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Configuring wireless printer to stay on static IP

Hello everyone, I've got a brother printer that is connected to the WiFi at my house but I notice that after a while it goes into offline mode. From what I've read, it happens when the IP address is changed through the router which makes me remove and then re-add the printer back onto my laptop. My question though is how can I configure the printer to stay on a static IP so that I don't have to keep removing and re-adding the printer every so often. Thanks for the help! (btw I'm using a Netgear router if it makes a difference).
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More about configuring wireless printer stay static
  1. You will need to create a dhcp reservation for your printer. Without knowing your exact model of your netgear wireless router, you should google the steps for your wireless router it's a pretty simple fix. Post on how it goes and if you need any more help.
  2. It's a brand new netgear N600 (WNDR3400v2). Would I be making a DHCP reservation through netgear genie or through windows? I also see that it should get assigned an IP address outside the network, and I have no idea how to do that so a walkthrough or even an article would be great :D
  3. Best answer
    This is lengthy, and everything is going to have slight variations based on O/S, router, and printer. So try to take these principles and google the steps based on your specific components, and you should be able to get it set up. Basically you need to give the printer a fixed address so it's always in the same spot, and you need to reserve that address in your router so the router doesn't accidentally give that address out to something else. And then you might need to manually reassign that new address to the printer in your computer if you already have it set up. So three broad steps. Here's the detailed version of how I did it on my pc. I have Windows 8 on a home-built Core i5, HP 8600 PCF/AIO, with an ASUS RT-N13U router. The printer is connecting wirelessly to my network, and I have one wireless laptop and one wired desktop using that printer:

    > Get printer's current IP address

    1. With everything running, tap on the printer's [here, HP 8600] control screen and go to Setup | Network | View Network Settings | [Wired, Wireless; per your setup]. Take note of the current IP address (I'll use 192.168.1.255 as the example in this case)

    > Set the printer to a manual/fixed IP address:

    2. With a web browser, go to that address (enter 192.168.1.255 in the address/url/go to bar and press enter)

    3. Click the Network tab. NOTE: this is a convenient place to copy the printer's MAC Address for later entry into your router.

    4. From the menu on the left side of the screen, click IPv4.

    5. In the "IP Address Configuration" section, click the radio button next to "Manual IP" and then click the "Suggest a Manual IP Address" button. This saves you the step of getting and entering the gateway info. The printer will suggest a high IP ID, you can accept it, or pick one of your own. If in doubt, use the suggested value. Write down this number for later steps.

    6. Click the "Apply" button. I did not enter anything in "DNS Address Configuration."

    7. At this point the address of the printer is changed, and set to a fixed address that is not likely to be the one you entered in step 1, so any links you click will now time out. So go back up to the address bar and enter the new IP address that was assigned in step 5. This will let you confirm the printer is listening on that address.

    > Add this address to your home network router

    8. With my current, and two previous routers, I am able to access the router's configuration screens through a web browser. For this I use the router's IP address. By default, many consumer routers are set to 192.168.1.1 (I changed mine for security reasons). Enter the correct IP address for your router in your browser and press Enter. Enter any credentials if you are required to do so.

    9. First from my left hand menu, I select LAN, then the DHCP Server tab. (Again, I have an ASUS RT-N13U router. Use Google to find similar steps for your specific router if it's not clear how to perform these steps.)

    10. In the "Manually Assigned IP around the DHCP List" section, click the radio button next to "Yes." This enables the inputs and buttons in the section. In the "MAC Address" input box, paste in the MAC Address you saved in step 3. In the "IP Address" box copy the IP address for the printer that you saved in step 5. Click the "Add" button, then click the "Apply" button.

    > Update any and all computers that use this printer

    11. Go to the printer port configuration screen for your printer. Generally all Windows computers will let you get to this screen by finding any icon for the printer, right clicking on it and selecting "Properties" from the context menu. If you are setting up the printer for the first time, it should be one of the steps in the setup process. Also, generally, if you can get to Control Panel, you can find the printers option and go from there. And for Windows 8, things are a little different, but the easiest way to start is to right click in the lower left corner of the screen and select Control Panel from the context menu that pops up.

