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Haswell vs IB vPro

I have been looking everywhere, but I am unable to find any significant differences between the two when it comes to vPro technology. My company does IT support, and we use vPro a lot for troubleshooting purposes. The clients that we get these systems for do not need any beastly machines, we typically just get the basic i5 for them (would go with i3, but no vPro there). I am just wondering if there is any reason to switch to purchasing the new 4th gen machines (given that processing and power consumption are not a factor in this decision).
thanks.
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More about haswell vpro
  1. I don't really mess with it, but read a bit about it in a Intel Partner thing they sent me, they have a support center here:

    http://communities.intel.com/community/vproexpert

    might find some info there if nobody chimes in
  2. For Vpro, you want to steer clear of "k" models...especially 4th gen. IB removed many of the virtualization features, 4th gen ("hasfail") went ahead and removed the rest. So, I would recommend something like a i5-3470 or something similar. Stick with what you're doing, no reason to go to 4th gen.
  3. Tradesman1 said:
    I don't really mess with it, but read a bit about it in a Intel Partner thing they sent me, they have a support center here:

    http://communities.intel.com/community/vproexpert

    might find some info there if nobody chimes in


    Thank you, i will check that out.

    8350rocks said:
    For Vpro, you want to steer clear of "k" models...especially 4th gen. IB removed many of the virtualization features, 4th gen ("hasfail") went ahead and removed the rest. So, I would recommend something like a i5-3470 or something similar. Stick with what you're doing, no reason to go to 4th gen.


    Yeah, I have seen that the "K" models dont even support vpro, but you said that they "removed the rest of the virtualization features", its not that i do not believe you, but can you point me to your info source for this? I simply cannot base my buying decisions for computers we are going to be purchasing based off of heresay (no offense meant).
    but this IS the kind of information that I am looking for. Thank you.
  4. A couple things I've read talked about improvements i.e.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6355/intels-haswell-architecture/11

    not sure if fully applicable here, but Intel sends me lots of crap, I just try to bookmark references that I can pass along
  5. Best answer
  6. 8350rocks said:
    For Vpro, you want to steer clear of "k" models...especially 4th gen. IB removed many of the virtualization features, 4th gen ("hasfail") went ahead and removed the rest. So, I would recommend something like a i5-3470 or something similar. Stick with what you're doing, no reason to go to 4th gen.
    The K series don't have vPro or VT-d, but they still provide VT-x. The non-K version offers all features required for office systems, including vPro.
    http://ark.intel.com/products/75047/Intel-Core-i5-4670-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_80-GHz
    http://ark.intel.com/products/76641/Intel-Core-i5-4670R-Processor-4M-Cache-up-to-3_70-GHz
  7. GhislainG said:
    8350rocks said:
    For Vpro, you want to steer clear of "k" models...especially 4th gen. IB removed many of the virtualization features, 4th gen ("hasfail") went ahead and removed the rest. So, I would recommend something like a i5-3470 or something similar. Stick with what you're doing, no reason to go to 4th gen.
    The K series don't have vPro or VT-d, but they still provide VT-x. The non-K version offers all features required for office systems, including vPro.
    http://ark.intel.com/products/75047/Intel-Core-i5-4670-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_80-GHz
    http://ark.intel.com/products/76641/Intel-Core-i5-4670R-Processor-4M-Cache-up-to-3_70-GHz


    I still wouldn't waste money on 4th gen intel solutions...they're not worth the extra money. Especially for office applications.
  8. I can't figure out why you'd make such a recommendation. We are talking about office systems that can be centrally managed and secured, not gaming systems.
  9. GhislainG said:
    I can't figure out why you'd make such a recommendation. We are talking about office systems that can be centrally managed and secured, not gaming systems.


    Because power consumption is higher on 4th gen across the board, and office applications don't need the extra performance. If you're running a business and "good enough" costs less money than "more than good enough"...you get good enough and save yourself money. If you cater to businesses, they will thank you for saving them money, especially when it comes to IT, because IT is so %$*(@#& expensive to begin with!
  10. I presume you're not in IT, otherwise your perception would probably be different. The role of IT often is to provide solutions to make a business more competitive.
  11. GhislainG said:
    I presume you're not in IT, otherwise your perception would probably be different. The role of IT often is to provide solutions to make a business more competitive.


    That depends on what you're doing...if you're typing documents and using web browsers...where do you gain from buying a more expensive system, when one far simpler would do the job?

    With virtualization systems, you still wouldn't see a dramatic performance increase that justifies the increased cost of this generation.

    Additionally, if your workloads are heavy, then 4th gen intel's have terrible power consumption numbers compared to Ivy Bridge at anything above idle.

    The only time I could even see someone argue the case would be if your system was going to run at idle over 90% of the time when it's on during the day. Otherwise increased initial cost + increased power consumption does not justify a 5% performance increase for jumping to a new hardware generation.

    Value over performance...as a business, I can justify 10% higher costs and 10% higher power consumption for a 30% performance increase. I cannot justify it for a 5% performance increase. In this instance total value < cost of new hardware.

    It's not justifiable...clearly you've never run a business, or your perception would be different.
  12. I know from several of your posts that you don't like Haswell procesors, but they are quite good. Dell have already switched to Haswell for their business PCs and I'm sure other manufacturers will do as well. All I'm trying to say is that when buying a large number of PCs, going with the latest sometimes makes sense.
  13. Dell is on the verge of bankruptcy...that isn't a great example. Intel is probably giving them kickbacks to push the new product.
  14. Dell are not alone; all large manufacturers get kickbacks.
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