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LAN speed will not go above 10 Mbps (even with new NIC that works elseware)

Last response: in Networking
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June 5, 2013 8:54:23 PM

Hello, I have literally searched everywhere possible and debugged everything I could and cannot for the life of me figure it out.

I have a computer that I run as a home file server and recently I noticed that file transfer speeds on the local network are only 1.3 MBps (10 megabits) when they used to be around 12 Mbps (100 megaBytes). I did all the standard debugging I could: Set the connection speed manually, un-install and re-install drivers for my motherboard, even re-installing windows didn't help. Today I finally went out and bought a new NIC (Intel (EXPI9301CT) Gigabit CT) to see if that would work and I still only get a 10 megabit connection. This is crazy as the card works perfectly in my other computer and so do all the devices on my network (even a 6 year old low end laptop connected at 100 megabits). Is there anything that I haven't done because none of this makes sense to me.

Here are the specs

AMD athlon II X2 250
ASUS M4A88TD-V evo/usb3
2gb DDR3
Win 7 64bit

Router: d-link DIR-655

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
- mix

Best solution

a b X LAN
June 5, 2013 10:10:06 PM

Try a different cable.

Also, what does Windows say the link speed is (not the transfer speed, the actual physical connection speed)?
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June 6, 2013 4:07:32 AM

Someone Somewhere said:
Try a different cable.

Also, what does Windows say the link speed is (not the transfer speed, the actual physical connection speed)?


I have attempted to use every port and cable I have and windows says that the speed it 10 mbps, I have tried setting the physical speed manually and that doesn't work.

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a b X LAN
June 6, 2013 4:10:46 AM

Sounds really strange. Is it limited to 10Mb/s on the switch at the other end?

Have you tried a different OS (Hint: Ubuntu LiveUSB)?
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June 6, 2013 6:43:11 AM

A limitation to 10 Mbps speed is usually due to a cable or network device issue. Its possible the ethernet cable between your router/switch and your computer is actually a 10BaseT compatible only cable, which has fewer wires than standard Cat5/e and cannot carry a faster signal. It's also possible with some basic or older routers/switches to configure ports to operate only at 10 Mbps if it cannot auto-negotiate the link with the other end.
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a b X LAN
June 6, 2013 7:15:20 AM

Quote:
I have attempted to use every port and cable I have


Plus the router he linked to is a Gigabit capable one. And it would go to 100BASE-TX - uses two pairs like 10. It's gigabit that went to four.
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June 12, 2013 6:30:48 PM

Someone Somewhere said:
Try a different cable.

Also, what does Windows say the link speed is (not the transfer speed, the actual physical connection speed)?


Hey, Just so everyone knows the solution was the cables. We make all of the cables in out house aside from a few using a standard crimper. It seems like the quality of the crimper or head was bad and the cables that we made would not go above 100mbps. Turns out a couple of store bought ones and only ONE that we made works at 1 Gbps. So everyone, when you get/buy a cable plug your computer directly into the router and make sure its quality is up to par!

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a b X LAN
June 12, 2013 8:08:04 PM

That's why you get a cable tester - I know from experience how hard those damn RJ45s are to crimp properly. A good crimper helps, though.

I've got a lot of home-made cables that run Gb fine.
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