    12. Choose "View Devices and Printers." Left click on your printer and then click "Print Server Properties" from the menubar at the top of the window. Then click the Ports tab.

    13. In the Ports config tab, click "Add Port" select "Standard TCP/IP Port" and then click "New Port..." This will launch a wizard.

    14. In the wizard, click "Next"; in the "Enter the Printer Name..." screen, enter the address from Step 5 in the first box -- it will automatically show up in the second box as well. Click "Next."

    15. If everything else went properly, the wizard will display information about your printer, the IP address you entered, and some more info. You will also, now, have a "Finish" button -- click it. Your new port assignment will show up in the "Ports on this server" box on the Ports screen, and it should be checked -- obviously, if it isn't, then do check it. Your printer should also show up next to it in the "Printer" column. Click "Apply" to close out this dialog (or "Cancel" if "Apply" is inactive, which should indicate that your changes were already saved).

    16. Print a test page, or do some other test print to confirm everything is set up properly.

    Repeat steps 11-16 for every computer you want to use this printer. And that's everything.

    Unfortunately, printers suck, and this won't solve any real connectivity problems -- this only addresses the issue of the printer's IP changing every time there's a power outage, it gets turned off, or, as it seems, every time it just goes to sleep, or every time your ROUTER is rebooted...this was all just to give the printer a "permanent" address and let your computers set that once and for all.

    Good luck! Feel free to comment with corrections or better shortcuts.
  4. jah_60025 said:
    This is lengthy, and everything is going to have slight variations based on O/S, router, and printer. So try to take these principles and google the steps based on your specific components, and you should be able to get it set up. Basically you need to give the printer a fixed address so it's always in the same spot, and you need to reserve that address in your router so the router doesn't accidentally give that address out to something else. And then you might need to manually reassign that new address to the printer in your computer if you already have it set up. So three broad steps. Here's the detailed version of how I did it on my pc. I have Windows 8 on a home-built Core i5, HP 8600 PCF/AIO, with an ASUS RT-N13U router. The printer is connecting wirelessly to my network, and I have one wireless laptop and one wired desktop using that printer:

    > Get printer's current IP address

    1. With everything running, tap on the printer's [here, HP 8600] control screen and go to Setup | Network | View Network Settings | [Wired, Wireless; per your setup]. Take note of the current IP address (I'll use 192.168.1.255 as the example in this case)

    > Set the printer to a manual/fixed IP address:

    2. With a web browser, go to that address (enter 192.168.1.255 in the address/url/go to bar and press enter)

    3. Click the Network tab. NOTE: this is a convenient place to copy the printer's MAC Address for later entry into your router.

    4. From the menu on the left side of the screen, click IPv4.

    5. In the "IP Address Configuration" section, click the radio button next to "Manual IP" and then click the "Suggest a Manual IP Address" button. This saves you the step of getting and entering the gateway info. The printer will suggest a high IP ID, you can accept it, or pick one of your own. If in doubt, use the suggested value. Write down this number for later steps.

    6. Click the "Apply" button. I did not enter anything in "DNS Address Configuration."

    7. At this point the address of the printer is changed, and set to a fixed address that is not likely to be the one you entered in step 1, so any links you click will now time out. So go back up to the address bar and enter the new IP address that was assigned in step 5. This will let you confirm the printer is listening on that address.

    > Add this address to your home network router

    8. With my current, and two previous routers, I am able to access the router's configuration screens through a web browser. For this I use the router's IP address. By default, many consumer routers are set to 192.168.1.1 (I changed mine for security reasons). Enter the correct IP address for your router in your browser and press Enter. Enter any credentials if you are required to do so.

    9. First from my left hand menu, I select LAN, then the DHCP Server tab. (Again, I have an ASUS RT-N13U router. Use Google to find similar steps for your specific router if it's not clear how to perform these steps.)

    10. In the "Manually Assigned IP around the DHCP List" section, click the radio button next to "Yes." This enables the inputs and buttons in the section. In the "MAC Address" input box, paste in the MAC Address you saved in step 3. In the "IP Address" box copy the IP address for the printer that you saved in step 5. Click the "Add" button, then click the "Apply" button.

