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Computer Turns On, doesn't Boot!

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June 19, 2013 1:19:53 PM

I need help with this computer.

My friend said he hated his old computer case, and he wanted a new one, so he got the Cooler Master Elite 430 case. He used his computer in the old case just, fine, it booted, he could play games etc. But now that I moved the computer into the new case it wont boot. Any help? I'm not sure what part of the computer is giving me problems. I tried switching the RAM into different slots, booting with no RAM, and booting with only one stick of RAM.

So the main problem is this- The computer turns on, fans run, lights turn on, the DVD Drive can open and close the tray, but it doesn't boot, it doesn't connect to the Monitor (that works just fine). I also noticed, when it is off, when I plug in the VGA cable into the GPU or the motherboard VGA port, the monitor turns on and says "Monitor is Going to Sleep", then goes to sleep.

If this helps, here are the specs


AMD Athlon x2 215

AMD Radeon HD6450 1GB

500GB Hatachi Desktar HDD Hard Drive

Cooler Master 400WT PSU

M2N68-LA Socket AM2 motherboard (Micro ATX)

Some kind of SATA DVD Drive (Don't know the name)

The case fan that comes with the case (Don't the name again).


More about : computer turns boot

June 19, 2013 1:42:01 PM

If you take out/disconnect the hard drive, video card, and try to boot it, what happens?
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June 19, 2013 1:59:31 PM

Having had the components disconnected, BIOS may have cleared if the on-board battery is dead, and settings could have reverted. You might try plugging into the on-board video to ensure output isn't being routed there. Sometimes this needs to be manually disabled.

When you installed the motherboard to the case, likely you had to install the stand-offs manually. Ensure you have them all in the correct place and that you don't have any unused ones, pressing against the back of the motherboard and shorting it out. Also, ensure you have used enough screws that the motherboard is not improperly supported and torqueing itself badly.

Verify the front panel connections, or for the purpose of troubleshooting, consider disconnecting them.

You may just wish to go back to basics and disconnect everything except for the power supply, CPU, RAM, and a video card, and then plug in one device at a time until you find the culprit.
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June 19, 2013 3:13:46 PM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
Having had the components disconnected, BIOS may have cleared if the on-board battery is dead, and settings could have reverted. You might try plugging into the on-board video to ensure output isn't being routed there. Sometimes this needs to be manually disabled.

When you installed the motherboard to the case, likely you had to install the stand-offs manually. Ensure you have them all in the correct place and that you don't have any unused ones, pressing against the back of the motherboard and shorting it out. Also, ensure you have used enough screws that the motherboard is not improperly supported and torqueing itself badly.

Verify the front panel connections, or for the purpose of troubleshooting, consider disconnecting them.

You may just wish to go back to basics and disconnect everything except for the power supply, CPU, RAM, and a video card, and then plug in one device at a time until you find the culprit.



I installed the standoffs properly and I tried disconnecting everything and plugging them in one at a time, and I think it might be my hard drive giving the problem, but I'm not sure what's wrong with it... the case has tool-free
Hard Drive installation with a screw-operator thingy that to twist the pin to lock the Hard Drive in place... so I think it's properly installed...

Any suggestions? I could try getting a new hard drive... but anything else?
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June 19, 2013 3:39:19 PM

1. A simple BIOS reset may do the job (battery off for 5-10 minutes)... Even if it's a bad hard drive. Also setting the BIOS to AHCI mode may help with a Hard Drive problem.

2. Check all the power connectors to the motheboard and drives.

3. Also check the CPU and heatsink are making snug contact...

4. Try another PSU that's known to be ok or with a new one.

5. If the hard drive is a suspect a bootable CD\DVD on the optical drive should boot and prove without a doubt the Hard Dive is the problem.

6. In the case of a bad Hard Drive the BIOS should also be decting the problem and beeping or giving a message. Also if the Hard Drive were causing the problem, the BIOS should post normally... so it's probably not the HD but more likely the PSU.
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June 19, 2013 5:47:41 PM

I have a 260WT PSU from my old rig that works as far as I know, so I'll try that and see if it feels the need to work.

