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Is a 60GB SSD enough for Windows 7 and a few other programs?

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June 21, 2013 5:45:18 PM

I do Exede internet installations, and use my Asus laptop to set it up, so it goes in and out of my truck quite a bit, so I'm going to install an SSD, after transferring an image of the current HDD. It's a matter of time before the HHD suffers from all the movement, and the faster boot up will be nice too.

That being said, I don't use this laptop for much, besides work, so it doesn't need much beyond the OS, which is Windows 7. Right now it has a 320GB, 5400 rpm hard drive, and I'm thinking of using either this
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006VCP72W/ref=ox_sc_s...

but I'm wondering if I'm pushing it, as far as being too small? I've heard that the general rule of thumb is not to go beyond 80% of capacity.

Like I said.....I use it to do my Exede installs, and it has a few other programs, but it's very minimal.

On that note......my current HDD is partitioned from the factory, and it shows up as
OS ( C: ) 79.7GB free of 119GB
and
DATA ( D: ) 153GB free of153GB
so how will that work if I clone it and put it on a 60GB SSD?

I'm assuming it will simply show about 20GB free of 60GB, and no "D Drive"??, or will it partition the new SSD?? Hope I explained that right.

Would it be easier to just delete the D drive, as there is nothing on it, and just expand the C Drive to one big drive, then clone the drive???

My main question is regarding the 60GB SSD being big enough, especially with what I use the computer for, but I am curious about tha partition issue as well.

If not, I will go with this
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BQ4F9ZA/ref=ox_sc_s...

Any feedback or input of any kind IMMENSELY appreciated!!

Thanks in advance!


June 21, 2013 6:05:01 PM

I never recommend less than 128GB
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a c 258 D Laptop
a c 750 G Storage
a c 518 $ Windows 7
June 21, 2013 6:05:39 PM

Yeah, the 60GB will work, mostly. But you'll be sweating the free space needed for the TRIM function.

The price difference between a 60 and a 128 (Samsung 840 at Amazon) is about $40-$50. For me, the $50 is worth not having to think about it. Especially in a business environment.
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June 21, 2013 6:16:19 PM

USAFRet said:
Yeah, the 60GB will work, mostly. But you'll be sweating the free space needed for the TRIM function.

The price difference between a 60 and a 128 (Samsung 840 at Amazon) is about $40-$50. For me, the $50 is worth not having to think about it. Especially in a business environment.


I appreciate that, and I do agree. I was trying to save a few bucks. I might add that when I set up these customers with internet, I'm using nothing more than a browser. Other than work, I might check email, surf the net...very little. But yeah......just having to not think about it is a good idea. I'd no sooner put the 60 in, and have some need for more space......murphy's law.

Do you have any advice on the partition thing on my current HDD?
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June 21, 2013 6:21:07 PM

Is this the one you're referring to?
http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-120GB-internal-Solid-MZ-7...

I have an Intel 520 series 120GB in my desktop, and a I terabyte Western Digital HDD as well.

I was thinking of the Crucial that I linked to in my first post, as it's cheaper than the Intel, but does the Samsung have a good reputation?
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a c 258 D Laptop
a c 750 G Storage
a c 518 $ Windows 7
June 21, 2013 6:29:44 PM

soulweeper said:


Do you have any advice on the partition thing on my current HDD?


Cloning and the existing partition scheme...I never recommend cloning from a HDD to a new SDD.
New install of Windows and whatever applications it needs.

The existing D is almost certainly a recovery partition. The existing C has whatever crap/bloatware it came with.

Cloning the existing C & D partitions to a 60GB (or even 128) probably won't work.
Download an ISO for the OS from Microsoft, install using the valid key, and love life with the SSD.
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a c 258 D Laptop
a c 750 G Storage
a c 518 $ Windows 7
June 21, 2013 6:32:29 PM

soulweeper said:
Is this the one you're referring to?
http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-120GB-internal-Solid-MZ-7...

I have an Intel 520 series 120GB in my desktop, and a I terabyte Western Digital HDD as well.

