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Insane and fake looking CPU temp

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June 7, 2013 11:57:25 AM

I recently bought myself an AMD fx 8320 and I installed it properly, checked the thermal paste and everything, I took it to computer shop to make them check as well to see if it was installed fine just to be sure. So the pc worked like a charm for about a month and then suddently I was playing Battlefield3 and from having a smooth game it just slowed down and it just went back to normal after 5-10 seconds, At first I thought it might have been the pc doing updates or the anti virus scan running by itself, so I checked but nothing. So I went back to playing my game and 10-15 minutes later it happend again, So I started wondering what it could be, First thing I checked was the game options, settings etc. Nothing there, Then I thought the cpu might have a problem or something so me and a friend put it in his computer and he had no problems at all, Tested it for an entire week almost. So then I took it back home and put it back in my mobo and I booted up my computer, And I started wondering if it might be their "security" system that slows down the CPU when it's getting too hot. So I installed a few programs like HWMonitor, AIDA, CoreTemp. And that's when I had the wierdest surprise of my life when I checked the programs (one by one, Not all running at the same time ofcourse) The cpu temp was at 206C (402F) and so when I saw that I really was like "what is going on?" First thing I did was closing every running program and also open my case and touch the heatsink and feel inside the case, But that's where I got a little surprise, the temp in my case is just fine and the heatsink is at normal temp also, Not that hot at all and I can just touch it with my hands.
I don't know what the problem is and I'm hoping some of you guys can help me out with this.
If you need any other info just ask

More about : insane fake cpu temp

June 7, 2013 12:06:05 PM

Sounds like a faulty temperature sensor on the motherboard to me with a number like that.

If your PC was at 206C, you would not currently have a PC any longer.
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June 7, 2013 12:09:55 PM

AMD doesn't use temp sensors on it's cpus, it uses a software algorithm to determent a "best guess" temp based on who knows... so the cpu's core temps are likely not going to be very accurate.

if that was a motherboard temp sensor it means nothing... just that it doesn't work right.

Touching the heatsink means little as well, generally those will always be fairly cool to the touch.

Do you have the stock heatsink or another type? cause the stock heatsink is absolutely not capable to cooling the 8 core fx cpus. If you need a new cpu cooler try a hyper evo 212, cheap and effective.
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June 7, 2013 12:11:51 PM

ingtar33 said:
AMD doesn't use temp sensors on it's cpus, it uses a software algorithm to determent a "best guess" temp based on who knows... so the cpu's core temps are likely not going to be very accurate.

if that was a motherboard temp sensor it means nothing... just that it doesn't work right.

Touching the heatsink means little as well, generally those will always be fairly cool to the touch.

Do you have the stock heatsink or another type? cause the stock heatsink is absolutely not capable to cooling the 8 core fx cpus. If you need a new cpu cooler try a hyper evo 212, cheap and effective.


Ack, put the derp sign on my head. I completely missed the CPU part. And I even have an aging Phenom secondary rig that always thinks TMPIN2 is roughly the temperature of the sun, too.
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June 7, 2013 12:17:18 PM

DSzymborski said:
ingtar33 said:
AMD doesn't use temp sensors on it's cpus, it uses a software algorithm to determent a "best guess" temp based on who knows... so the cpu's core temps are likely not going to be very accurate.

if that was a motherboard temp sensor it means nothing... just that it doesn't work right.

Touching the heatsink means little as well, generally those will always be fairly cool to the touch.

Do you have the stock heatsink or another type? cause the stock heatsink is absolutely not capable to cooling the 8 core fx cpus. If you need a new cpu cooler try a hyper evo 212, cheap and effective.


Ack, put the derp sign on my head. I completely missed the CPU part. And I even have an aging Phenom secondary rig that always thinks TMPIN2 is roughly the temperature of the sun, too.


Yeah, don't believe those sensors. Who knows what calibration coefficients they use...

