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What's the difference between the intel H87 and Z87 Chipest?

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June 2, 2013 10:46:58 AM

What's the difference between the intel H87 and Z87 Chipest? im building a Single Gpu gaming rig, with a gtx 770 and a new haswell I5, now while im looking for a motherboard i noticed that there is a H87 and a Z87, chipest, could anybody please explain to me the difference?
thanks lads
June 2, 2013 10:48:35 AM

Usually in any generation, the Z means for unlocked CPUs to overclock. By unlocked CPU's I mean the "K" models. The Z87 board is not worth the premium to get if you do not have an unlocked CPU as you won't be able to use the features you are paying premium for.
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June 2, 2013 11:01:59 AM

Z87 also supports splitting the 16 PCIe 3.0 lanes into x8/x8 or x8/x4/x4 for Crossfire or SLI.
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June 4, 2013 4:25:27 PM

SR-71 Blackbird said:
http://www.pugetsystems.com/blog/2012/04/12/z68-z77-and...

77 version , but read for a better picture ^


We actually have a new article up that is specifically for the new 8-series chipsets: http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Z87-H87-H81-Q... . In a nutshell though, Z87 has CPU overclocking and can run triple (3 GPU) SLI/Crossfire while H87 lacks CPU overclocking and can only do run normal (2 GPU) SLI/Crossfire configurations.

However, one thing we ran into when choosing what boards to offer our customers is that H87 boards tend to have fewer port options and worse board layout in general. So even if you don't need triple SLI/Crossfire or CPU overclocking, don't count out a Z87 board. It may be more expensive, but if you need a certain number or type of port it is better to get a board that has them built in rather than using PCI-E cards.
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June 12, 2013 12:33:04 PM

So basically, if shopping for an H87 board for a mid-to-high gaming rig, make sure it has a good board layout and plenty of appropriate ports? What would be things to look out for in terms of bad board layout?

PS-Matt said:
SR-71 Blackbird said:
http://www.pugetsystems.com/blog/2012/04/12/z68-z77-and...

77 version , but read for a better picture ^


We actually have a new article up that is specifically for the new 8-series chipsets: http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Z87-H87-H81-Q... . In a nutshell though, Z87 has CPU overclocking and can run triple (3 GPU) SLI/Crossfire while H87 lacks CPU overclocking and can only do run normal (2 GPU) SLI/Crossfire configurations.

However, one thing we ran into when choosing what boards to offer our customers is that H87 boards tend to have fewer port options and worse board layout in general. So even if you don't need triple SLI/Crossfire or CPU overclocking, don't count out a Z87 board. It may be more expensive, but if you need a certain number or type of port it is better to get a board that has them built in rather than using PCI-E cards.


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June 12, 2013 2:14:59 PM

Bear in mind the B85 chipset actually tends to be the best budget choice if you're not getting Z87. H87 only has minor advantages over B85, and will usually cost more. H81 makes some more substantial sacrifices.
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July 16, 2013 9:18:39 PM

On H87 you can crossfire AMD graphics cards, but not SLI Nvidea graphics cards. On Z87 you can do both
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July 17, 2013 5:00:59 AM

pattym said:
On H87 you can crossfire AMD graphics cards, but not SLI Nvidea graphics cards. On Z87 you can do both

That's just because Crossfire supports x4 slots. It's still going to hurt performance.
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February 25, 2014 2:44:54 PM

http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Z87-H87-H81-Q...
Quote:
H87 The H87 chipset is very similar to Z87, but lacks a few important features including CPU overclocking. While this chipset can easily handle SLI/Crossfire configurations by allowing the 16 PCI-E lanes from the CPU to be divided into either a single x16 slot or dual x8 slots, it does not support triple SLI/Crossfire configurations.

Like Z87, H87 supports Rapid Storage Technology, Smart Response Technology (otherwise known as SSD Caching), six SATA 6Gb/s ports and six USB 3.0 ports. Unlike Z87, it adds Small Business Advantage support, but removes support for Lake Tiny (SSD caching performance and power optimization). Finally, it supports two DIMMs per memory channel so it will be able to utilize up to four sticks of RAM.

H87 provides most of the same features as Z87 including plenty of SATA 6Gb/s and USB 3.0 ports. The only major features it lacks is CPU overclocking support and support for triple SLI/Crossfire configurations. Unfortunately, many motherboard manufactures attempt to push users to Z87 motherboards by limiting the number of ports and headers on their H87 motherboards. Because of this, Z87 motherboards are sometimes a better choice than H87 even when you do not need overclocking or triple SLI/Crossfire.


There are some very smart people who do nothing else but think sh** up, who have people who think sh** up to back them up, who have other people who think sh** up to back them up. So why when one of those people actually writes something down, people who don't know sh** argue with them...

I read this article, on advice from a smart person, and I found it both informative and fascinating and most definitely educational. it did leave me a little confused, though, as Asrock seems to claim their H-87 Fatality Performance mobo seems to support extreme overclocking
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February 25, 2014 4:37:42 PM

ah hah, so Asrock is snagged, but they still advertise... tut tut tut...
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February 25, 2014 4:41:40 PM

Some of the others did the same, briefly
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February 25, 2014 4:46:12 PM

That would tick me off, buy a cheaper oc version of a more expensive board.. only to get smacked the first time Microsoft updated, which incidentally was the first website I went to
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February 25, 2014 4:47:43 PM

you should get permission, then sticky that article. might solve some issues
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February 26, 2014 6:32:25 AM

That article from Puget Systems is wrong on one count, though. H87 does NOT support splitting the 16 PCIe 3.0 lanes into x8/x8. You would need a secondary PLX chip for that on an H87 board, which is not going to be worth it compared to just putting a Z87 chipset in the same board.

Source: Intel.com

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