I was thinking of the Crucial that I linked to in my first post, as it's cheaper than the Intel, but does the Samsung have a good reputation?


The Samsung 840 Pro is the currently recognized 'best option'.
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June 21, 2013 6:58:35 PM

USAFRet said:
soulweeper said:


Do you have any advice on the partition thing on my current HDD?


Cloning and the existing partition scheme...I never recommend cloning from a HDD to a new SDD.
New install of Windows and whatever applications it needs.

The existing D is almost certainly a recovery partition. The existing C has whatever crap/bloatware it came with.

Cloning the existing C & D partitions to a 60GB (or even 128) probably won't work.
Download an ISO for the OS from Microsoft, install using the valid key, and love life with the SSD.


Mind if I ask why you don't recommend cloning from an HDD to an SSD? Isn't an image an image? When I talked to the people at Crucial, they said all I'd need is this
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002EUCU3O/ref=ox_sc_s...
and my new SSD.

And cloning the existing partitions won't work, like you said, but what if I deleted the D partition on the HDD, and expanded the C to one drive.....wouldn't it work then?

Well, if I download an ISO from microsoft, my current key will simply work, correct? Can I simply download an ISO for free from Microsoft? If so.....what about the drivers for my network card, and basic things like that? I built my first computer last year, but I had a cd that came with my motherboard that had all my drivers and whatnot, so I'm not exactly sure what I'd need to do after installing the fresh copy of Windows. I like the idea of getting rid of all the crap that Asus has on it, but like when I built my computer, I could see the hard drives, but couldn't access them......something like that. It was new to me, and a guy from Asus tech support walked me through it.

It's funny......some people are huge fans of disc imaging, and others aren't like yourself. in the middle......I just don't know.

To be honest, I'd like to just put the SSD in, and install a new copy of 7, and just get the basics like Flash, Adobe reader, etc. etc, and be done with it, but I want it to just work after I install it.
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a c 258 D Laptop
a c 750 G Storage
a c 518 $ Windows 7
June 21, 2013 7:14:59 PM

Yes, and ISO downloaded from MS, along with your existing key, will work perfectly.

I don't recommend a clone from existing HDD to a smaller SSD, because you are dragging along a lot of old, unnecessary crap.
With the smaller SSD, some apps should be installed on it, and some not. The clone scenario prevents that choice.
For instance, on a gaming machine - other than load times, game play does not really benefit from being on the SSD. And because they can be huge, significant space is used up for nothing. So the 'games should probably be installed elsewhere.

In your situation, the OS and a couple of critical apps will go on the SDD. Documents and other stuff on an HDD. But splitting that pre-clone is a PITA. Easier/faster to just install fresh, and divide stuff as you desire.

A Windows installation is not just the Windows folder, but also all the entries existing in the Registry, AppData, and elsewhere. ALL of that is part of the Windows installation, and will be cloned/migrated to the new drive.

Just reading through questions here on Toms...."I cloned my drive to the SSD and now things are f'ed up! HELP!" is far more prevalent than "I installed fresh on the SSD, followed all the guidelines, and things are F'ed up!"

It works, mostly. But I see a far greater chance of failure than doing it the other way.
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June 21, 2013 8:02:52 PM

USAFRet said:
Yes, and ISO downloaded from MS, along with your existing key, will work perfectly.

I don't recommend a clone from existing HDD to a smaller SSD, because you are dragging along a lot of old, unnecessary crap.
With the smaller SSD, some apps should be installed on it, and some not. The clone scenario prevents that choice.
For instance, on a gaming machine - other than load times, game play does not really benefit from being on the SSD. And because they can be huge, significant space is used up for nothing. So the 'games should probably be installed elsewhere.

In your situation, the OS and a couple of critical apps will go on the SDD. Documents and other stuff on an HDD. But splitting that pre-clone is a PITA. Easier/faster to just install fresh, and divide stuff as you desire.