And also the Bootable CD thing sounds useful.. where can I get one?

Also, I forgot to say, that the OS is Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
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June 19, 2013 8:49:28 PM

If you have the Windows installation disc, that would do.. another option is the Hiren's Boot Cd, or a Bootable Antivirus CD... but, a faster way to know is if the BIOS posts or not.. that is; if you can see the BIOS activity on the sceen or not. If you can see it, the problem is probably the Hard Drive and if the screen remains black, it probably is the Power Supply.

Links for bootable antivirus and Hiren's CDs
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June 20, 2013 12:25:57 PM

Chicano said:
If you have the Windows installation disc, that would do.. another option is the Hiren's Boot Cd, or a Bootable Antivirus CD... but, a faster way to know is if the BIOS posts or not.. that is; if you can see the BIOS activity on the sceen or not. If you can see it, the problem is probably the Hard Drive and if the screen remains black, it probably is the Power Supply.

Links for bootable antivirus and Hiren's CDs


I tried the old power supply, and even before I turn on the computer, when I hook up the VGA cable to the on board VGA or GPU VGA, it just says "Monitor is going to sleep"...

Should I try removing the GPU? Would that help the sutiation?
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June 20, 2013 12:42:49 PM

Jared Hodge said:
Chicano said:
If you have the Windows installation disc, that would do.. another option is the Hiren's Boot Cd, or a Bootable Antivirus CD... but, a faster way to know is if the BIOS posts or not.. that is; if you can see the BIOS activity on the sceen or not. If you can see it, the problem is probably the Hard Drive and if the screen remains black, it probably is the Power Supply.

Links for bootable antivirus and Hiren's CDs


I tried the old power supply, and even before I turn on the computer, when I hook up the VGA cable to the on board VGA or GPU VGA, it just says "Monitor is going to sleep"...

Should I try removing the GPU? Would that help the sutiation?


Few things to note. Discrete graphics cards(not soldered on to the motherboard) almost always over-ride the on-board graphics engine. So to use the on-board engine you will need to remove the graphics card, again "almost always". I do it just to be safe. Second, if the computer is not powered on, it can't be sending any sort of video signal to the monitor. That is why it is going into sleep mode. Thirdly, and I'm not sure if this was covered already, if you're using a VGA-DVI adapter, these trick the monitor into thinking it is plugged into an inactive graphics adapter, even if it is ONLY the vga-dvi adapter attached at the end of the cable and not connected to the actual graphics card yet. This will also put it into sleep mode.

So, if you have a VGA-DVI adapter on, take it off. Leave the monitor off and remove the graphics card. Power on the computer. With the computer on, plug the monitor cable into the video card, or adapter and then adapter to the card and see what happens. If it STILL goes directly into sleep mode...maybe try with a monitor that you know is working just fine. Or try your monitor on another computer that you know works fine.
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June 20, 2013 1:13:00 PM

Jared Hodge said:
I tried the old power supply, and even before I turn on the computer, when I hook up the VGA cable to the on board VGA or GPU VGA, it just says "Monitor is going to sleep"...

Should I try removing the GPU? Would that help the sutiation?

It might help... at least following on Zooshooter's suggestion, you have to make sure the GPU is not the problem and that's removing it to see if the onboard video takes over... you might have to reset the BIOS again to help the onboard video take over... that's after removing the GPU. Just make sure you're connecting mobo VGA to monitor VGA ports (no adapter connected), to see if the monitor's analog mode works... there's a possibility the monitor digital mode is the issue... particularly because it goes to sleep mode so soon.

EDIT If that doesn't help, try a different video cable or at least check the video cable is firmly connected to the monitor.

If still nothing, I read somewhere monitors don't have sleep mode, so if that's the case there's a possibility the power options settings are the problem so try starting the computer in Safe Mode tapping the F8 key as soon as the computer powers on... if you manage to logon, change the power options. If this isn't possible see if a bootdisc such as the Hiren's boot CD helps you access the hard drive to delete the C:\Hiberfil.sys file.
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June 20, 2013 4:44:31 PM

Chicano said:
Well apparently some monitors do have sleep mode... check this suggestion to disable it...