I have also seen lots of people reporting that their CPU core temperatures are LOWER than ambient room temperatures, and some of them actually believe the sensor data, completely ignoring thermodynamics, of course.
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June 7, 2013 12:23:51 PM

Thanks for the answers guys, I do have a cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo, The thing is that like anyone probably knows, My cpu would already be dead by now if it was really at 206C.. I also think the temperature readings on this mobo are fake and I already bought a new one which will arrive soon I hope. But what bothers me is the fact that the computer slows down because it thinks the temperature really is that high
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June 7, 2013 12:27:26 PM

brian jongstra said:
Thanks for the answers guys, I do have a cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo, The thing is that like anyone probably knows, My cpu would already be dead by now if it was really at 206C.. I also think the temperature readings on this mobo are fake and I already bought a new one which will arrive soon I hope. But what bothers me is the fact that the computer slows down because it thinks the temperature really is that high


turn off quiet and cool... it should stop throttling.
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June 7, 2013 12:29:44 PM

I will try to turn that off right now, and test it for a little bit and post when I get some results
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June 7, 2013 12:49:28 PM

brian jongstra said:
I will try to turn that off right now, and test it for a little bit and post when I get some results


What is the motherboard ? Can you verify CPU to heatsink contact ? To verify, take off the heatsink and look at the base of the heatsink. The thermal paste on the metal of the heatsink should look like it was tight and evenly squeezed against the surface of the CPU.
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June 7, 2013 1:04:50 PM

My mobo is a msi 760gm p23 fx, I did check the thermal paste, it is applied correctly. So far turning of cool & quiet did seem to fix it but I can't tell after only 20 ish minutes. I will wait some more to see if it did fix it completly
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June 7, 2013 1:28:57 PM

Well, Like I said I was going to test it with cool & quiet turned off. Worked fine for 35 minutes but then it happend again, Took a screenshot of the program this time, Not sure it will help with anything but oh well.

http://i41.tinypic.com/2qw0sra.png
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June 7, 2013 2:33:48 PM

brian jongstra said:
Well, Like I said I was going to test it with cool & quiet turned off. Worked fine for 35 minutes but then it happend again, Took a screenshot of the program this time, Not sure it will help with anything but oh well.

http://i41.tinypic.com/2qw0sra.png


Well, I was afraid of this, but if your board is this one:

http://ca.msi.com/product/mb/760GM-P23--FX-.html#/?div=Basic

It clearly says .

Your CPU is overheating the VRMs onboard, and the motherboard is going into throttle mode to protect the onboard VRMs. Your CPU temperatures are okay as per your screen shot.

I'm pretty sure it is your motherboard protecting itself from VRM failure. These entry level boards usually have barely adequate VRM sections for the CPU, many of them despite being AM3+ compatible, can't really run the top of the line FX chips.
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June 7, 2013 2:57:26 PM

Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Well, Like I said I was going to test it with cool & quiet turned off. Worked fine for 35 minutes but then it happend again, Took a screenshot of the program this time, Not sure it will help with anything but oh well.

http://i41.tinypic.com/2qw0sra.png


Well, I was afraid of this, but if your board is this one:

http://ca.msi.com/product/mb/760GM-P23--FX-.html#/?div=Basic

It clearly says .

Your CPU is overheating the VRMs onboard, and the motherboard is going into throttle mode to protect the onboard VRMs. Your CPU temperatures are okay as per your screen shot.

I'm pretty sure it is your motherboard protecting itself from VRM failure. These entry level boards usually have barely adequate VRM sections for the CPU, many of them despite being AM3+ compatible, can't really run the top of the line FX chips.