A Windows installation is not just the Windows folder, but also all the entries existing in the Registry, AppData, and elsewhere. ALL of that is part of the Windows installation, and will be cloned/migrated to the new drive.

Just reading through questions here on Toms...."I cloned my drive to the SSD and now things are f'ed up! HELP!" is far more prevalent than "I installed fresh on the SSD, followed all the guidelines, and things are F'ed up!"

It works, mostly. But I see a far greater chance of failure than doing it the other way.

Ok, but I'm doing this on a laptop, so there won't be any splitting up of anything between an SSD and HDD....it's all going to the same place.

I would definitely rather install a fresh copy of Windows 7, and put only what I want on it, but remembering when I built my desktop last year, after I installed Windows 7 from an ISO I had, I had the operating system but for example, I couldn't access the internet......my network card needed drivers and whatnot....as did other things. That's my concern.....as I do ok with computers, but I'm not an "expert". I don't want to get stuck with this new copy of Windows 7 on a new SSD, but can't use all the functions. I don't have a "drivers" disc to grab.

In a nutshell.....installing the SSD and putting a new copy of Windows 7 on it is fine, but what will I need to do after that, and how do I do it? That's all I need to know. I hope that makes sense. :) 
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a c 258 D Laptop
a c 750 G Storage
a c 518 $ Windows 7
June 21, 2013 8:10:00 PM

soulweeper said:


I would definitely rather install a fresh copy of Windows 7, and put only what I want on it, but remembering when I built my desktop last year, after I installed Windows 7 from an ISO I had, I had the operating system but for example, I couldn't access the internet......my network card needed drivers and whatnot....as did other things. That's my concern.....as I do ok with computers, but I'm not an "expert". I don't want to get stuck with this new copy of Windows 7 on a new SSD, but can't use all the functions. I don't have a "drivers" disc to grab.

In a nutshell.....installing the SSD and putting a new copy of Windows 7 on it is fine, but what will I need to do after that, and how do I do it? That's all I need to know. I hope that makes sense. :) 


Gather all the needed drivers before. Put them on a thumbdrive. Once Windows is installed (on the SSD), install the drivers from that thumb drive. Network driver first.
I do it that way all the time. Get the specific drivers for your hardware before any major change, just in case.
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June 21, 2013 8:17:37 PM

USAFRet said:
soulweeper said:


I would definitely rather install a fresh copy of Windows 7, and put only what I want on it, but remembering when I built my desktop last year, after I installed Windows 7 from an ISO I had, I had the operating system but for example, I couldn't access the internet......my network card needed drivers and whatnot....as did other things. That's my concern.....as I do ok with computers, but I'm not an "expert". I don't want to get stuck with this new copy of Windows 7 on a new SSD, but can't use all the functions. I don't have a "drivers" disc to grab.

In a nutshell.....installing the SSD and putting a new copy of Windows 7 on it is fine, but what will I need to do after that, and how do I do it? That's all I need to know. I hope that makes sense. :) 


Gather all the needed drivers before. Put them on a thumbdrive. Once Windows is installed (on the SSD), install the drivers from that thumb drive. Network driver first.
I do it that way all the time. Get the specific drivers for your hardware before any major change, just in case.


Ok......but as much as I hate to ask, where do I look for a "list" of the hardware on my laptop? Amazon doesn't exactly get that specific, and I did a google search earlier for the specs, but I didn't find anything about the hardware it's built with. I'd need primarily the drivers for the network card, and what else? It's an ASUS A53E-ES92.
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a c 258 D Laptop
a c 750 G Storage
a c 518 $ Windows 7
June 21, 2013 8:30:52 PM

soulweeper said:
USAFRet said:
soulweeper said:


I would definitely rather install a fresh copy of Windows 7, and put only what I want on it, but remembering when I built my desktop last year, after I installed Windows 7 from an ISO I had, I had the operating system but for example, I couldn't access the internet......my network card needed drivers and whatnot....as did other things. That's my concern.....as I do ok with computers, but I'm not an "expert". I don't want to get stuck with this new copy of Windows 7 on a new SSD, but can't use all the functions. I don't have a "drivers" disc to grab.