How to Get Your LCD Monitor Out of Sleep Mode. Follow Step 3


Ok, I am not using a VGA-DVI adapter. I know my monitor works fine, because I used it with my PS3, and it worked fine. My VGA works just fine, as I used it with my laptop and it works just fine. So it could be the GPU like you said, I heard the Radeon 6450 is a pretty sucky card, but that's not my computer, it's just at my house being tested with my monitor...
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June 20, 2013 5:47:13 PM

Okay, let's start again. This thread seems to be going in a bit of a circular pattern.

Reduce all of your variables to the absolute fewest.

I believe you stated, your friend had a computer that was working perfectly fine. Got bored with the chassis or case that it was currently in, ordered a new case, and after the parts were swapped from the one chassis to the other, it now won't work.

You really have only about two possibilities to start with, that your problem is either hardware based or software based.

1: If you're dealing with hardware based issues:

a) During the transfer, one or more components was damaged or destroyed, whether it was known at the time, through rough handling or ESD (electrostatic discharge.)

b) During the transfer, one or more components has become incorrectly installed, including add-in boards, socketed devices such as the memory and CPU, and power connectors.

c) That you have a bad ground somewhere in the build, causing flaky operation of the equipment, failure of the equipment, or a correct operation of fail-safes until the bad ground is corrected.

2: Software based:

a) Your system may have lost it's settings due to the lack of power during the parts transfer, and BIOS needs to be defaulted and then reprogrammed. BIOS relies on the button battery that is installed to the motherboard to maintain it's settings during any length of time in which the machine is not connected to mains. Not being your computer, you really have no way of knowing the state of the on-board battery. You must always assume for the purposes of trouble shooting that it's questionable.
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June 20, 2013 6:33:30 PM

If you're having no luck, here's my recommendation.

Like it or not, pull the motherboard from the chassis. Lay it on a non-conductive surface, not a silvery metallic, or anti-static bag (of course, if you put it on wood, make sure you don't care if the surface becomes scratched.)

Remove all of the RAM modules from the motherboard, noting how they feel as they are removed. Too loose, very tight, wobbly, clips half open, etc.

Consider very carefully, removing and reinstalling the CPU. If you did not do the initial installation of it, or were inexperienced at the time, I would be suspect. For this procedure, you should have handy some isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol, q-tips or perhaps a coffee filter, and new thermal interface material that you can reapply, otherwise, do not remove the heat sink from the CPU.

After you have the motherboard laid entirely bare, remove the button battery from it. Now with the battery removed, either locate the jumper for resetting the BIOS, and move it to the reset position and leave it there, for at least 60 seconds, or short the two contacts of the battery holder with something small and conductive like a butter knife or screwdriver to drain the internal capacitance of the BIOS. Either will accomplish the task, which is to reset the BIOS to defaults. When looking at the BIOS reset jumper, it's important to realize, if it's already been messed with in an attempt to remedy the non-booting computer, it's possible somebody put it into the reset position and forgot to put it back. The computer will invariably fail to boot with that little jumper in the wrong position, so small as it may be, it's critical you make sure it's where it belongs. Reinstall the battery after you have cleared the BIOS.

After resetting the BIOS, continue by verifying that the CPU slots in without much force. ZIF socketed CPUs generally drop in under their own weight, but it doesn't hurt to ensure each corner is fully seated by pressing down on them as you throw the lever down to relock the CPU into place. One or more bent pins could be the cause for the CPU not seating easily. Be extremely careful if you try to miss with a bent pin, they are obviously fragile.

After cleaning and reseating the CPU, and allowing any residual alcohol to evaporate, apply a chick-pea sized portion of the CPU paste in the center of the integrated heat spreader. Clean and reseat the heat sink and fan. The pressure of the heat sink and the thermal cycling of the CPU will spread the paste for you. Verify the CPU heat sink's fan is properly connected to the CPU pin header on the motherboard. It is possible under some conditions to have a no boot scenario, if the CPU fan is thought to be faulty by the BIOS. This will depend on the BIOS, as not all will have this behavior, but do be sure which pin header is used for the CPU fan.

