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How should I go about building my pc?

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June 24, 2013 1:30:40 PM

Hey everyone. I don't have quite enough money to build my whole computer at first, so I've purchased my mobo, cpu, memory, and psu. I though that this way, I could at least do a test boot to make sure everything was functional and I could make sure nothing would have to go back to newegg. Then, I'll wait and buy the rest of the components in the next couple days. Is this a bad idea? Should I wait and put it all together when I have all the other components? I just don't want to miss out on my 30 day return window. I am suffering from a phobia of screwing up my extremely expensive components, please help!

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June 24, 2013 1:36:18 PM

Yea you can do it that way. But the down side on this one is, by the time you assemble your pc, a lot of new products have come out and might regret and want to get the newer tech. It happened to me. lol
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June 24, 2013 1:38:27 PM

I would get a case before trying to test anything. With your components and a case you could at least boot into BIOS, which would prove the memory, CPU, motherboard and PSU all work. There are mounting points to the motherboard, where it mounts to the case, and one of their purposes is to also ground the motherboard to the case. It's possible (though not likely) that failure to ground the mounting holes on the motherboard could cause problems.

If you do try to boot without a case, make very sure that the motherboard is not laying on anything conductive -- you don't want to short out any parts of the motherboard's printed circuit board by laying it on something conductive (like I did with my second build, when I forgot to put standoffs between the motherboard and the case -- fortunately it did no damage, just would not boot).
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June 24, 2013 1:47:30 PM

mbreslin1954 said:
I would get a case before trying to test anything. With your components and a case you could at least boot into BIOS, which would prove the memory, CPU, motherboard and PSU all work. There are mounting points to the motherboard, where it mounts to the case, and one of their purposes is to also ground the motherboard to the case. It's possible (though not likely) that failure to ground the mounting holes on the motherboard could cause problems.

If you do try to boot without a case, make very sure that the motherboard is not laying on anything conductive -- you don't want to short out any parts of the motherboard's printed circuit board by laying it on something conductive (like I did with my second build, when I forgot to put standoffs between the motherboard and the case -- fortunately it did no damage, just would not boot).


Thanks for the detailed answer. I'll probably just boot things up on top of the mobo's cardboard case. Though shouldn't I be able to access BIOS without a case?
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