In a nutshell.....installing the SSD and putting a new copy of Windows 7 on it is fine, but what will I need to do after that, and how do I do it? That's all I need to know. I hope that makes sense. :) 


Gather all the needed drivers before. Put them on a thumbdrive. Once Windows is installed (on the SSD), install the drivers from that thumb drive. Network driver first.
I do it that way all the time. Get the specific drivers for your hardware before any major change, just in case.


Ok......but as much as I hate to ask, where do I look for a "list" of the hardware on my laptop? Amazon doesn't exactly get that specific, and I did a google search earlier for the specs, but I didn't find anything about the hardware it's built with. I'd need primarily the drivers for the network card, and what else? It's an ASUS A53E-ES92.


Always go to the manufacturer for that stuff.
A53E drivers here, and select the OS.
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a c 78 G Storage
June 21, 2013 8:53:28 PM

You should be able to clone the HDD to your ssd, no problems. I've done it several times. All your MB drivers, etc will be installed. Some manufacturers even provide cloning kits to do just that for their ssd's. Once cloned, install your ssd into the boot drive's slot. Don't worry about the other drive. It will function like it did with your old HDD boot drive. You will have less than 20GB of free space on the ssd, I'd bet. Don't know if that will be enough in the long run.
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June 21, 2013 9:36:41 PM

spooky2th said:
You should be able to clone the HDD to your ssd, no problems. I've done it several times. All your MB drivers, etc will be installed. Some manufacturers even provide cloning kits to do just that for their ssd's. Once cloned, install your ssd into the boot drive's slot. Don't worry about the other drive. It will function like it did with your old HDD boot drive. You will have less than 20GB of free space on the ssd, I'd bet. Don't know if that will be enough in the long run.


Don't worry about which other drive....the "D" drive that is actually just a partition? If it's that easy, I'm all for it.

But at the same time, I wouldn't mind not having a bunch of the crap that Asus puts on there.
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June 21, 2013 9:49:24 PM

USAFRet said:
soulweeper said:
USAFRet said:
soulweeper said:


I would definitely rather install a fresh copy of Windows 7, and put only what I want on it, but remembering when I built my desktop last year, after I installed Windows 7 from an ISO I had, I had the operating system but for example, I couldn't access the internet......my network card needed drivers and whatnot....as did other things. That's my concern.....as I do ok with computers, but I'm not an "expert". I don't want to get stuck with this new copy of Windows 7 on a new SSD, but can't use all the functions. I don't have a "drivers" disc to grab.

In a nutshell.....installing the SSD and putting a new copy of Windows 7 on it is fine, but what will I need to do after that, and how do I do it? That's all I need to know. I hope that makes sense. :) 


Gather all the needed drivers before. Put them on a thumbdrive. Once Windows is installed (on the SSD), install the drivers from that thumb drive. Network driver first.
I do it that way all the time. Get the specific drivers for your hardware before any major change, just in case.


Ok......but as much as I hate to ask, where do I look for a "list" of the hardware on my laptop? Amazon doesn't exactly get that specific, and I did a google search earlier for the specs, but I didn't find anything about the hardware it's built with. I'd need primarily the drivers for the network card, and what else? It's an ASUS A53E-ES92.


Always go to the manufacturer for that stuff.
A53E drivers here, and select the OS.


Thanks.