Tom's Hardware instructions for properly applying thermal paste:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cooling-air-pressur...

Next, install one, and only one RAM module. If you want to be anal, look for whichever RAM slot is considered to be the #1 slot. Maybe it will be in the board's manual, maybe it will be silk-screened to the board. If you can't locate it, use the slot closest to the processor.

At this point, remove the power supply that is being used with this build from the chassis and connect it to the motherboard. It should go without saying, the power supply should be unplugged this entire time, and if you will look on the back of it, there may be visible a small toggle switch having a 0 and a 1. The switch should be in the 0 position, if present. This is mains off. When plugging the power supply in, make sure that the CPU power harness is connected. This will be either 4 or 8 pin, and located near the CPU's socket. When plugging in the main harness, use all 24 pins if possible.

Now, if the system has on-board video, you are done adding components to the system in an attempt to troubleshoot it. Plug your monitor into the on-board video output, and nothing else. Don't use an add-in graphics card, don't plug in a keyboard, or a mouse, or anything else.

Plug in the power supply, flip the switch on the back of the power supply (if present) from 0 to 1, and using a small conductive screwdriver or butter knife (whatever's handy), momentarily (about 1 second) short the two-pin contact of the front panel connector on the motherboard that would normally connect to the power switch.

You will know if you shorted the right two contacts if your CPU fan jumps slightly, or begins spinning as you would expect.

At this point, you're running the least number of variable parts, and hopefully the system POSTs, the screen turns on, and you can proceed to adding back components, one piece at a time.

If not, short the same two pins again, momentarily at first, or for up to five seconds, until the system forces itself to power down. Be careful which two pins, as you don't want to short anything else out for any length of time. If you're uncomfortable with this part, you might be best advised to retrieve an old power switch from an old, junked computer case. You can just attach the two-wire lead and push button switch for benching. :-)

Once the computer is off again, turn off the power supplies rocker switch (if present). This cuts any stand-by power that it may be providing to the board without your knowledge. If the switch is not present, unplug it. Wait perhaps 30 seconds or more for any residual capacitance in the power supply to discharge, and then you can go back to troubleshooting. Swap the one RAM module for the other. Try POSTing the motherboard again.

If you have the same results, swap the power supply for a different one, and try again.

Once you've managed to get the motherboard to post, or after exhausting all components to this point, then you may try your add-in graphics card. It should not matter which output of the add-in graphics card you use, as all should show BIOS output at the same time. Only older graphics boards required a primary screen for BIOS output. Manufacturers overcame this nuisance by just cloning all of the outputs when in certain modes.

If your add-in video card doesn't work, try another one.

Continue this until you are reasonably satisfied things are working, or are not going to.

If you finally can get nothing to boot to at least the BIOS POST screen, the next step is to start testing individual components such as the CPU, RAM, and any add-in boards in a known, working system. It's a pain, but this tells you what components are serviceable and what components are not.

Note: When installing the motherboard into the chassis, if you got little paper insulators with the package of hardware for mounting the motherboard, don't use those. Your motherboard is suppose to be fully grounded. Using those paper washers doesn't help with grounding.

Hope this helps. I'm tired of typing now.
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June 20, 2013 8:18:23 PM

Jared Hodge said:
Ok, I am not using a VGA-DVI adapter. I know my monitor works fine, because I used it with my PS3, and it worked fine. My VGA works just fine, as I used it with my laptop and it works just fine. So it could be the GPU like you said, I heard the Radeon 6450 is a pretty sucky card, but that's not my computer, it's just at my house being tested with my monitor...

1. Have you tried it with your friends monitor?
2. Did you try this monitor reset fix?

Step 3
Press the "Input" button on your LCD monitor’s front panel repeatedly at three- or four-second intervals until your monitor wakes up. If your monitor is set to an incorrect input mode, it won't receive a video signal. After you reset the monitor to the proper input mode, it will receive the signal and wake up automatically.

Read more solutions for same monitor problems.
http://www.fixya.com/support/t235850-monitor_goes_into_...
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June 20, 2013 10:34:45 PM

I agree with BigPingDragon on this. I'm quite surprised that it was so late in the discussion when this was recommended. Usually, when fans come on and there is no POST, it means either RAM or CPU have an issue. In a few cases, video card issue.