I really feel stupid now because I did not check that.. I guess I did the right thing buying a better mobo then, I guess I will wait till that one arrives to see if it solves it. That would explain the high TMPIN1 temperature under load. Well thank you very much sir and I will wait to see if the new mobo solves this issue. I will update this as soon as I got my hands on it and tested it out for a while!
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June 7, 2013 4:07:06 PM

brian jongstra said:
Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Well, Like I said I was going to test it with cool & quiet turned off. Worked fine for 35 minutes but then it happend again, Took a screenshot of the program this time, Not sure it will help with anything but oh well.

http://i41.tinypic.com/2qw0sra.png


Well, I was afraid of this, but if your board is this one:

http://ca.msi.com/product/mb/760GM-P23--FX-.html#/?div=Basic

It clearly says .

Your CPU is overheating the VRMs onboard, and the motherboard is going into throttle mode to protect the onboard VRMs. Your CPU temperatures are okay as per your screen shot.

I'm pretty sure it is your motherboard protecting itself from VRM failure. These entry level boards usually have barely adequate VRM sections for the CPU, many of them despite being AM3+ compatible, can't really run the top of the line FX chips.


I really feel stupid now because I did not check that.. I guess I did the right thing buying a better mobo then, I guess I will wait till that one arrives to see if it solves it. That would explain the high TMPIN1 temperature under load. Well thank you very much sir and I will wait to see if the new mobo solves this issue. I will update this as soon as I got my hands on it and tested it out for a while!


Don't feel stupid. It happens. These boards (entry models anyway) are made cheaply, and skimpy VRMs are frequent, along with small text boxes to warn the users that you may not remember if you bought the board a while ago, or didn't read every line on the box. That textbox I linked to as an image was on their website. I DOUBT the box had that printed on it this clearly.

Here is a really nice online database of AMD motherboard VRMs and whether or not they can handle a certain wattage or OC:

http://www.overclock.net/t/946407/amd-motherboards-vrm-info-database
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June 7, 2013 4:56:02 PM

Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Well, Like I said I was going to test it with cool & quiet turned off. Worked fine for 35 minutes but then it happend again, Took a screenshot of the program this time, Not sure it will help with anything but oh well.

http://i41.tinypic.com/2qw0sra.png


Well, I was afraid of this, but if your board is this one:

http://ca.msi.com/product/mb/760GM-P23--FX-.html#/?div=Basic

It clearly says .

Your CPU is overheating the VRMs onboard, and the motherboard is going into throttle mode to protect the onboard VRMs. Your CPU temperatures are okay as per your screen shot.

I'm pretty sure it is your motherboard protecting itself from VRM failure. These entry level boards usually have barely adequate VRM sections for the CPU, many of them despite being AM3+ compatible, can't really run the top of the line FX chips.


I really feel stupid now because I did not check that.. I guess I did the right thing buying a better mobo then, I guess I will wait till that one arrives to see if it solves it. That would explain the high TMPIN1 temperature under load. Well thank you very much sir and I will wait to see if the new mobo solves this issue. I will update this as soon as I got my hands on it and tested it out for a while!


Don't feel stupid. It happens. These boards (entry models anyway) are made cheaply, and skimpy VRMs are frequent, along with small text boxes to warn the users that you may not remember if you bought the board a while ago, or didn't read every line on the box. That textbox I linked to as an image was on their website. I DOUBT the box had that printed on it this clearly.

Here is a really nice online database of AMD motherboard VRMs and whether or not they can handle a certain wattage or OC:

http://www.overclock.net/t/946407/amd-motherboards-vrm-info-database


I bought the mobo in a computer shop back then with a cpu that was compatible with it, since the guy that sold me it sold everything together. But to be honest that little image from the site is nowhere on the box itself but yeah I did not check for it when I bought the new cpu. Oh well all good anyways since everything is still "working". I will just have to wait a bit to get the new stuff to put a load on the system again but that isnt a problem hehe
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June 9, 2013 8:14:07 AM

