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XMP profile in BIOS

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June 5, 2013 5:26:08 PM

I am still deciding between 1866 Mhz and 1600 Mhz memory. On Corsair web site it says, "Vengeance Pro Series memory is optimized for performance on the latest 3rd and 4th generation Intel® Core™ platforms. XMP 1.3 profile support makes stable overclocking easy and automatic."

I looked at XMP profile in my BIOS. I see XMP profile 1 and 2, under 1 it shows my memory specs (16000 and so on), nothing under 2, but there is no option to enable or disable anything or set any memory speed. I am under Tools (Asus motherboard). All numbers are written permanently, nothing to change. So if I buy 1866 Mhz, where would I change it and what? Thank you.

More about : xmp profile bios

June 5, 2013 5:34:37 PM

1866 Mhz and 1600 Mhz memory < You won't notice the difference , go with the one that is the best value.
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June 5, 2013 5:43:17 PM

Right... I think so too, as I doubt I would feel it. Also I was just wondering how XMP profile works.
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June 5, 2013 5:58:42 PM

It's a preset speed profile for your ram.Gives the best performance when used.Some motherboards will auto select it when installed.Sometimes it has to be manually set in the BIOS.
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June 5, 2013 6:55:33 PM

I was told that it was a question of enabling it. I see nothing to enable or install- it just shows numbers.
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June 5, 2013 7:00:58 PM

Astralv said:
I was told that it was a question of enabling it. I see nothing to enable or install- it just shows numbers.


Basically you have to "overclock" your RAM, although it isn't actually overclocking it because it is designed to run at that specific speed and timings. You just see what the XMP timings are and then enter them manually along with the speed into your BIOS and boom! Instant stable OC
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June 5, 2013 7:03:55 PM

Thank you for your reply, and I already ordered 16000. I found memory frequency section in BIOS. It set to Auto now (on my other computer), but let me set it from 800 Mhz up to 3200 Mhz. So if this is all it takes- it looks easy to enable any speed. I could of get any speed? On Auto- is it only able to be up to 1600, even if it is higher?
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June 7, 2013 10:10:33 PM

When you first install a new set of sticks on INtel they should load and boot to the mobos default freq generally 1333 or 1600. Then if the sticks are 1600 or better they should be XMP compliant. So you can go into the BIOS and enable XMP - XMP allows for a couple of profiles to be loaded into the SPD of the sticks, but it's not required which is prob why you only see one Profile. The current norm with newer sticks if for Profile 1 to be basically a fail safe set of timings for the specified freq well say as an example 9-9-9-24, Profile 2 is generally aimed towards enthusiasts and are a little more performance oriented, however that can be deceiving, you might look at profile 2 and it may also show 9-9-9-24 and you might think WTF! However, if the BIOS is good and you boot into Profile 1 and take a look in the BIOS you might find a CR of 2, whereas in Profile 2 the CR might be 1, you might see slightly different system voltages from Profile 1 to 2, you may see changes to the Advanced/secondary timings of the DRAM like in the tRC, tRFC, tWRD timings etc... with some older sets the two profiles might break down as to Profile 1 accommodating XMP ver 1.3 and Profile 2 accommodating XMP ver 1.2. Hope this help you and others understand.
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June 8, 2013 5:37:36 PM

I think I understand what it means- 2 profiles. It just that profiles do not have any options to change any settings. The Mhz section where I can change frequencies is in another section of MoBo, and it does not have any timing options.
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June 8, 2013 6:09:45 PM

Once XMP is enabled - you can then look at timings, voltages etc and on most mobos, can simply manually change a setting - this is really needed with higher density and freq DRAM as many (if not most BIOSs aren't really tuned for the higher freq/density sticks - have to keep in mind the sticks have profiles YES< but all they have is information in that SPD - it's up to the BIOS to take and implement the info and very few mobos are released that are really 'ready to go', the mobo manufacturers rush to get the mobos out, so they slap a QVL together that simply says 'these sets work', problem is they aren't tested with XMP enabled - they test at the mobos default (generally 1333 or 1600) which is why all to often folks complain that their high end sticks don't work - then as folks complain the mobo manufacturers do updats to the BIOS (interesting note - you seldom see DRAM mentioned in the BIOS update summaries - but all to often about 60% or more of a BIOS update is for DRAM setup). I wrote an article on this that is over at Benchmarkreviews

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
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