terms of a 2 year span?

Is it true there is a risk that the new Ivy Brigde E could have a new chipset making any current Ivy Bridge based system useless to update to the E?

Any more suggestions or pros/cons between this two possible systems?

Thank you very very much for your help on this matter!
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June 1, 2013 5:38:02 PM

sonic123 said:
Hello. I'm building a new system that will be used for basic stuff (MS Office, Internet browsing, movies, video and photo watching) and GAMING.

I will be using two GTX 780 on SLI. I know there is no such thing as "future proof" but would like a rig that is going to be able to play all the future games two years from now, including the next-gen games that are to come in near months because of the PS4/XBOX ONE release.

One alternative is buying the new 4770K CPU with a new 1150 motherboard and the other alternative is buying a "temporary" CPU like the 3930 with a 2011 motherboard and then make the jump and substitute said CPU with a newer Ivy Bridge E CPU.

Which system configuration would be better to me and be more "future proof" in terms of a 2 year span?

Is it true there is a risk that the new Ivy Brigde E could have a new chipset making any current Ivy Bridge based system useless to update to the E?

Any more suggestions or pros/cons between this two possible systems?

Thank you very very much for your help on this matter!


I'll put my life on the line that they're making a new socket for IB-e.

I'd buy the 4770k. But I'd REALLY just wait untill IB-e is released.
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June 1, 2013 5:46:07 PM

I don't know about a new socket for IB-E, but if you look at the 2500K still being beautiful for gaming, I'd say you have no need to go above an i5-4670K. OTOH, new consoles have 8 x86 cores, so the extra threads on the i7 might become useful.

To cut a long story short, you won't need a LGA2011 chip for gaming for a long time.
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June 1, 2013 5:50:03 PM

For my needs basically I would be better if I go with the Haswell system configuration?
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June 1, 2013 5:54:33 PM

Someone Somewhere said:
I don't know about a new socket for IB-E, but if you look at the 2500K still being beautiful for gaming, I'd say you have no need to go above an i5-4670K. OTOH, new consoles have 8 x86 cores, so the extra threads on the i7 might become useful.

To cut a long story short, you won't need a LGA2011 chip for gaming for a long time.


+1. LGA 2011 is a massive waste of money for the OP's needs.

If you want to hedge your bets, you pick up an i7 3770/4770 (k or not, depending on whether you want to overclock). The chances that games will become multi-threaded enough in the next two or three years to take full advantage of a six-core (12 thread) i7 are remote to the point of irrelevance.

And the OP doesn't appear to have any interest in other (non-gaming) multi-threaded tasks. Hell, you can browse the internet, use MS Office, watch movies, and so on with a 6-year-old CPU. Based on what the OP's said, gaming is by far the most demanding thing he's interested in doing.
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June 1, 2013 5:56:52 PM

sonic123 said:
For my needs basically I would be better if I go with the Haswell system configuration?


Based on the benchmarks I've seen, it shouldn't matter much. If you're interested in overclocking, you might even be better off with Ivy, but that's just a preliminary impression of mine based on early reviews of Haswell.

As a general principle, I'd say you're better off going with the newer platform, but there aren't huge performance (or even qualitative) differences either way in this case.
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June 1, 2013 6:09:02 PM

Correct me if I'm wrong but as in both configurations for my needs I won't notice substantial differences, the best bet would be to go with the Haswell system because of being the newer one and one would never know if in the upcoming years some games or applications will use some of the new instructions of Haswell that the "old" based Ivy Bridge E won't have?
Besides, my main risk, as I see it, is if the upcoming Ivy Bridge E uses a new chipset: the Ivy Bridge based system I would be buying now will become instantly "dead" in terms of future improvement where as the Haswell based motherboard could have more future. Isn't it so?
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June 1, 2013 6:38:30 PM

sonic123 said:
Correct me if I'm wrong but as in both configurations for my needs I won't notice substantial differences, the best bet would be to go with the Haswell system because of being the newer one and one would never know if in the upcoming years some games or applications will use some of the new instructions of Haswell that the "old" based Ivy Bridge E won't have?
Besides, my main risk, as I see it, is if the upcoming Ivy Bridge E uses a new chipset: the Ivy Bridge based system I would be buying now will become instantly "dead" in terms of future improvement where as the Haswell based motherboard could have more future. Isn't it so?


Yeah, that's a pretty fair summary I think.

I'd buy Haswell, all else being equal. But if you can get a significantly better deal on, say, an i7 3770 (or 3770k), and you want to build the system right now, the difference between what you get and what Haswell offers ain't gonna kill you. As of right now, we're talking a performance difference of ~5-10%, assuming clocks are equal.
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