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Blu-Ray for TV without HDMI

Last response: in Home Theatre
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June 13, 2013 8:13:28 PM

I have a 13 year old TV that has no HDMI or DVI input. It has component video and S-video hookups. It still works well. I have seen Blu-Ray players drop drastically in price and thought about getting one, but none of them I found in stores has any connectors except HDMI. Looking online for any Blu-Ray players with component video has been a bit misleading as the description says "HDMI component video" and many don't include pictures of the back to verify if it has the Red-Green-Blue component video.

Do I have any options, other than buying a new TV with HDMI, to play Blu-Rays?

More about : blu ray hdmi

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June 14, 2013 3:23:44 AM

johnnyq1233 said:
You want one of these...
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Audio-Video-AV-HDMI-Male-5-RCA-R...
Hope this helps


"Note: This cable is not a converter and will not convert the HDMI digital signals to analogue signals. Please make sure your output and input devices work with this cable."

Looked at similar solutions, but these are intended to be used to connect older components to a newer TV that has HDMI. Not newer components to older TVs without HDMI.
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June 14, 2013 6:55:20 AM

Over thinking the solution is never an answer, The cable is almost half the cost of the brp. I just picked up a Panasonic for 20 bucks on ebay with component in and out along with s-video,vga and hdmi
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a b x TV
December 12, 2013 10:43:29 AM

Bluray players not longer have component video outputs that work with HD. This is less secure than the HDMI output that has HDCP protection. You can find one that has composite video output but probably not S-Video. You don't mention that connection but it would be a surprise if you had the other two and not composite.
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December 23, 2013 9:03:20 PM

americanaudiophile said:
Bluray players not longer have component video outputs that work with HD. This is less secure than the HDMI output that has HDCP protection. You can find one that has composite video output but probably not S-Video. You don't mention that connection but it would be a surprise if you had the other two and not composite.


Composite video on a Blu-Ray player looks pretty bad.. only 480i vs 1080i or 720p. My parents had an old Toshiba projection with component inputs and the picture looked absolutely crisp with a Blu with component outputs. My parents passed the TV along to my sister and her husband when they upgraded to an LED but kept the Blu player. They mistakenly bought a Blu for my sister's husband that only has HDMI. Composite is compromising it quite a bit when there has been a perfectly fine HD substitute for older sets for several years. I was trying to help my parents find a Blu with component outputs before Christmas, but no luck. Have they seriously become obsolete? Both my Blu-Ray devices support component (PS3 and a Magnavox connected player) and my parents' LG does component. Why stop now?
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May 29, 2014 4:32:47 PM

J0hnnyscene said:
americanaudiophile said:
Bluray players not longer have component video outputs that work with HD. This is less secure than the HDMI output that has HDCP protection. You can find one that has composite video output but probably not S-Video. You don't mention that connection but it would be a surprise if you had the other two and not composite.


Composite video on a Blu-Ray player looks pretty bad.. only 480i vs 1080i or 720p. My parents had an old Toshiba projection with component inputs and the picture looked absolutely crisp with a Blu with component outputs. My parents passed the TV along to my sister and her husband when they upgraded to an LED but kept the Blu player. They mistakenly bought a Blu for my sister's husband that only has HDMI. Composite is compromising it quite a bit when there has been a perfectly fine HD substitute for older sets for several years. I was trying to help my parents find a Blu with component outputs before Christmas, but no luck. Have they seriously become obsolete? Both my Blu-Ray devices support component (PS3 and a Magnavox connected player) and my parents' LG does component. Why stop now?


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May 29, 2014 4:55:25 PM

It has been Hollywood's desire to control everything. Closing the analog hole was their ultimate goal, hence the DMCA probably being the reason they decided to take it one step further and cripple everything as much as possible. If you remember, Hollywood has added Macrovision to their VHS tapes, CSS and CGMS-A and Macrovision to their DVDs, BD+, Cinavia, and AACS renewable security on their BDs, as well as HDCP to the HDMI signal, giving a blank screen to some people who only just wanted to watch a movie, not to mention needing constant updates to get new AACS keys in order to play the new discs. By making everything all HDMI, Hollywood closes the analog hole, like they have been wanting to do from the beginning. Now their ultimate dream is realized. By having only a sindle HDMI connector, the signal is encrypted all the way to the telly, and I pity you people who went ahead and got the 720P Funai plasma TVs that only had component. You simply wont be able to hook them together. Closing the analog hole was simply an idiotic idea that only hurt the format, and you can see from all the evidence that when people record off the discs, they do it digitally, using programs and a burner, not an output. I also forgot to mention that HDCP has a 'renewable' feature, and you may one day get a blank screen in the future, even if your TV works today. For more, read HDCP renewability messages, e.t.c., or just Google. (HDCPs shiny red button is also a good read, again at Google. ) Hollywood could have just had Blu-ray play on 12-15 inch portable hi def players running off 8-10 D batteries, and output nothing to the TV, as well as provide no failsafe backup use for the consumer by not allowing any Blu-ray burners for PCs, but they probably knew deep inside that if they had done so, they would have probably killed the Blu-ray format, as consumers would have felt that it was going to be PSP proprietary format all over again. People can smell a propriety format a mile away, which is why Hollywood hasn't gone any further in crippling the Blu-ray format. There really isn't much of a solution, except buying a new TV. It is illegal(due to the DMCA) to make any Blu-ray player with any kind of an analog output anymore. The anti circumvention clause of the DMCA was written so broadly that anything like a Blu-ray player with analog output would be considered a circumvention device, and any company making analog output on a Blu-ray player would have their license revoked, and be shut down. Laptops now usually hook up only thru HDMI, but can be gotten around by getting an HDMI to component converter if you can find online, buying an external Blu-ray drive and just buying the third party(DVD-Fab playback only software) playback software if you don't want to mess with blank discs, and rippers. You would still be stuck needing some off the internet HDMI to component converter, but it would still work, and not obey HDCP. Your cheapest option if you didn't buy anything would be to get a new TV, and I know that is not comforting, but that is the way things are at the moment. (now you know why DVD recorders are not seen anymore) It would have been fine to eliminate connectivity options and such if it did solve piracy, but it does not, as people have stopped using the dual VCR copy method long ago.
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