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What is the difference between Kingston Hyper X memory and just "Kingston"

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June 9, 2013 12:49:15 AM

Example:

Kingston 8GB 1333 DDR3; and
8GB Genesis (1866C9D3K2/8GX) 2x4

and what's the meaning of the code on Kingston Hyper X, '(1866C9D3K2/8GX) 2x4'?
June 9, 2013 12:57:57 AM

Timing is typically tighter, better heatsinks, and typically better overclock.

Either way, a 8GB kit with two modules is better than a single stick.

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a c 1592 } Memory
June 9, 2013 1:10:03 AM
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1866C9D3K2/8GX 2x4

1866 DRAM frequency
C9 is the CAS Latency
D I believe is dual as in 2 sticks
8G total DRAM
X - I think designates Hyper X
2x4 indicates a 2 stick by 4GB set

I think this is right, haven't really used much Kingston recently
3K2 the base model
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June 9, 2013 3:48:15 AM

sorry guys, just a follow up question, whatdo you mean by...

'a 8GB kit with two modules is better than a single stick.'

you mean.. 2 pcs of 4gb of kingston is better than one pc of 8gb of memory stick??? (Total number of RAM is 2pcs)
or does it mean that, 2 modules is on one memory stick??? (Total number of RAM is 1pc)
a c 1592 } Memory
June 9, 2013 7:39:01 AM

Two sticks are better than 1 (almost always!)....a single 8GB stick with same specs operates as a 64bit device in single channel mode, when you take two sticks (2x4GB) and run in dual channel mode the memory controller looks at the sticks as a single mass of DRAM that can be addressed by the equivalent of 2 controllers so each channel operates in conjunction to run the total DRAM in effect as a 128 bit entity
a c 1592 } Memory
June 9, 2013 10:52:07 AM

Article is very true, in this case (the question) 2 sticks of 1866/CL9 vs a single 8 GB of 1333 is no contest, unless he somehow found a 1333 stick that runs at CL5/6 which would come close to approximating 1866/CL9 in dual channel performance
a b } Memory
June 13, 2013 12:52:25 PM

Vincent Manalo said:
Example:

Kingston 8GB 1333 DDR3; and
8GB Genesis (1866C9D3K2/8GX) 2x4

and what's the meaning of the code on Kingston Hyper X, '(1866C9D3K2/8GX) 2x4'?


Hi Vincent,
I'm Jewel with Kingston Technical Support. I just wanted to offer our assistance and explain our naming convention. We actually have a decoder for the part numbers here: http://www.kingston.com/us/memory/hyperx/decoder/ . the PN KHX1866C9D3K2/8GX breaks down to this:
KHX = Kingston HyperX
1866 = Frequency
C9 = CAS Latency
D3 = DDR3
K2 = Kit of 2
8G = Total Capacity
X = Intel XMP

If you have any other questions or concerns about our products, please call us at 1-800-435-0640 (USA and Canada only) M - F 6am - 6pm PT and I or another available Technician will assist you. Please be sure to have the part in question on hand when you call.

Thank you for selecting Kingston as your upgrade partner.
a c 1592 } Memory
June 13, 2013 1:05:00 PM

Thanks for the info Jewel, will tuck that info away
December 10, 2013 9:17:12 AM

Tradesman1 said:
1866C9D3K2/8GX 2x4

1866 DRAM frequency
C9 is the CAS Latency
D I believe is dual as in 2 sticks
8G total DRAM
X - I think designates Hyper X
2x4 indicates a 2 stick by 4GB set

I think this is right, haven't really used much Kingston recently
3K2 the base model


Hi,
I think you will find the D is the version of DDR ie. D3 = ddr3
K2 =??? maybe kit with 2 sticks anybody?
a c 1592 } Memory
December 10, 2013 4:45:55 PM

Yes, the Kingston rep cleared that up, 2 post up - back in June ;) 
!