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Haswell with Virtu

Last response: in Motherboards
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June 14, 2013 6:18:27 AM

Hi. I'm very tempted to upgrade with all this nice new haswell kit coming available. I really want to make use of virtu. The pc sits for hours doing nothing, then occasionally I need some real oomph on the graphics. I'm having trouble finding a board that states it supports virtu. And ideally I want a cheap board as I have no interest in overclocking.

Do certain chipsets support virtu as standard, or is it implemented on a per individual board basis? Can anyone recommend a good cheap haswell board that has it?

More about : haswell virtu

a b V Motherboard
June 14, 2013 6:39:51 AM

do you mean virtumvp? i believe theres a list on their site showing the supported mobos? most newer boards are starting to support it but a low end board will not. dont cheap out on your mother board youll regret it
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a c 154 V Motherboard
June 14, 2013 9:43:02 AM

Virtu MVP is junk.

I started to test it a while ago and every stage of the process was painful including just setting up the BIOS and software. For example, you can use "i-mode" (plug monitor into motherboard) to only use the dedicated graphics card when gaming but I soon found a couple games that didn't work so I would have had to physically put the monitor back to the dedicated card and reboot in d-mode.

Even with their updated software (version 2) there are far too many issues. You'll pull out your hair before finally giving up and uninstalling the entire mess.
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June 14, 2013 1:57:21 PM

06yfz450ridr said:
do you mean virtumvp? i believe theres a list on their site showing the supported mobos? most newer boards are starting to support it but a low end board will not. dont cheap out on your mother board youll regret it


Yes, virtumvp is what I meant. And thanks, there is just such a list. And all the mobos are z77. Haven't found any for haswell that support it.

I am curious as to why you say don't cheap out on the motherboard. I have been using the cheapest asus or gigabyte boards I can buy for as long as I have been building pcs, at least 10 years, and never found reason to regret it.
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a c 154 V Motherboard
June 15, 2013 5:55:41 PM

triplemaya said:
06yfz450ridr said:
do you mean virtumvp? i believe theres a list on their site showing the supported mobos? most newer boards are starting to support it but a low end board will not. dont cheap out on your mother board youll regret it


Yes, virtumvp is what I meant. And thanks, there is just such a list. And all the mobos are z77. Haven't found any for haswell that support it.

I am curious as to why you say don't cheap out on the motherboard. I have been using the cheapest asus or gigabyte boards I can buy for as long as I have been building pcs, at least 10 years, and never found reason to regret it.


Cheaper motherboards can't overclock as well and are more prone to fail. It sounds like you've had good success, but many people with cheaper motherboards have issues.

Aside from reliability there are lots of little things such as SATA controllers, main chipset performance, Audio chip etc.
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June 16, 2013 4:57:51 AM

photonboy said:
triplemaya said:
06yfz450ridr said:
do you mean virtumvp? i believe theres a list on their site showing the supported mobos? most newer boards are starting to support it but a low end board will not. dont cheap out on your mother board youll regret it


Yes, virtumvp is what I meant. And thanks, there is just such a list. And all the mobos are z77. Haven't found any for haswell that support it.

I am curious as to why you say don't cheap out on the motherboard. I have been using the cheapest asus or gigabyte boards I can buy for as long as I have been building pcs, at least 10 years, and never found reason to regret it.


Cheaper motherboards can't overclock as well and are more prone to fail. It sounds like you've had good success, but many people with cheaper motherboards have issues.

Aside from reliability there are lots of little things such as SATA controllers, main chipset performance, Audio chip etc.


I don't overclock, which is why I have never bothered with more expensive boards. And of course I make sure it has the number and type of SATA controllers I need. I'm using an ssd with the later SATA controller on this pc.

As I said, I always use the cheapest board that will do the job from Asus or Gigabyte. Are you telling me that their cheap boards are more likely to fail than their expensive boards? This would be useful information. But I find it hard to believe. (As it happens, I seem to be having trouble with two of the sata controllers on this board. But I took this as so unlikely that I am putting it down to cables or pebkac.)
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a c 154 V Motherboard
June 16, 2013 5:49:32 PM

triplemaya said:
photonboy said:
triplemaya said:
06yfz450ridr said:
do you mean virtumvp? i believe theres a list on their site showing the supported mobos? most newer boards are starting to support it but a low end board will not. dont cheap out on your mother board youll regret it


Yes, virtumvp is what I meant. And thanks, there is just such a list. And all the mobos are z77. Haven't found any for haswell that support it.

