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HyperX Beast (T3) - 16GB Kit* (4x4GB) - DDR3 2400MHz CL11 + Asus Z87-A

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June 22, 2013 11:52:49 PM

Is HyperX Beast (T3) - 16GB Kit* (4x4GB) - DDR3 2400MHz CL11 Intel XMP DIMM

Part Number: KHX24C11T3K4/16X

is compatible with asus z87-a motherboard.
June 23, 2013 12:07:04 AM

Any particular reason why you are wanting a 4x4GB kit over a 2x8GB kit? Realistically, 8GB is enough for most needs but if you are in need of 16GB then this Mushkin Enhanced Redline 16GB kit would be better choice.
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a c 788 Ĉ ASUS
a c 1943 } Memory
June 23, 2013 12:11:28 AM

Yes it's compatible, and no you don't have to set them manually, should be able to enable XMP and use profile 1..........but since not mentioned above, you will need a K model CPU...another thing, a suggestion, the GSkill Tridents are about $10 less and have a lower CL (10 vs the HyperX CL11) so you'll see better performance from the Tridents, I've used a ton of these sticks in the last 6-8 months. Even run the 2400 32GB set in my IB rig (shown at right
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June 23, 2013 3:49:22 AM

Tradesman1 said:
Yes it's compatible, and no you don't have to set them manually, should be able to enable XMP and use profile 1..........but since not mentioned above, you will need a K model CPU...another thing, a suggestion, the GSkill Tridents are about $10 less and have a lower CL (10 vs the HyperX CL11) so you'll see better performance from the Tridents, I've used a ton of these sticks in the last 6-8 months. Even run the 2400 32GB set in my IB rig (shown at right


There really isn't any practicality in using 2400 ram on Ivy Bridge and I haven't seen any indication that memory scales better on Haswell.


http://www.anandtech.com/show/6372/memory-performance-1...
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a c 788 Ĉ ASUS
a c 1943 } Memory
June 23, 2013 8:37:33 AM

Yes and those BM are acquired from running a single BM, high freq DRAM shines when multi tasking and using big data sets where the bandwidth comes into play, if you only run one app at a time email, a game then there is still a bit of a gain, but play the game with other windows/apps going or just multiple windows and you'll see less reads/rites to a page file and more straight performance from higher freq sticks
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June 23, 2013 2:07:05 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Yes and those BM are acquired from running a single BM, high freq DRAM shines when multi tasking and using big data sets where the bandwidth comes into play, if you only run one app at a time email, a game then there is still a bit of a gain, but play the game with other windows/apps going or just multiple windows and you'll see less reads/rites to a page file and more straight performance from higher freq sticks


Actually have data to back up this claim?
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a c 788 Ĉ ASUS
a c 1943 } Memory
June 23, 2013 3:44:38 PM

Sure, before I form an answer, how well do you understand DRAM and how it works, not trying to be difficult or anything but have had to explain a number of different ways, because very few really understand DRAM
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June 23, 2013 11:30:02 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Sure, before I form an answer, how well do you understand DRAM and how it works, not trying to be difficult or anything but have had to explain a number of different ways, because very few really understand DRAM


You don't need to explain how DRAM works for me. Data illustrating your claim would be sufficient.
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a c 788 Ĉ ASUS
a c 1943 } Memory
June 23, 2013 11:36:38 PM

Most is common sense and real world experiences, which is why I asked about your understanding don't know if I have to explain starting with basics. BMs are pretty worthless as they are designed to do a single thing and compare one product against another doing that, they don't bring in muti-tasking and real world computer use
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June 23, 2013 11:42:48 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Most is common sense and real world experiences, which is why I asked about your understanding don't know if I have to explain starting with basics. BMs are pretty worthless as they are designed to do a single thing and compare one product against another doing that, they don't bring in muti-tasking and real world computer use


I am not disputing this claim. However, certain upgrades can only be realized in benchmarks and are not easily observed in real world experiences and memory frequency is one of those circumstances. In what real world scenario can you actually differentiate DDR 2133 from DDR 2400? In fact, how do you go about distinguishing real world differences between the same frequency ram with different timing? I would love to know how keen your senses are that you are able to discern the difference between such setups.