But now I'm really confused.....on that page, there are multiple versions of many of them, so I assume I'd download that latest version of whatever one I wanted, but my main question is.....would I need all the drivers on that page, if starting from scratch?
For example.....look at "others"....there are 6 different things right there alone. Do I get all 6 of those? I guess everything that is on that page goes on the Asus A53 laptop, yes?
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a c 78 G Storage
June 21, 2013 9:51:10 PM

Delete/uninstall the crap before you clone the drive. Or just install an ssd and reinstall windows from scratch. You will have to install the MB drivers too. I'd get all the latest versions from the manufacturer's web site before cloning. Store them on a USB drive or even a R/W DVD so you will have them after windows is installed. You're gonna have to install all your programs that you had on the computer too.
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June 22, 2013 9:21:43 AM

spooky2th said:
Delete/uninstall the crap before you clone the drive. Or just install an ssd and reinstall windows from scratch. You will have to install the MB drivers too. I'd get all the latest versions from the manufacturer's web site before cloning. Store them on a USB drive or even a R/W DVD so you will have them after windows is installed. You're gonna have to install all your programs that you had on the computer too.


Yeah, I know about installing my programs. I don't have much on there....it's mainly for my Exede installs, so that part will be no big deal.

I don't mind installing from scratch, but here's my biggest concern. I built a new computer last year, but the motherboard came with a cd that had all my drivers, so it was easy. Doing it from scratch because I'm replacing the HDD with an SSD is new to me, and a bit more intimidating, which is why the cloning seems easier. But at the same time, having less crap on the computer would also be nice.
That being said.....I'm assuming every driver I would possibly need would be on the Asus web site, on that page I linked to, correct? It's for the A53 series laptop. And that's where the motherboard drivers are as well, yes?

What I don't understand is.....there are several versions of many of them, so I guess I would get whatever latest version is available of any given driver, correct?

Not only that, would I get every single driver on that page?

That's where I get a little confused, but mainly because I just haven't done it.

Thanks in advance!

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June 22, 2013 9:47:23 AM

For example....in this screenshot
http://imgur.com/JfSuEUa
do I need all of them?

And in this screenshot (this is under "utilities")
http://imgur.com/LFcchMq
I know I don't need the Asus facelogon utility.....so what I'm getting at is, how the heck do I get just what I need if I install windows 7 from scratch?
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a c 78 G Storage
June 22, 2013 12:50:12 PM

Just go thru the drivers and pick the latest one from each. LAN is for your port that is connected to the Modem. Audio is self explanatory. USB, chipset, touchpad and others are needed so that your laptop will work correctly. What you probably do not need is the Utilities. After installing the drivers, go into Device Manager and make sure there are now yellow warning flags on anything. These flags mean no driver or a corrupted/badly installed driver. You should be able to find the driver for each device that's on your laptop.

Edit:
If you used or want to any of those utilities, then install the ones you want. They can always be installed at a later time too.
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June 22, 2013 1:10:56 PM

spooky2th said:
Just go thru the drivers and pick the latest one from each. LAN is for your port that is connected to the Modem. Audio is self explanatory. USB, chipset, touchpad and others are needed so that your laptop will work correctly. What you probably do not need is the Utilities. After installing the drivers, go into Device Manager and make sure there are now yellow warning flags on anything. These flags mean no driver or a corrupted/badly installed driver. You should be able to find the driver for each device that's on your laptop.

Edit:
If you used or want to any of those utilities, then install the ones you want. They can always be installed at a later time too.

Yeah....I knew about LAN and touchpad and a few others, just wasn't sure if I'd get everything. I see what you're saying as far as utilities.....I can probably look at the list, and some stuff will be obvious that I don't have or need/want it, so simply don't bet it, correct?

Everything else, I can just get the latest version of, and put all of it on a thumb drive.

That being said.....would I simply install Windows 7 after installing the new SSD, and then simply install all the drivers I've put on the thumb drive, onto the laptop?

As far as using the activation key that came with the laptop....I can get an ISO online, and obviously I'd get the Windows 7, 64 bit, because that's what came with the laptop.....and it should work, correct?

The reason I ask is, I have an ISO of Windows 7 Ultimate, but the key from my laptop won't work for that, correct?
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June 22, 2013 1:16:05 PM

Here's another example of what I'm talking about. Look at this screenshot
http://imgur.com/V0iewUL

I don't even know what that is, or if I need it. Not only that, just in that category, they're all different. That is what is confusing me.