Well to update this a bit, I took out the new cpu and put back in the older one that only needs 95w and the temps are stable now so I will have to wait for the new motherboard and see how it goes with the new cpu. But before I really get this closed and put as solved, I would like to ask one more thing, In the process of using my amd fx 8320 on the actual motherboard, Is it possible it took any sort of damage because it did not receive enough power from the board? Or is the mobo the only thing that might have taken some damage in the process?
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June 9, 2013 8:19:24 AM

brian jongstra said:
Well to update this a bit, I took out the new cpu and put back in the older one that only needs 95w and the temps are stable now so I will have to wait for the new motherboard and see how it goes with the new cpu. But before I really get this closed and put as solved, I would like to ask one more thing, In the process of using my amd fx 8320 on the actual motherboard, Is it possible it took any sort of damage because it did not receive enough power from the board? Or is the mobo the only thing that might have taken some damage in the process?


nope. never heard of a cpu being damaged by undervolting. Now if you blew up one of your mosfets or caps... i could see that frying your chip. But your mb wouldn't be working with the old cpu if that happened.
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June 9, 2013 8:21:40 AM

ingtar33 said:
brian jongstra said:
Well to update this a bit, I took out the new cpu and put back in the older one that only needs 95w and the temps are stable now so I will have to wait for the new motherboard and see how it goes with the new cpu. But before I really get this closed and put as solved, I would like to ask one more thing, In the process of using my amd fx 8320 on the actual motherboard, Is it possible it took any sort of damage because it did not receive enough power from the board? Or is the mobo the only thing that might have taken some damage in the process?


nope. never heard of a cpu being damaged by undervolting. Now if you blew up one of your mosfets or caps... i could see that frying your chip. But your mb wouldn't be working with the old cpu if that happened.


Alright thanks for the quick answer, both cpu's work fine still and everything booted up without a problem so yeah I think everything should be fine, just wanted to be sure! Thanks again
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June 9, 2013 8:25:14 AM

brian jongstra said:
Well to update this a bit, I took out the new cpu and put back in the older one that only needs 95w and the temps are stable now so I will have to wait for the new motherboard and see how it goes with the new cpu. But before I really get this closed and put as solved, I would like to ask one more thing, In the process of using my amd fx 8320 on the actual motherboard, Is it possible it took any sort of damage because it did not receive enough power from the board? Or is the mobo the only thing that might have taken some damage in the process?


That is hard to say. The motherboard was obviously throttling the VRMs to protect itself. No one knows for sure if the margins built into this safety feature are big enough to prevent damage, or how fast it kicks in to protect the board. When the VRMs can't supply a sufficient amount of current to the processor (as the BD/PD chips are current heavy), the voltages (Vcore mostly) generally will fluctuate with spikes and dips. The VRM when over-driven will quickly heat up and the additional heat might age the VRM MOSFETs. Who knows what kind of monitoring and throttling the board is doing, if it is purely thermal, there will be a lag between when the MOSFET damaging condition occurs and when throttling kicks in, so cumulatively speaking, every time this happens, there is a reduction in the life expectancy of the motherboard. But if the monitoring is based on current output, then it is much safer, as the board can latch the VRMs at a certain output level and won't allow the total power to rise further...

I would suggest that the CPU is most likely fine (spikes would have to be pretty large and prolonged to degrade the CPU), but the motherboard VRMs may or may not have taken a small/tiny toll (I am pretty sure the VRM throttling is thermal, as it is on most AM3+ boards), depending on what MSI set the thermal threshold at.
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June 9, 2013 8:29:14 AM

Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Well to update this a bit, I took out the new cpu and put back in the older one that only needs 95w and the temps are stable now so I will have to wait for the new motherboard and see how it goes with the new cpu. But before I really get this closed and put as solved, I would like to ask one more thing, In the process of using my amd fx 8320 on the actual motherboard, Is it possible it took any sort of damage because it did not receive enough power from the board? Or is the mobo the only thing that might have taken some damage in the process?


