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Samsung 840 vs 840 pro 256gb ssd, real world difference?Reliability?

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June 16, 2013 8:57:31 AM

I always heard the regular 840 would wear out faster,but it's about ~160-170 and the pro version is ~$230-250


just want it for my OS and for games to load faster, bf3,and when bf4 comes out. I don't do any editing,etc.....just a gaming PC.


there's a middle ground Corsair Neutron (new version I'm guessing) with 5 year warranty that's $199 but eh.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



would the regular samsung 840 be good enough? I just have a 1tb seagate HDD now. I was wondering how quick it would wear out due to it's different flash than the PRO version though. I don't want to spend that money on the regular 840 and it wear out quickly. It has good read speeds which is what's important, write not so much, still better than regular HDD though.



that Corsair SSD I linked does have way better I/O speed than the regular 840,but does that matter in real life usage?

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June 16, 2013 11:38:43 AM

The warranty might be the deciding factor. 5 years versus whatever the warranty is for the Samsung.
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June 16, 2013 12:36:31 PM

spooky2th said:
The warranty might be the deciding factor. 5 years versus whatever the warranty is for the Samsung.


I probably would be moving games frequently though with the steam-mover program I found, so maybe the 840 pro with it's longer life would be better?


I was going to keep a few multiplayer games,then a few single player games,which I would either delete or move back to my 1tb when finished.

was looking up how to set up steam and move my library over to the ssd and it wasn't that bad, haven't looked into origin yet, I hope I won't have to redownload the 35gb Battlefield 3....lol
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June 16, 2013 1:17:58 PM

Samsung 840 non pro was tested and found to have over twice the lifespan advertised.

840 Pro is faster , I own 2 of each.

Both the 840 and the 840 Pro use Samsung's MDX memory controller. The new chip contains three ARM Cortex-R4 cores as opposed to the 830 family's ARM9 chips, and the cores run at a higher clockspeed (300MHz as opposed to 220MHz). The difference between the 840 and the 840 Pro is that the 840 Pro uses Samsung's Toggle Mode MLC Flash rather than the newer, cheaper, and slower TLC (triple-level cell) NAND in the 840. The warranty terms are also different; the 840 has a three-year warranty, while the 840 Pro is warrantied for five.

pcmag.com

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2419215,00.asp < Read the rest here
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June 16, 2013 3:18:34 PM

SSD reliability is in general very very good. Differences in speed are generally unnoticeable, and you should buy the cheapest fast drive that is also reliable. So far the chart goes as (according to general reputation)

CHEAP= OCZ, Sandisk, Crucial

EXPENSIVE= Plextor, Intel

RELIABLE=(pretty much all new ones are good) people say Plextor, Intel are most reliable. as said above, Samsung is also proven to be good.

NOT RELIABLE= OCZ drives (uneven reliability), anything with Sandforce besides Intel

FAST= Plextor, Samsung, OCZ, Sandisk

SLOW= Crucial, Intel, Sandforce drives
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June 16, 2013 4:22:43 PM

The newer models are more reliable, IMO. The first two SSDs I purchased died on me. The first was a Crucial M4, 512GB. It loaded windows fast but every time I updated windows it crashed on me. After three attempts to load and then update windows and it dying, it was dead and I could not load a thing on it. Took it back to the CompUSA store and got my money back. Next I ordered an OCZ Agility 4, 512GB. Everything was perfect until it died completely right at one month so I could not return it to newegg. OCZ has a great RMA program. Exactly nine days later I had a brand new SSD in my hand. It's been 8 to 9 months now of perfection. Good luck on your choice! Hope you have better luck than I did. laughing......

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July 5, 2013 4:45:21 PM

spooky2th said:
The newer models are more reliable, IMO. The first two SSDs I purchased died on me. The first was a Crucial M4, 512GB. It loaded windows fast but every time I updated windows it crashed on me. After three attempts to load and then update windows and it dying, it was dead and I could not load a thing on it. Took it back to the CompUSA store and got my money back. Next I ordered an OCZ Agility 4, 512GB. Everything was perfect until it died completely right at one month so I could not return it to newegg. OCZ has a great RMA program. Exactly nine days later I had a brand new SSD in my hand. It's been 8 to 9 months now of perfection. Good luck on your choice! Hope you have better luck than I did. laughing......



Crucial M4's required a Firmware update to work with an update that Windows 7 pushed out in June. Your drive wasn't dead. After the update it actually booted windows 5 seconds faster than before! Windows started freezing up and BSODing one day and i checked Crucials website and there the new firmware was that was listed "required to run on windows 8" I took this as Microsoft is sneaking in stuff from windows 8 into win7 with their updates. Either way looks like your happy. Just figured id post a solution to the problem you posted. I have 3 of the newer M4's in my rig and 2 older C300's made by crucial that are 4 years old in my wifes computer and they are still ticking. Odd thing was the C300's didnt require any type of firmware update. SSD's arnt just hardware anymore. they are their own device and need love nowadays.
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July 6, 2013 6:41:14 AM

I'd personally take the 840 Pro, but if you want to save money and still have an exceptionally fast drive (significantly faster than the Crucial m4, equal to the Neutron and almost as fast as the Neutron GTX) the Plextor M5S is an excellent option. Alternatively, the Sandisk Ultra Plus is almost as fast as the M5S and almost the same price. Reviews said right from the start that the reduced endurance of the 840 TLC wouldn't be a problem for most users, but when excellent alternatives exist I don't see any reason to risk it.
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July 6, 2013 9:47:33 AM

Our company has been using SSDs for several generations now since the very first Vertex drives were released. Right now, the SSDs we use in custom builds are Samsung 840 Pro drives. Basically, we chose to use the best based on the rated performance and reliability, and that drive seems to fit the bill wonderfully. The 840 is a little cheaper, but you're not going to get the performance out of it and quite possibly, you're not going to get the reliability out of it. SSDs have made huge strides in the last several years. It took about four years of continual usage, in RAID and non-RAID configurations, before the original Vertex drives I had in my own system failed. I'm now running Vertex 3 in my home computer, with no problem after two years, and all of the Samsung drives we have used keep trucking along as well.

For general home usage, the Samsung 840 is going to be fine, but Sam_p_lay said it best above, "... when excellent alternatives exist I don't see any reason to risk it."
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