Even the LAN drivers....there are 3 different ones, and the one in the middle is a pretty big file compare to the other two
http://imgur.com/3AW6wsS

It's the same with the BIOS
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a c 78 G Storage
June 22, 2013 4:33:14 PM

You probably don't need any of the email & safety group. There are two Lan drivers that have the same description. I would just install the latest one and if your laptop has wireless abilities, then also the larger middle driver. Download all three though. After installing, if there is a yellow flag on your Lan in drivers you might need to install the third one, but I doubt it.

Your activation code should work. As long as it is the same MB there shouldn't be any problems. Somewhere at the beginning of windows install it will ask for the activation code. You can skip it and do it later but I almost always input it when asked. Windows will activate while on-line after three days or so.

All you need to install is the OS, MB drivers and your personal programs and you will have a lean OS while saving some drive space too.

In BIOS, for better R/W speeds with a SSD, set your system to AHCI before the install. Like right after you have installed the SSD, go into BIOS first, set it up and then boot with your Windows install software.
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June 22, 2013 4:38:10 PM

spooky2th said:
You probably don't need any of the email & safety group. There are two Lan drivers that have the same description. I would just install the latest one and if your laptop has wireless abilities, then also the larger middle driver. Download all three though. After installing, if there is a yellow flag on your Lan in drivers you might need to install the third one, but I doubt it.

Your activation code should work. As long as it is the same MB there shouldn't be any problems. Somewhere at the beginning of windows install it will ask for the activation code. You can skip it and do it later but I almost always input it when asked. Windows will activate while on-line after three days or so.

All you need to install is the OS, MB drivers and your personal programs and you will have a lean OS while saving some drive space too.

In BIOS, for better R/W speeds with a SSD, set your system to AHCI before the install. Like right after you have installed the SSD, go into BIOS first, set it up and then boot with your Windows install software.


Yes, I did the AHCI setting when I built my desktop. Which of those are the motherboard drivers?
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a c 78 G Storage
June 22, 2013 4:41:00 PM

Your MB drivers are the Lan, audio, chipset, usb and etc. All the drivers that make the devices on your MB & system work. Go into device manager and you will see what you have now.
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June 22, 2013 4:46:43 PM

spooky2th said:
Your MB drivers are the Lan, audio, chipset, usb and etc. All the drivers that make the devices on your MB & system work. Go into device manager and you will see what you have now.


Ah gotcha......drew a blank on that one, sorry. Would I need to download any of the BIOS drivers, you think.


So I'd basically remove the HDD, install the SSD, boot into BIOS, set it to AHCI, then boot to my ISO disc, install windows, then install all my drivers, yes>

I thought I read something about initializing a hard drive before installing it....something like that. What's that about?
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a c 78 G Storage
June 22, 2013 4:55:14 PM

You don't need to update your BIOS. But it is something to think about later on down the road. If your system is working like it should, there's no need. BIOS updates can be tricky and if you make a mistake you can "brick" your computer and the only recourse would be to send it back to ASUS.

You should be able to install your ssd and load windows right away. Windows should see it. Let Windows give it a quick format at the beginning of the install, then install. I've got 10 ssd installs under my belt and windows has always done the job.

Edit:
Yes, those are the basic steps. But if your system is already in AHCI, you can skip entering the BIOS.
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June 22, 2013 5:33:38 PM

spooky2th said:
You don't need to update your BIOS. But it is something to think about later on down the road. If your system is working like it should, there's no need. BIOS updates can be tricky and if you make a mistake you can "brick" your computer and the only recourse would be to send it back to ASUS.

You should be able to install your ssd and load windows right away. Windows should see it. Let Windows give it a quick format at the beginning of the install, then install. I've got 10 ssd installs under my belt and windows has always done the job.

Edit:
Yes, those are the basic steps. But if your system is already in AHCI, you can skip entering the BIOS.


Well, that was my desktop that I set to AHCI. My laptop is only a year old, but given that it's got a HDD, it's probably not, right?