That is hard to say. The motherboard was obviously throttling the VRMs to protect itself. No one knows for sure if the margins built into this safety feature are big enough to prevent damage, or how fast it kicks in to protect the board. When the VRMs can't supply a sufficient amount of current to the processor (as the BD/PD chips are current heavy), the voltages (Vcore mostly) generally will fluctuate with spikes and dips. The VRM when over-driven will quickly heat up and the additional heat might age the VRM MOSFETs. Who knows what kind of monitoring and throttling the board is doing, if it is purely thermal, there will be a lag between when the MOSFET damaging condition occurs and when throttling kicks in, so cumulatively speaking, every time this happens, there is a reduction in the life expectancy of the motherboard. But if the monitoring is based on current output, then it is much safer, as the board can latch the VRMs at a certain output level and won't allow the total power to rise further...

I would suggest that the CPU is most likely fine (spikes would have to be pretty large and prolonged to degrade the CPU), but the motherboard VRMs may or may not have taken a small/tiny toll (I am pretty sure the VRM throttling is thermal, as it is on most AM3+ boards), depending on what MSI set the thermal threshold at.


Whenever it was heating up I stopped whatever I was doing anyways, Mainly to be sure the cpu wouldn't have any problems since I thought that was the main problem. If the board dies on me without having done damage to the new cpu I don't care that much about it since the board was pretty cheap and I'm getting the new one soon! But thanks for the detailed information sir, Very helpful!
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June 9, 2013 8:30:27 AM

brian jongstra said:
Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Well to update this a bit, I took out the new cpu and put back in the older one that only needs 95w and the temps are stable now so I will have to wait for the new motherboard and see how it goes with the new cpu. But before I really get this closed and put as solved, I would like to ask one more thing, In the process of using my amd fx 8320 on the actual motherboard, Is it possible it took any sort of damage because it did not receive enough power from the board? Or is the mobo the only thing that might have taken some damage in the process?


That is hard to say. The motherboard was obviously throttling the VRMs to protect itself. No one knows for sure if the margins built into this safety feature are big enough to prevent damage, or how fast it kicks in to protect the board. When the VRMs can't supply a sufficient amount of current to the processor (as the BD/PD chips are current heavy), the voltages (Vcore mostly) generally will fluctuate with spikes and dips. The VRM when over-driven will quickly heat up and the additional heat might age the VRM MOSFETs. Who knows what kind of monitoring and throttling the board is doing, if it is purely thermal, there will be a lag between when the MOSFET damaging condition occurs and when throttling kicks in, so cumulatively speaking, every time this happens, there is a reduction in the life expectancy of the motherboard. But if the monitoring is based on current output, then it is much safer, as the board can latch the VRMs at a certain output level and won't allow the total power to rise further...

I would suggest that the CPU is most likely fine (spikes would have to be pretty large and prolonged to degrade the CPU), but the motherboard VRMs may or may not have taken a small/tiny toll (I am pretty sure the VRM throttling is thermal, as it is on most AM3+ boards), depending on what MSI set the thermal threshold at.


Whenever it was heating up I stopped whatever I was doing anyways, Mainly to be sure the cpu wouldn't have any problems since I thought that was the main problem. If the board dies on me without having done damage to the new cpu I don't care that much about it since the board was pretty cheap and I'm getting the new one soon! But thanks for the detailed information sir, Very helpful!


That is very wise. Which new board did you get ? Just curious.

You are very welcome.
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June 9, 2013 8:33:00 AM

Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Well to update this a bit, I took out the new cpu and put back in the older one that only needs 95w and the temps are stable now so I will have to wait for the new motherboard and see how it goes with the new cpu. But before I really get this closed and put as solved, I would like to ask one more thing, In the process of using my amd fx 8320 on the actual motherboard, Is it possible it took any sort of damage because it did not receive enough power from the board? Or is the mobo the only thing that might have taken some damage in the process?