If you have a wood table or other non-conductive surface, Put the components together, outside of the case. Just the basics: CPU, PSU, MoBo, RAM, Video card. You're just trying to POST, so it's not necessary to have the HDD connected. FYI - if the system wont boot, you haven't gotten far enough to suspect the HDD is bad. So I'm doubting that is an issue. Some video cards cause an issue like this if they have an unplugged power connector. Otherwise you get a screen message telling you there's a problem with power to your video card.

There's actually quite a few MoBo's that will not POST if you have now RAM, so make sure you've got known good RAM. Try it in another system, if you can. Lastly, reseat the CPU. Check for bent pins, and damaged pads or contacts. Leave that for last resort. If you get it to POST, outside of the case, there would be something making contact somewhere. I've seen one person lay down a sheet of paper and then mount the MoBo to the case with the paper acting like an insulator.

Please post results of what you discover.
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June 21, 2013 12:56:58 PM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
If you're having no luck, here's my recommendation.

Like it or not, pull the motherboard from the chassis. Lay it on a non-conductive surface, not a silvery metallic, or anti-static bag (of course, if you put it on wood, make sure you don't care if the surface becomes scratched.)

Remove all of the RAM modules from the motherboard, noting how they feel as they are removed. Too loose, very tight, wobbly, clips half open, etc.

Consider very carefully, removing and reinstalling the CPU. If you did not do the initial installation of it, or were inexperienced at the time, I would be suspect. For this procedure, you should have handy some isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol, q-tips or perhaps a coffee filter, and new thermal interface material that you can reapply, otherwise, do not remove the heat sink from the CPU.

After you have the motherboard laid entirely bare, remove the button battery from it. Now with the battery removed, either locate the jumper for resetting the BIOS, and move it to the reset position and leave it there, for at least 60 seconds, or short the two contacts of the battery holder with something small and conductive like a butter knife or screwdriver to drain the internal capacitance of the BIOS. Either will accomplish the task, which is to reset the BIOS to defaults. When looking at the BIOS reset jumper, it's important to realize, if it's already been messed with in an attempt to remedy the non-booting computer, it's possible somebody put it into the reset position and forgot to put it back. The computer will invariably fail to boot with that little jumper in the wrong position, so small as it may be, it's critical you make sure it's where it belongs. Reinstall the battery after you have cleared the BIOS.

After resetting the BIOS, continue by verifying that the CPU slots in without much force. ZIF socketed CPUs generally drop in under their own weight, but it doesn't hurt to ensure each corner is fully seated by pressing down on them as you throw the lever down to relock the CPU into place. One or more bent pins could be the cause for the CPU not seating easily. Be extremely careful if you try to miss with a bent pin, they are obviously fragile.

After cleaning and reseating the CPU, and allowing any residual alcohol to evaporate, apply a chick-pea sized portion of the CPU paste in the center of the integrated heat spreader. Clean and reseat the heat sink and fan. The pressure of the heat sink and the thermal cycling of the CPU will spread the paste for you. Verify the CPU heat sink's fan is properly connected to the CPU pin header on the motherboard. It is possible under some conditions to have a no boot scenario, if the CPU fan is thought to be faulty by the BIOS. This will depend on the BIOS, as not all will have this behavior, but do be sure which pin header is used for the CPU fan.

Tom's Hardware instructions for properly applying thermal paste:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cooling-air-pressur...

Next, install one, and only one RAM module. If you want to be anal, look for whichever RAM slot is considered to be the #1 slot. Maybe it will be in the board's manual, maybe it will be silk-screened to the board. If you can't locate it, use the slot closest to the processor.

At this point, remove the power supply that is being used with this build from the chassis and connect it to the motherboard. It should go without saying, the power supply should be unplugged this entire time, and if you will look on the back of it, there may be visible a small toggle switch having a 0 and a 1. The switch should be in the 0 position, if present. This is mains off. When plugging the power supply in, make sure that the CPU power harness is connected. This will be either 4 or 8 pin, and located near the CPU's socket. When plugging in the main harness, use all 24 pins if possible.

