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Windows 8 boots into red screen, but functions normally

Last response: in Windows 8
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June 24, 2013 2:50:01 AM

I have a Dell Insprion 3721. It currently has Windows 8 (64bit) installed. My issue is that Windows boots to the start screen, screen is red in areas as if it was a video driver issue. I tested the HDMI out, the screen output is normal color. Attempting to correct the issue, I troubleshooted video driver, DirectX, ect. I did note the redish screen begins when you press power and the DELL logo appears. I begin to suspect the bios, in this case UEFI ver A05. I updated the UEFI to ver A07 which did not work. I did see a youtube video entering UEFI and install default secure boot keys correcting the issue, but the video was for Microsoft Surface. I banged my head over this issue. It all began when using HDMI out to a HDTV output. Any suggestions?
a b * Windows 8
June 24, 2013 3:01:03 AM

If the video port video is fine it not the mb video chipset or driver it a failing LCD screen.
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a b * Windows 8
June 24, 2013 3:34:49 AM

snfullif said:
I have a Dell Insprion 3721. It currently has Windows 8 (64bit) installed. My issue is that Windows boots to the start screen, screen is red in areas as if it was a video driver issue. I tested the HDMI out, the screen output is normal color. Attempting to correct the issue, I troubleshooted video driver, DirectX, ect. I did note the redish screen begins when you press power and the DELL logo appears. I begin to suspect the bios, in this case UEFI ver A05. I updated the UEFI to ver A07 which did not work. I did see a youtube video entering UEFI and install default secure boot keys correcting the issue, but the video was for Microsoft Surface. I banged my head over this issue. It all began when using HDMI out to a HDTV output. Any suggestions?


This isn't a software issue and fiddling with the firmware settings and UEFI keys will only make things worse.

Your LCD screen is powered by an LCD controller. The LCD controller is attached directly to the GPU (in your case, an IGP) through a number of LVDS pairs in a fashion somewhat similar to DVI. The pairs are connected via a ribbon strip that runs from the display to a port on the motherboard (or signal backplane on some laptops that have discrete GPUs). If this connector comes loose or shorts out (a huge problem for differential signalling), the display will misbehave in a fashion just like you are seeing. When the display is run in a low resolution mode such as when first turned on, not all of the pairs are needed and anomalies may not be seen. However, when the display enters a high resolution mode, all of the pairs are needed and failures will become apparent.

90% of the time this can be fixed by removing the LCD panel, cleaning the connector contacts, and firmly reseating the connector. This can be done at home with some care, or at most PC repair shops.
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