Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Time resets after I disconnect power from computer, replaced cmos battery didnt work

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
June 25, 2013 3:52:34 PM

I have an Asus M5A99X EVO R2.0 motherboard. After building my computer and booting it for the first time, that lovely screen comes up where you choose the disk you want to boot from.

Anyways, after installing windows 7 and running the computer successfully, I usually power down my entire setup by turning off the power bars. When I turn back on the power bar and turn the computer on, instead of going to the windows boot screen and login page, I go to the first time boot screen instead.

At first I figured the CMOS battery was dead, although odd since its a new motherboard but why not rule it out. I replaced the CMOS battery and it didn't help.

An Asus rep mentioned to flash the BIOS to the most up to date version. Tried that, no dice.

So with all that being said...is there something else I can try? Or is this motherboard defective?
a b V Motherboard
June 25, 2013 4:36:47 PM

Dumb question here, but is the CMOS reset jumper in the correct position? If it isn't, usually the computer doesn't turn on, but I've seen some boards that will power on anyway, and forget the BIOS settings every time the power is shut off.

Casey
m
0
l
June 25, 2013 5:26:01 PM

cklaubur said:
Dumb question here, but is the CMOS reset jumper in the correct position? If it isn't, usually the computer doesn't turn on, but I've seen some boards that will power on anyway, and forget the BIOS settings every time the power is shut off.

Casey


Interesting question Casey! I opened up the case to look for the actual reset jumper...and it's not even there!!! perhaps that's the reason why it's resetting when unplugged?

So if the motherboard didn't come with the jumper, where would I get one? Radio Shack or Fry's or some other evil computer store?


BAH Update on this...computer tech friend said I don't need a jumper in the default position cause it's the same as if the jumper wasn't there. He did advise me to connect the two other prongs to reset the cmos.

I guess I'll see where that takes me!

I was also advised by an asus rep to try the RAM in each slot one by one to see if the RAM may be bad. And if that doesn't go, it's the mobo.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b V Motherboard
June 25, 2013 8:59:24 PM

Your computer tech friend is correct. If the jumper isn't there, it's not resetting the BIOS.

Sorry I couldn't help out more.

Casey
m
0
l
a c 1721 V Motherboard
June 25, 2013 9:44:34 PM

After changing the CMOS battery, did you reset the date/time in the BIOS, if not boot into BIOS and do so
m
0
l
June 26, 2013 6:52:33 AM

Tradesman1 said:
After changing the CMOS battery, did you reset the date/time in the BIOS, if not boot into BIOS and do so


Will give this a shot.
m
0
l
June 26, 2013 9:21:11 AM

Tradesman1 said:
After changing the CMOS battery, did you reset the date/time in the BIOS, if not boot into BIOS and do so


So I set the date/time in BIOS. Unplugged the computer for less than a minute, started up and the time kept the same.

Unfortunately after leaving the computer unplugged for 5 minutes yielded a reset in the time.

No dice on that solution :( 

ASUS rep says the mobo is defective so back it goes! Thanks for all the troubleshooting everyone!!!
m
0
l
a c 1721 V Motherboard
June 26, 2013 3:38:05 PM

Let us know when you get the replacement
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
June 26, 2013 5:00:59 PM

You are supposed to shutdown the PC using the Start Menu > Shutdown then you are not supposed to turrn off the power bar to the PSU because the bios settings rely on the trickle of power from the power bar so, in event of you switching off the power bar, the settings have to rely on the cmos battery.

When you set the time & date, you have to Save then Exit then after first post you can hold the power button in for a few seconds to force a shutdown. Wat for about ten seconds prior to turning off the mains power.

Whenever there is a change in settings or a power off instance the bios may require a manual Save & Exit even if no changes are done. Most Proprietory PC's have this feature like Dell, HP, Acer, but not necessarily Asus, Gigabyte nor Asrock.

Never turn off from the mains power when the PC is booted up unless you can see smoke bellowing out from it or the smell of burning circuitry is filling up your nostrils.
m
0
l
June 27, 2013 8:28:27 AM

TenPc said:
You are supposed to shutdown the PC using the Start Menu > Shutdown then you are not supposed to turrn off the power bar to the PSU because the bios settings rely on the trickle of power from the power bar so, in event of you switching off the power bar, the settings have to rely on the cmos battery.

When you set the time & date, you have to Save then Exit then after first post you can hold the power button in for a few seconds to force a shutdown. Wat for about ten seconds prior to turning off the mains power.

Whenever there is a change in settings or a power off instance the bios may require a manual Save & Exit even if no changes are done. Most Proprietory PC's have this feature like Dell, HP, Acer, but not necessarily Asus, Gigabyte nor Asrock.