Now, if the system has on-board video, you are done adding components to the system in an attempt to troubleshoot it. Plug your monitor into the on-board video output, and nothing else. Don't use an add-in graphics card, don't plug in a keyboard, or a mouse, or anything else.

Plug in the power supply, flip the switch on the back of the power supply (if present) from 0 to 1, and using a small conductive screwdriver or butter knife (whatever's handy), momentarily (about 1 second) short the two-pin contact of the front panel connector on the motherboard that would normally connect to the power switch.

You will know if you shorted the right two contacts if your CPU fan jumps slightly, or begins spinning as you would expect.

At this point, you're running the least number of variable parts, and hopefully the system POSTs, the screen turns on, and you can proceed to adding back components, one piece at a time.

If not, short the same two pins again, momentarily at first, or for up to five seconds, until the system forces itself to power down. Be careful which two pins, as you don't want to short anything else out for any length of time. If you're uncomfortable with this part, you might be best advised to retrieve an old power switch from an old, junked computer case. You can just attach the two-wire lead and push button switch for benching. :-)

Once the computer is off again, turn off the power supplies rocker switch (if present). This cuts any stand-by power that it may be providing to the board without your knowledge. If the switch is not present, unplug it. Wait perhaps 30 seconds or more for any residual capacitance in the power supply to discharge, and then you can go back to troubleshooting. Swap the one RAM module for the other. Try POSTing the motherboard again.

If you have the same results, swap the power supply for a different one, and try again.

Once you've managed to get the motherboard to post, or after exhausting all components to this point, then you may try your add-in graphics card. It should not matter which output of the add-in graphics card you use, as all should show BIOS output at the same time. Only older graphics boards required a primary screen for BIOS output. Manufacturers overcame this nuisance by just cloning all of the outputs when in certain modes.

If your add-in video card doesn't work, try another one.

Continue this until you are reasonably satisfied things are working, or are not going to.

If you finally can get nothing to boot to at least the BIOS POST screen, the next step is to start testing individual components such as the CPU, RAM, and any add-in boards in a known, working system. It's a pain, but this tells you what components are serviceable and what components are not.

Note: When installing the motherboard into the chassis, if you got little paper insulators with the package of hardware for mounting the motherboard, don't use those. Your motherboard is suppose to be fully grounded. Using those paper washers doesn't help with grounding.

Hope this helps. I'm tired of typing now.


Lol, but I'm not sure if I'm brave enough to mess up my friends computer with all the shorting nonsense, but if it were mine, I would do it, so... I will try reseating the CPU, taking out the GPU, diskconnecting the HDD, using one stick of RAM and see what happens, as well as resetting the BIOS.
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Best solution

June 21, 2013 1:13:27 PM

Well, do what you're comfortable with. I certainly wouldn't want you to cause more troubles than already exist! :-) Shorting is the fastest method when benching. If you're unsure, like I said, you can always scrounge an old power switch from an old case and just plug it in to the two pins of the pin header for the front panel power switch. All the power switch does is short those two pins for the duration of time you hold the power button.

Good catch Doramius! I forgot about add-in board, PCI-e power requirements, but thankfully there's no need to worry about that on an HD6450.

As for shorting the battery connection on the mainboard, I find that the most reliable method of clearing BIOS. It is generally an instant method, whereas the jumper is not guaranteed to be instant, but usually is. I'm not a fan of usually, if you know what I mean. Shorting the battery holder leads is perfectly safe. This should always be done with power to mains disconnected, so we're talking about draining microvolts or less.
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June 22, 2013 8:08:54 AM

I reset the BIOS, for me it was simple, I just took out the battery. Lol. Thanks to all you guys for the help and tips! I am proud to say, his computer is done.
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June 22, 2013 8:40:10 AM

Cool, glad you got it working again, and it was an easy fix! :-)
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June 22, 2013 12:13:40 PM

On June 19, 2013 (3 hours after the opening post) Chicano said:

Quote:
1. A simple BIOS reset may do the job (battery off for 5-10 minutes)...


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