Ok....so ignore the BIOS drivers, just get MB drivers, install the SSD, install Windows, and it should see the SSD, yes? By default, will it name it "C"

When I build my desktop, the guy from ASUS had me do something with the SSD and HDD, and I named them. I can't remember what we did, but I couldn't see them at first....something like that. I can't recall exactly what that was about.

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a c 78 G Storage
June 22, 2013 7:28:47 PM

If you are not sure if your laptop is set for AHCI or not, it wouldn't hurt to check before the windows install.

Check the web site of the ssd that you will be getting. There should be some info on how to install it. What you should or should not do.
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June 22, 2013 7:35:35 PM

spooky2th said:
If you are not sure if your laptop is set for AHCI or not, it wouldn't hurt to check before the windows install.

Check the web site of the ssd that you will be getting. There should be some info on how to install it. What you should or should not do.


Yeah, I'm getting either this
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006VCP7YA/ref=ox_sc_s...
or this
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BQ4F9ZA/ref=ox_sc_s...

Probably the M500....save a few bucks, still get 120GB

Probably a dumb question, but does it matter if the SSD I get is SATA III or 6, or whatever? I have no idea what the port on the motherboard is, but as longs as it's SATA, it doesn't matter, correct?
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a c 78 G Storage
June 22, 2013 7:40:25 PM

Sata III and 6GBs are the same types of drives. Yes, get a sata 3 instead of a sata 2. Unless your laptop only has sata 2 speeds, then you will only get sata 2 speeds even with a sata 3 ssd.
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June 22, 2013 7:48:07 PM

spooky2th said:
Sata III and 6GBs are the same types of drives. Yes, get a sata 3 instead of a sata 2. Unless your laptop only has sata 2 speeds, then you will only get sata 2 speeds even with a sata 3 ssd.


How would I find out what speeds it has?

I'm also in the BIOS right now, and can't remember where I would check to see if it's set to AHCI.
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June 22, 2013 7:51:11 PM

Found it....it's set to AHCI already.
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June 22, 2013 8:24:40 PM

This may sound like another dumb question but....I noticed they have drivers on the Asus site for USB 3.0, and my laptop has 2.0 and 3.0, so I'm assuming the 2.0 will work with the new SSD, without any drivers needed? I started wondering how I'd install drivers from a thumb drive if the USB port doesn't work
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a c 78 G Storage
June 22, 2013 8:41:11 PM

Windows will install a basic driver when you install a usb device. Your 2.0 usb driver is probably included in the chipset and the 3.0 usb is separate and might not work until you install the driver.

You can find out if you have sata 3 or sata 2 in your specs on web site where your drivers are. What is your laptop's model and manufacturer?
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June 22, 2013 9:09:15 PM

spooky2th said:
Windows will install a basic driver when you install a usb device. Your 2.0 usb driver is probably included in the chipset and the 3.0 usb is separate and might not work until you install the driver.

You can find out if you have sata 3 or sata 2 in your specs on web site where your drivers are. What is your laptop's model and manufacturer?

ASUS A53E-ES92

I couldn't find any specs that would tell me that.
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a c 78 G Storage
June 23, 2013 8:15:11 AM

I didn't see anything either. Your laptop is probably only sata 2. Especially since it has a slow 5400RPM HDD in it.
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June 23, 2013 8:56:48 AM

spooky2th said:
I didn't see anything either. Your laptop is probably only sata 2. Especially since it has a slow 5400RPM HDD in it.

Yeah....I was gonna say, just that alone tells you how much improvement there will be, switching to SSD. Even though I don't demand anything at all from the laptop. My main concern is the vibration from riding in my truck all the time. I drive some pretty nasty roads sometimes too. Plus, just the fast boot up will be helpful, getting out of a house a little quicker.

I'm still contemplating the 60GB Intel 520 series
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006VCP72W/ref=ox_sc_s...

over the 120GB Crucial
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BQ4F9ZA/ref=ox_sc_s...

only because the 60GB is within my budget, and still Intel. They have a good reputation, and I have the 120GB in my desktop, but it's a little pricey...otherwise I'd just get it.