I am curious as to why you say don't cheap out on the motherboard. I have been using the cheapest asus or gigabyte boards I can buy for as long as I have been building pcs, at least 10 years, and never found reason to regret it.


Cheaper motherboards can't overclock as well and are more prone to fail. It sounds like you've had good success, but many people with cheaper motherboards have issues.

Aside from reliability there are lots of little things such as SATA controllers, main chipset performance, Audio chip etc.


I don't overclock, which is why I have never bothered with more expensive boards. And of course I make sure it has the number and type of SATA controllers I need. I'm using an ssd with the later SATA controller on this pc.

As I said, I always use the cheapest board that will do the job from Asus or Gigabyte. Are you telling me that their cheap boards are more likely to fail than their expensive boards? This would be useful information. But I find it hard to believe. (As it happens, I seem to be having trouble with two of the sata controllers on this board. But I took this as so unlikely that I am putting it down to cables or pebkac.)


Cheaper motherboards by necessity use less reliable parts:
- capacitors
- voltage regulators
- smaller heatsinks

Also, there is a PERFORMANCE difference between components. For example, my current Intel SATA3 (Sata 6gbps) gets WRITES of over 500MB/second on my Samsung 840 Pro but I tried it on a different motherboard using a MARVELL SATA3 controller and it was only getting 200MB/second!!

Value boards tend to use last-gen audio chips as well as simply not having features that others may want (eSATA, Crossfire, NVidia etc.)

*I can't find the link, but someone at Toms was going to buy an MSI motherboard as it was inexpensive (about $80) and it "suited his needs." However, I looked up the review for it and found it had several issues with instability. This instability was probably caused by a combination of lower-quality voltage-regulators, too-small heatsinks and other cheaper parts.
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June 17, 2013 4:35:45 AM

photonboy said:
triplemaya said:
photonboy said:
triplemaya said:
06yfz450ridr said:
do you mean virtumvp? i believe theres a list on their site showing the supported mobos? most newer boards are starting to support it but a low end board will not. dont cheap out on your mother board youll regret it


Yes, virtumvp is what I meant. And thanks, there is just such a list. And all the mobos are z77. Haven't found any for haswell that support it.

I am curious as to why you say don't cheap out on the motherboard. I have been using the cheapest asus or gigabyte boards I can buy for as long as I have been building pcs, at least 10 years, and never found reason to regret it.


Cheaper motherboards can't overclock as well and are more prone to fail. It sounds like you've had good success, but many people with cheaper motherboards have issues.

Aside from reliability there are lots of little things such as SATA controllers, main chipset performance, Audio chip etc.


I don't overclock, which is why I have never bothered with more expensive boards. And of course I make sure it has the number and type of SATA controllers I need. I'm using an ssd with the later SATA controller on this pc.

As I said, I always use the cheapest board that will do the job from Asus or Gigabyte. Are you telling me that their cheap boards are more likely to fail than their expensive boards? This would be useful information. But I find it hard to believe. (As it happens, I seem to be having trouble with two of the sata controllers on this board. But I took this as so unlikely that I am putting it down to cables or pebkac.)


Cheaper motherboards by necessity use less reliable parts:
- capacitors
- voltage regulators
- smaller heatsinks

Also, there is a PERFORMANCE difference between components. For example, my current Intel SATA3 (Sata 6gbps) gets WRITES of over 500MB/second on my Samsung 840 Pro but I tried it on a different motherboard using a MARVELL SATA3 controller and it was only getting 200MB/second!!

Value boards tend to use last-gen audio chips as well as simply not having features that others may want (eSATA, Crossfire, NVidia etc.)

*I can't find the link, but someone at Toms was going to buy an MSI motherboard as it was inexpensive (about $80) and it "suited his needs." However, I looked up the review for it and found it had several issues with instability. This instability was probably caused by a combination of lower-quality voltage-regulators, too-small heatsinks and other cheaper parts.


Many thanks. That is well worth knowing. I have always stayed away from the pricier boards because I did not see the point. But since my pc is my production equipment in use all day every day I see things differently in the light of this conversation. :) 
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a c 154 V Motherboard
June 19, 2013 7:52:04 PM

There are THREE TIERS of motherboards when you consider value:

Tier1 (sub $100): may be adequate for basic PC's but more prone to issues

Tier2 ($100 to $150): most of the value of the most expensive; reliable on average

Tier3 ($150+): overkill for most users. reliability is good/great but not best value.

By don't get a "cheap" motherboard I don't mean spend $220 but rather aim for a motherboard in the $100 to $150 that also gets GOOD REVIEWS and has the features you need.
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