    > Update any and all computers that use this printer

    11. Go to the printer port configuration screen for your printer. Generally all Windows computers will let you get to this screen by finding any icon for the printer, right clicking on it and selecting "Properties" from the context menu. If you are setting up the printer for the first time, it should be one of the steps in the setup process. Also, generally, if you can get to Control Panel, you can find the printers option and go from there. And for Windows 8, things are a little different, but the easiest way to start is to right click in the lower left corner of the screen and select Control Panel from the context menu that pops up.

    12. Choose "View Devices and Printers." Left click on your printer and then click "Print Server Properties" from the menubar at the top of the window. Then click the Ports tab.

    13. In the Ports config tab, click "Add Port" select "Standard TCP/IP Port" and then click "New Port..." This will launch a wizard.

    14. In the wizard, click "Next"; in the "Enter the Printer Name..." screen, enter the address from Step 5 in the first box -- it will automatically show up in the second box as well. Click "Next."

    15. If everything else went properly, the wizard will display information about your printer, the IP address you entered, and some more info. You will also, now, have a "Finish" button -- click it. Your new port assignment will show up in the "Ports on this server" box on the Ports screen, and it should be checked -- obviously, if it isn't, then do check it. Your printer should also show up next to it in the "Printer" column. Click "Apply" to close out this dialog (or "Cancel" if "Apply" is inactive, which should indicate that your changes were already saved).

    16. Print a test page, or do some other test print to confirm everything is set up properly.

    Repeat steps 11-16 for every computer you want to use this printer. And that's everything.

    Unfortunately, printers suck, and this won't solve any real connectivity problems -- this only addresses the issue of the printer's IP changing every time there's a power outage, it gets turned off, or, as it seems, every time it just goes to sleep, or every time your ROUTER is rebooted...this was all just to give the printer a "permanent" address and let your computers set that once and for all.

    Good luck! Feel free to comment with corrections or better shortcuts.



    This write-up was a great help getting my Brother MFC-9320CW set up for wireless. I've had this printer for years and could never get the wireless connection set up properly.

    When I tried the procedure above, step 2 did not work for me because the default IP assigned to the printer did not share the same first three number groups with the IP address of my computer. Once I set them both to 192.168.0., step 2 in jah_60025's writeup worked, and I was able to get into the printer's setup page.

    But that led to the next obstacle, a credentials dialog box to access the Networking setup page for the printer. For the Brother MFC-9320CW, I discovered with Google's help that the username/password is admin/access.

    I think most if not all of the settings in the printer setup page shown in the browser can also be set up using the control panel on the printer itself, but it's probably easier using the browser.

    Here are the things I remember doing to get my Brother printer set up (I used the keypad and display on the printer):

    1. Initial Setup > Network > Reset
    2. Network Setup > WLAN > WLAN Enable
    3. Network Setup > WLAN > TCP/IP > Boot Method > Static
    4. Network Setup > WLAN > Setup Wizard > [your WiFi SSID] > [your WiFi password] (use the keypad and arrows to enter)
    5. Network Setup > WLAN > TCP/IP > IP Address > 192.168.0.192

    You don't have to use .192 as the last number group, but that is what I used. MAKE SURE first three number groups match the first three groups in the IP address of your WiFi-connected computer (which you can get from a typing 'ipconfig' into a DOS box/command prompt). If they don't match, the computer and the printer cannot talk to each other, and you won't be able to access the printer setup page.

    Adding the static IP address to my router (TPLink Archer C7) was a bit different than described above, but once I found the "DHCP Setup" page in the router setup, it was pretty obvious I needed to "bind" the printer's MAC address to the IP address I chose.

    Finally, I just went through the 'Add Printer" procedure, and my Windows 7 computers and my Windows 10 laptops all found the Brother printer right away. I do not know if it was even necessary to add the TCP/IP port to the printer properties, but I did it anyway as described by jah_60025.

    Wow, I can't believe after all these years I finally figured this out. Hope this helps the next guy.
  5. Stag1928 said:
    It's a brand new netgear N600 (WNDR3400v2). Would I be making a DHCP reservation through netgear genie or through windows? I also see that it should get assigned an IP address outside the network, and I have no idea how to do that so a walkthrough or even an article would be great :D
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