I probably should just get the crucial.
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a c 78 G Storage
June 23, 2013 9:02:48 AM

With a sata 2 comp it probably won't make much difference in speed between the two.
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June 23, 2013 9:24:53 AM

spooky2th said:
With a sata 2 comp it probably won't make much difference in speed between the two.


You mean between the Crucial and Intel, or between an SSD and the 5400RPM HDD that's in there?
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a c 78 G Storage
June 23, 2013 9:27:17 AM

Between the two ssd's.
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June 23, 2013 9:37:39 AM

spooky2th said:
Between the two ssd's.


Ah....ok. I should get a significant improvement by simply switching to SSD though, correct?

The Intel is only 60GB, so I'm still debating whether or not to just go with it.

Seriously, if I did a clean install of Windows 7, a lot of the crap ASUS has on there would be gone, I'd have a couple browsers, Adobe reader, and maybe a small handful of essential programs like that. I think the 60GB would more than cover that. The 120GB Crucial would just give me way more insurance. It's not an expensive laptop, I'm just worried about the HDD dying from vibration, but I want to use the right SSD too.
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a c 78 G Storage
June 23, 2013 9:42:34 AM

Yup, with either ssd you should see a good improvement in boot time and responsiveness of your comp.
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June 23, 2013 9:52:30 AM

spooky2th said:
Yup, with either ssd you should see a good improvement in boot time and responsiveness of your comp.


What do you think about the 60GB? A few posts back, when I was talking about cloning it, you said I'd probably have less than 20GB left, which sounds about right, as there is about 40GB used now on my laptop.

Obviously it would be even better with a fresh install of Windows.
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a c 78 G Storage
June 23, 2013 11:51:07 AM

60Gb is too small for me. But thats just my opinion. If you think thats all you need for what you use your laptop for, then it is an option for you to think about.
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a c 258 D Laptop
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June 23, 2013 12:09:24 PM

For my use, a 60GB is too small. My current 128 Sandisk has 63.3 used space. Win8 Pro, plus most of the applications. Lightroom, an older version of PS, PaintShop Pro, etc, etc, etc.

I could probably squeeze that onto a 60GB drive, but I'd be sweating the free space all the time.

The price difference between a 60 and a 128 isn't all that much. At Amazon, the Crucial M4 64 is $82, and the 128 is $121.
Choose accordingly.
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June 23, 2013 12:38:16 PM

USAFRet said:
For my use, a 60GB is too small. My current 128 Sandisk has 63.3 used space. Win8 Pro, plus most of the applications. Lightroom, an older version of PS, PaintShop Pro, etc, etc, etc.

I could probably squeeze that onto a 60GB drive, but I'd be sweating the free space all the time.

The price difference between a 60 and a 128 isn't all that much. At Amazon, the Crucial M4 64 is $82, and the 128 is $121.
Choose accordingly.


Well.....I was contemplating the M500 120GB, which is 114.99, and it's the latest generation from Crucial, so between you and spooky2th, I think I'll go with that. I'd rather have the Intel 120GB, but it's $35 more, and though they have a great reputation and warranty, Crucial is a solid company as well.
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June 24, 2013 1:21:45 PM

I ordered the Intel 520 120GB. It's what I have in my desktop.
I ordered the cloning kit, just in case, with the Apricorn software and USB to SATA cable, but I'm still on the fence about that. The guy at ASUS said it will only clone the first partition, and not the hidden recovery partition, but that the old HDD would serve as a backup. He also suggested a fresh install of Windows 7, which still sounds good to me. I'm a little concerned about screwing something up with the drivers and whatnot, but that's just because I don't do this all the time. I built the desktop I'm using, so I guess there is nothing to be afraid of, but it's still not second nature to me.

The guys at ASUS also said that Windows has most of the drivers for the laptop, including touchpad drivers and whatnot, so for the most part, after installing a fresh copy of Windows 7, the laptop will pretty much function normally.
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