In fact, down-clock your ram in your 2400 rig to 2133 and provide me some insight into the observed differences in performance.
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a c 788 Ĉ ASUS
a c 1943 } Memory
June 23, 2013 11:57:37 PM

Real quick and one of my favorites is to take a client let them sit at two identical systems and do like they normally do, open up some browser windows, pop open maybe a CAD or GIS program, run a virus check, check email, basically do what they do in a normal session, then put them on the other rig and let them do the same, not telling them which has say 2133 or which has 2400....if they are on a single system build , very similar, have them sit and do what they do, thhen tell them I want to try it with some tweaks (not telling them I'm changing DRAM) and send them to get coffee or a sandwich or something, they come back and get back into it, the whole spiel, windows open, virus scanner, CAD, images, whatever.....then I'll ask which they like better the one rig or the other, or the system w/ or without tweaks, appr 85% of the time they pick the system with the faster DRAM, and if it's a couple steps different say 1600 vs 2133 or 1866 vs 2400 it's even higher they pick the one with the faster sticks...and blindly, they have no idea what the difference between the two even is.....generally many are amazed it's the DRAM because they have read the same junk as everybody else - and then I'll often pull out some reviews showing that these 'expert' writers don't know what they are talking about...i.e. have seen a few where a writer complains 'the RAM didn't set the proper timings under XMP', well, duh, the sticks don't set the timings, maybe that's why. The sticks have the proper info in their SPD, it's the responsibility of the BIOS (actually the programmers) to pull that info and implement it, which it often doesn't so and why about 50-75% of most BIOS updates are actually RAM fixes/updates....It would help if during their QVL testing the mobo makers would test under XMP, but they don't, they 'test' with whatever they have on hand (you'll often see sets that have been out of production for a couple years, and they test at the mobos default of 1333 or 1600
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a b } Memory
June 24, 2013 12:16:50 AM

Tradesman1 said:
Real quick and one of my favorites is to take a client let them sit at two identical systems and do like they normally do, open up some browser windows, pop open maybe a CAD or GIS program, run a virus check, check email, basically do what they do in a normal session, then put them on the other rig and let them do the same, not telling them which has say 2133 or which has 2400....if they are on a single system build , very similar, have them sit and do what they do, thhen tell them I want to try it with some tweaks (not telling them I'm changing DRAM) and send them to get coffee or a sandwich or something, they come back and get back into it, the whole spiel, windows open, virus scanner, CAD, images, whatever.....then I'll ask which they like better the one rig or the other, or the system w/ or without tweaks, appr 85% of the time they pick the system with the faster DRAM, and if it's a couple steps different say 1600 vs 2133 or 1866 vs 2400 it's even higher they pick the one with the faster sticks...and blindly, they have no idea what the difference between the two even is.....generally many are amazed it's the DRAM because they have read the same junk as everybody else - and then I'll often pull out some reviews showing that these 'expert' writers don't know what they are talking about...i.e. have seen a few where a writer complains 'the RAM didn't set the proper timings under XMP', well, duh, the sticks don't set the timings, maybe that's why. The sticks have the proper info in their SPD, it's the responsibility of the BIOS (actually the programmers) to pull that info and implement it, which it often doesn't so and why about 50-75% of most BIOS updates are actually RAM fixes/updates....It would help if during their QVL testing the mobo makers would test under XMP, but they don't, they 'test' with whatever they have on hand (you'll often see sets that have been out of production for a couple years, and they test at the mobos default of 1333 or 1600


Wham bam thank you maam.
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a c 788 Ĉ ASUS
a c 1943 } Memory
June 24, 2013 8:39:57 AM

Hope it helped, like I mentioned sometimes it's hard to explain, for some they want the more technical, others want thing more basic, it's trying to sort of draw a line on how to explain ;) 
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June 24, 2013 12:13:46 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Hope it helped, like I mentioned sometimes it's hard to explain, for some they want the more technical, others want thing more basic, it's trying to sort of draw a line on how to explain ;) 


Actually, it provided no insight. Your insightful "research" can be explained by the serial position effect or be a simple case of suggestibility.
You have provided no true insight into what your clients perceived to be the difference in performance between the two systems and by suggesting that one system was "tweaked" while the other was not infers superiority to the "tweaked" system.
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a c 788 Ĉ ASUS
a c 1943 } Memory
June 24, 2013 12:59:19 PM

Yeah ...and when the tweaked system is the one with the slower DRAM, and they still pick the system with the faster DRAM? As I said the test are done blind, as much for them as for me, I want to see if people notice (and they obviously do) and is much for me also. They see it's faster, they have more trust in me and my suggestions....and as said, there are no benchmarks that equate to real world usage. Would also add most of the systems are high end and the users experienced, it's not just email/browser user, these folks use their systems to earn/make money
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