Never turn off from the mains power when the PC is booted up unless you can see smoke bellowing out from it or the smell of burning circuitry is filling up your nostrils.


I shut the PC down using the start menu and when it's off, I will then turn off the power strip.
When I set the date and time, I did exactly what you mentioned (Asus rep said to as well).
m
0
l
June 27, 2013 8:29:26 AM

Tradesman1 said:
Let us know when you get the replacement


Replacement comes today!
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
June 27, 2013 11:07:20 AM

Don't turn off the power bar

Why do yo uturn off the power bar? To save power?
m
0
l
June 27, 2013 11:33:36 AM

TenPc said:
Don't turn off the power bar

Why do yo uturn off the power bar? To save power?


The power bar is connected to other electronics that I usually power down. I can switch to an independent bar and never turn it off, but regardless, the time should still be saved due to the CMOS battery on the motherboard?


m
0
l

Best solution

a b V Motherboard
June 27, 2013 11:56:09 AM

It will be saved but you risk the loss of settings each time the battery runs flat. Just leqve the PC on an independant bar.

Cmos battery usually last as long as five years but not when used daily to provide power for the bios, it would reduce in power, not giving its total voltage as it runs towards the flat end.

I use a power bar that has on/off switches for each plug so I can turn off other appliances that do not require to have constant standby power thus leaving the PC to suport its bios through themains power.

Some motherboards, particularly Acer (well, the ones pre 2005) required more than just the date/time to be set, you had to also set other settings that "proved" the bios was in use. It was difficult at times to find the right combination of events before the date/time became fixed. Usually, though, I just set the standard enabled/disabled options that I thought would be best suited and it usually worked. Some options like "Halt on Keyboard", "Disable Floppy" (if none were present), display option (VGA or onbosard), and Audio, Disabled Lan (never required it).

If other electronicvs are using high voltages or irregular consumptionlike a heater or amplifier (the control of the volume increases/reduces the amount of voltage), or a heater etc, then the power bar would be subjected to differing voltage requirements for each product.

Don't turn off the power to the PSU, and not the rocker switch on the PSU either, so as to allow the mains power to provide the power trickle.
Share
June 27, 2013 12:06:01 PM

TenPc said:
It will be saved but you risk the loss of settings each time the battery runs flat. Just leqve the PC on an independant bar.

Cmos battery usually last as long as five years but not when used daily to provide power for the bios, it would reduce in power, not giving its total voltage as it runs towards the flat end.

I use a power bar that has on/off switches for each plug so I can turn off other appliances that do not require to have constant standby power thus leaving the PC to suport its bios through themains power.

Some motherboards, particularly Acer (well, the ones pre 2005) required more than just the date/time to be set, you had to also set other settings that "proved" the bios was in use. It was difficult at times to find the right combination of events before the date/time became fixed. Usually, though, I just set the standard enabled/disabled options that I thought would be best suited and it usually worked. Some options like "Halt on Keyboard", "Disable Floppy" (if none were present), display option (VGA or onbosard), and Audio, Disabled Lan (never required it).

If other electronicvs are using high voltages or irregular consumptionlike a heater or amplifier (the control of the volume increases/reduces the amount of voltage), or a heater etc, then the power bar would be subjected to differing voltage requirements for each product.

Don't turn off the power to the PSU, and not the rocker switch on the PSU either, so as to allow the mains power to provide the power trickle.


Roger that, I'll keep a separate power bar for the desktop on at all times. Sounds like my CMOS battery was dead from the get go, or it just gets the life sucked out of it within minutes!
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
June 27, 2013 12:17:40 PM

We see the cmos battery displayed in retail stores but how long has it been sitting on the display, waiting for a customer to "adopt" it"?
m
0
l
June 27, 2013 12:25:15 PM

TenPc said:
We see the cmos battery displayed in retail stores but how long has it been sitting on the display, waiting for a customer to "adopt" it"?


that was my first guess that the original cmos battery on the board was dead after sitting there, so i replaced it with a new one, but even that battery didn't hold up.
m
0
l
June 27, 2013 5:25:48 PM

New motherboard in (this one actually came complete with the actual CMOS jumper). Everything works fine. Shutoff from start menu, unplugged. Turned on 5 minutes later and my time has been preserved!

Guess it was a defective motherboard!
m
0
l
a c 1721 V Motherboard
June 27, 2013 5:31:48 PM

Yep, glad all is well, and CMOS batteries should last, plugged or unplugged, that shouldn't make a bit of difference
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
June 28, 2013 1:51:39 PM

The battery does need to be clicked into its holder, with the text info facing upwards.
If the battery shows any signs of corrosion or discolouration then it's not new.

I doubt that the motherboard was faulty, perhaps they sent you the same motherboard (that you sent them) with just a new battery?
m
0
l
!