That is hard to say. The motherboard was obviously throttling the VRMs to protect itself. No one knows for sure if the margins built into this safety feature are big enough to prevent damage, or how fast it kicks in to protect the board. When the VRMs can't supply a sufficient amount of current to the processor (as the BD/PD chips are current heavy), the voltages (Vcore mostly) generally will fluctuate with spikes and dips. The VRM when over-driven will quickly heat up and the additional heat might age the VRM MOSFETs. Who knows what kind of monitoring and throttling the board is doing, if it is purely thermal, there will be a lag between when the MOSFET damaging condition occurs and when throttling kicks in, so cumulatively speaking, every time this happens, there is a reduction in the life expectancy of the motherboard. But if the monitoring is based on current output, then it is much safer, as the board can latch the VRMs at a certain output level and won't allow the total power to rise further...

I would suggest that the CPU is most likely fine (spikes would have to be pretty large and prolonged to degrade the CPU), but the motherboard VRMs may or may not have taken a small/tiny toll (I am pretty sure the VRM throttling is thermal, as it is on most AM3+ boards), depending on what MSI set the thermal threshold at.


Whenever it was heating up I stopped whatever I was doing anyways, Mainly to be sure the cpu wouldn't have any problems since I thought that was the main problem. If the board dies on me without having done damage to the new cpu I don't care that much about it since the board was pretty cheap and I'm getting the new one soon! But thanks for the detailed information sir, Very helpful!


That is very wise. Which new board did you get ? Just curious.

You are very welcome.


I got myself the Asus M5A99X EVO R2.0, I think that should be more than enough for what I do with my system hehe
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June 9, 2013 8:35:09 AM

You could try some better looking programs. There are alot of good accurate ones from like oc'ers forums.

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June 9, 2013 8:36:48 AM

bretmh said:
You could try some better looking programs. There are alot of good accurate ones from like oc'ers forums.



It is solved already, the cpu heat was just fake due to the motherboard going crazy sort of. But yes anyways Maxx_Power Gave me the right solution to the problem
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June 9, 2013 9:18:41 AM

brian jongstra said:
Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Maxx_Power said:
brian jongstra said:
Well to update this a bit, I took out the new cpu and put back in the older one that only needs 95w and the temps are stable now so I will have to wait for the new motherboard and see how it goes with the new cpu. But before I really get this closed and put as solved, I would like to ask one more thing, In the process of using my amd fx 8320 on the actual motherboard, Is it possible it took any sort of damage because it did not receive enough power from the board? Or is the mobo the only thing that might have taken some damage in the process?


That is hard to say. The motherboard was obviously throttling the VRMs to protect itself. No one knows for sure if the margins built into this safety feature are big enough to prevent damage, or how fast it kicks in to protect the board. When the VRMs can't supply a sufficient amount of current to the processor (as the BD/PD chips are current heavy), the voltages (Vcore mostly) generally will fluctuate with spikes and dips. The VRM when over-driven will quickly heat up and the additional heat might age the VRM MOSFETs. Who knows what kind of monitoring and throttling the board is doing, if it is purely thermal, there will be a lag between when the MOSFET damaging condition occurs and when throttling kicks in, so cumulatively speaking, every time this happens, there is a reduction in the life expectancy of the motherboard. But if the monitoring is based on current output, then it is much safer, as the board can latch the VRMs at a certain output level and won't allow the total power to rise further...

I would suggest that the CPU is most likely fine (spikes would have to be pretty large and prolonged to degrade the CPU), but the motherboard VRMs may or may not have taken a small/tiny toll (I am pretty sure the VRM throttling is thermal, as it is on most AM3+ boards), depending on what MSI set the thermal threshold at.


Whenever it was heating up I stopped whatever I was doing anyways, Mainly to be sure the cpu wouldn't have any problems since I thought that was the main problem. If the board dies on me without having done damage to the new cpu I don't care that much about it since the board was pretty cheap and I'm getting the new one soon! But thanks for the detailed information sir, Very helpful!


That is very wise. Which new board did you get ? Just curious.

You are very welcome.


I got myself the Asus M5A99X EVO R2.0, I think that should be more than enough for what I do with my system hehe


Oh well, that's one nice looking board... Cheers!!
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