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How to predetermine DPC latency

Last response: in Components
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June 19, 2013 1:20:02 PM

After a dorment period of 6 years I'm finally going to build a PC again. This time a DAW PC to be precise. Obviously DPC latency is something I want to avoid.

Now I know what can cause it and I know how to find it and I know how to eliminate it but what I don't know -and to my astonishment I cannot find a single clue on the web- is how to prevent it when choosing your components.

All I could find is that solely based on real life experience some hardware doesn't like each other but as my new build centers around the new Haswell there is yet little to find.

So my question is 'How can I tell upfront if certain combined components will cause DPC latency?'

June 19, 2013 1:49:47 PM

For starters, most consumers of equipment wouldn't even know what DPC is. Second, the DPC of each piece of equipment changes, depending on the configuration it's installed in so the numbers would only be relevant if you ran the equipment identically to the test platform.
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June 20, 2013 5:35:52 AM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
For starters, most consumers of equipment wouldn't even know what DPC is. Second, the DPC of each piece of equipment changes, depending on the configuration it's installed in so the numbers would only be relevant if you ran the equipment identically to the test platform.


So what you're saying is there's no way of knowing upfront if certain configurations will give DPC latency issues?
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Best solution

June 20, 2013 7:59:21 AM

Correct. Your best solution is to stick to reputable equipment designed for the task you're trying to accomplish, and build toward any recommendations the manufacturers of that equipment might make. Even that is not a guarantee, just a best shot. Every combination of hardware and software will bench differently, so you're really just aiming for something that is "good enough" for your purposes. Windows is not a real-time operating system but instead runs most equipment in an interrupt based fashion, and I would suspect the same of Mac's OS as well, but generally they are more than sufficient to get the job done, provided they are purpose built machines without the usual clutter and poor performance choices associated with off the shelf, name brand machines. :-)
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June 20, 2013 8:12:55 AM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
Correct. Your best solution is to stick to reputable equipment designed for the task you're trying to accomplish, and build toward any recommendations the manufacturers of that equipment might make. Even that is not a guarantee, just a best shot. Every combination of hardware and software will bench differently, so you're really just aiming for something that is "good enough" for your purposes. Windows is not a real-time operating system but instead runs most equipment in an interrupt based fashion, and I would suspect the same of Mac's OS as well, but generally they are more than sufficient to get the job done, provided they are purpose built machines without the usual clutter and poor performance choices associated with off the shelf, name brand machines. :-)


Well, that makes sense regarding the fact dedicated DAW builders only have a limited options for interchangeable hardware -as they have proven to work nicely with each other. Guess I'll be facing some boring and timeconsuming testruns after the build. Anyway, thanks for clearing that up!
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