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PC Gaming Headset

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June 18, 2013 12:10:50 AM

I'm looking for a mid range gaming headset that offers 7.1 or 5.1 audio that is under 200$ and has a wired connection. Im planning on buying a microphone separately so mic quality doesn't matter. Comfortability is very important for me as well because I play for very long sessions. Currently I am looking to buy the Tritton 720+, Steelseries Siberia V2 USB or the Astro A40s, but the A40s seem a bit expensive. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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June 18, 2013 12:01:40 PM

I always recommend the GameCon 780. It's not on your price range but it's worth giving it a look,
a b 4 Gaming
June 18, 2013 12:12:41 PM

Are you looking for headphones that actually have multiple drivers in the set, or those that do virtual surround sound?
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June 18, 2013 2:38:53 PM

RedJaron said:
Are you looking for headphones that actually have multiple drivers in the set, or those that do virtual surround sound?


I would prefer virtual surround sound as I don't have or want to buy a good sound card.
a b 4 Gaming
June 18, 2013 2:56:10 PM

jaehyun0102 said:
I would prefer virtual surround sound as I don't have or want to buy a good sound card.


You misunderstand. Some headsets actually have multiple small speaker drivers in them, so the surround sound effect is real. Most have just two large drivers in them and use a digital sound processor ( DSP ) that takes a Dolby or DTS signal and mixes a two-channel stereo sound that emulates what your ears would actually hear from multiple speakers. Some DSPs are good enough that it can be tough to tell the difference unless you're using really high end headphones.

And none of this requires high-end sound cards in your computer ( more high-end than what's likely on your mboard already. ) If your mboard has a digital audio output and can mix 5.1, 6.1, or 7.1 audio, you'll be fine.
June 18, 2013 3:12:09 PM

RedJaron said:
jaehyun0102 said:
I would prefer virtual surround sound as I don't have or want to buy a good sound card.


You misunderstand. Some headsets actually have multiple small speaker drivers in them, so the surround sound effect is real. Most have just two large drivers in them and use a digital sound processor ( DSP ) that takes a Dolby or DTS signal and mixes a two-channel stereo sound that emulates what your ears would actually hear from multiple speakers. Some DSPs are good enough that it can be tough to tell the difference unless you're using really high end headphones.

And none of this requires high-end sound cards in your computer ( more high-end than what's likely on your mboard already. ) If your mboard has a digital audio output and can mix 5.1, 6.1, or 7.1 audio, you'll be fine.


I don't really care about how many speaker drivers there are. I heard that DPS has better audio quality which is something I also care about.

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a b 4 Gaming
June 18, 2013 4:00:23 PM
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jaehyun0102 said:
I don't really care about how many speaker drivers there are. I heard that DPS has better audio quality which is something I also care about.

It can go either way. Some multi-driver headphones actually sound really good. Pairing a multi-driver headset with a good DSP actually would be pretty nice ( allowing the DSP can still output multi-channel audio. )

My solution is this ( admittedly it's not the highest end way to go, but it works well for me. ) I picked up a Turtle Beach PX22 set and their DSS2. The PX22 has a four-pole connector ( normal 3.5mm jack with the fourth connector for the microphone, ) and can be plugged into anything as a normal set of non-amplified headphones with mic ( I can actually use it as a normal wired headset for my phone. ) It also comes with an inline amp so you can use it with any device ( computer, PS4, XBox, mobile devices. ) And the chat will also work over PS3, XBox, or computer.

The DSS2 has both an optical audio input and a normal 3.5mm stereo input so you can hook it up to your home theater or computer ( mobile device too, I guess, but why? ) It does a good job of emulating surround to the headphones. I got this setup because I can transfer it to just about anywhere in my house. If the wife is watching TV and I want to use the computer ( both are in the same room, ) I use the headphones and we don't disturb each other. If she's asleep and I want some late-night gaming, I can hook it up to my PS3.

It's not the best quality setup ( I'm sure you can get some better DSPs out there, ) but MSRP on the whole thing was only $150. Not a bad way to go.
June 21, 2013 5:06:24 AM

RedJaron said:
jaehyun0102 said:
I don't really care about how many speaker drivers there are. I heard that DPS has better audio quality which is something I also care about.

It can go either way. Some multi-driver headphones actually sound really good. Pairing a multi-driver headset with a good DSP actually would be pretty nice ( allowing the DSP can still output multi-channel audio. )

My solution is this ( admittedly it's not the highest end way to go, but it works well for me. ) I picked up a Turtle Beach PX22 set and their DSS2. The PX22 has a four-pole connector ( normal 3.5mm jack with the fourth connector for the microphone, ) and can be plugged into anything as a normal set of non-amplified headphones with mic ( I can actually use it as a normal wired headset for my phone. ) It also comes with an inline amp so you can use it with any device ( computer, PS4, XBox, mobile devices. ) And the chat will also work over PS3, XBox, or computer.

The DSS2 has both an optical audio input and a normal 3.5mm stereo input so you can hook it up to your home theater or computer ( mobile device too, I guess, but why? ) It does a good job of emulating surround to the headphones. I got this setup because I can transfer it to just about anywhere in my house. If the wife is watching TV and I want to use the computer ( both are in the same room, ) I use the headphones and we don't disturb each other. If she's asleep and I want some late-night gaming, I can hook it up to my PS3.

It's not the best quality setup ( I'm sure you can get some better DSPs out there, ) but MSRP on the whole thing was only $150. Not a bad way to go.


Hello,

I have been looking at the headset you recommended, but I have a big head and ears so its seems uncomfortable. Is there any other headset you would recommend that has the same specifications I required originally and some really good audio quality. Help would be really appreciated.
June 21, 2013 6:41:26 AM

songorocosongo said:
Seriously, look at the GameCom 780. It's 7.1 USB and I also have bis ears and works perfectly. When I bought them the price was $49.99, now it's $59.24. Give it a look and read the reviews.
http://www.amazon.com/Plantronics-GameCom-780-Surround-...


At first it seemed a little too bulky, but I will go look at the reviews and such. Although it seems really good I would like things like an audio controller and other things like that. Thank you!
a b 4 Gaming
June 21, 2013 7:56:23 AM

With a hat size of 7 5/8", I'd say I've got a bigger than average noggin. And given the frustration I've had getting a paintball mask with adequate coverage, I can say I understand your pain of trying to find a headset that fits well. The PX22 fits me just fine and I don't have it at its max size either. The GameCon 780 looks like a fine set too. Here are a few key differences between them:

GameCon: It's $20 cheaper than the PX22 alone and does its own sound processing meaning you don't have to buy anything else. However it can only connect over USB so it will only work with a computer (it'd probably work for voice chat over PS3, but no game/movie audio. It doesn't list XBox support, so who knows if it works there. ) The USB also will bypass your computer soundcard, so audio quality is determined by how good the 780's DSP is.

PX22: It has bigger drivers ( 50mm vs 40mm ) which usually, but not always, means better bass response and overall sound. It's also more universal as it conects to computer, PS3, XBox, and mobile devices. However it does not offer virtual sound on its own, so you'd need to get a DSS2 or something similar, which is an additional expense. The benefit of an external DSP unit is they usually have analog and igital inputs so they can be connected to a lot of devices ( computers, home theater receivers, music sources, even cell phones. )
July 24, 2013 10:47:50 AM

May i suggest just get a 5.1 headset which is good. eg. Razer Electra and download the Razer Surround sound program which will act as a 7.1
!