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How to hook up a 5.1 surround sound to a desktop computer

Hi i have a surround sound with five speakers and one subwoofer and i only have a green jack which is normal for most computers but if you only have the green one then how would you go about hooking it up to a desktop?
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More about hook surround sound desktop computer
  1. Pretty easy!

    Make sure there is a free set of inputs on the back of your stereo. This should be a label that says "Input" and two connectors (usually red and white). Alternateively, they could be labeled "Aux," "Tape" or "CD." This is the source that you will select on the front of your stereo when you wish to listen to sound from your computer.

    Determine the length of cable you need. Measure the distance between the back of your computer to the back of your stereo. The cable generally comes in 3-, 6-, and 12-foot lengths.


    Go to a home electronics store and purchase a Y adapter cable of the proper length. At one end the cable will have a plug to go into the headphone jack of your computer. (The plug will look like the plug on the end of any pair of headphones.) At the other end, the cable will have two RCA-type plugs (red and white). These go into your stereo.

    Plug the computer end of the cable into the headphone jack on your computer. There may be a few jacks; the headphone one is usually green. Connect the other end of the cable to the free set of inputs on the back of your stereo. Be sure to match red to red and white to white.

    Turn on your stereo and set the volume pretty low so you don't accidentally make a REALLY loud noise.

    Select the input to which you connected the Y adapter. For example, if you connected to "Aux," press the "Aux" button on the front of your stereo.

    Adjust the volume of your computer to around 80 percent. You should hear the sound of your computer playing through your stereo.
  2. I assume he wants 5.1 surround. 2 rca plugs(2.0) will only output a stereo siganl and will have to up mix from 2.0 to simulated 5.1 which isn't the best solution

    What speakers do you have and what computer?

    Happy surround, the Prisoner...
  3. thee_prisoner said:
    I assume he wants 5.1 surround. 2 rca plugs(2.0) will only output a stereo siganl and will have to up mix from 2.0 to simulated 5.1 which isn't the best solution

    What speakers do you have and what computer?

    Happy surround, the Prisoner...


    I have a Logitech X-530 system 5.1 and i was wanting to hook it up to a system that has only two connections one green and the second one Baby blue how would i get it to work with a dell optiplex small form factor desktop
  4. Bobby, can you tell me what motherboard you are using? Or do you have analog outputs(lime green you do have)black and orange?

    Lime green puts out a stereo signal(2.0), the light blue is an input so that won't help you. With that computer it isn't going to happen, you don't have enough outputs, unless like I said if you have black and orange also.
  5. what are you using to decode the surround the computer or the receiver? Just so I understand what your attempting?
  6. treman97 said:
    what are you using to decode the surround the computer or the receiver? Just so I understand what your attempting?


    it's a computer.
  7. what application in the computer decodes surround ?
  8. treman97 said:
    what application in the computer decodes surround ?


    it's just realtek sound
  9. The realtek manager does not decode any surround. It manages the output audio channels decoded by such items as cable box, FM dolby receiver, certain video game consoles, ATSC television tuners, windows media center if configured correctly. It can also output two channel virtual surround for stereo simulated surround .
  10. treman97 said:
    The realtek manager does not decode any surround. It manages the output audio channels decoded by such items as cable box, FM dolby receiver, certain video game consoles, ATSC television tuners, windows media center if configured correctly. It can also output two channel virtual surround for stereo simulated surround .


    Your right i just wanted to run it from the back is all it has one stereo output was all.
  11. On a 5.1 stereo receiver there is a multi ch input button on the front (this is the input to use the rear multi channel input). look on the rear of the receiver and you will see 6 rca holes (red and white) near eachother.. one labeled front "R L" one labeled surround "R L" and one labeled center and subwoofer "R L" these will be black holes not red or white I think could depend on receiver.You will need three Y connector wires that looks like a vcr wire but instead of a red and white on the end it is a 3.5 connector like you would use on your cellphone. You plug the 3.5 mm end into the pc rear. The rear of pc is labeled the same way as the audio receiver. there should be a green for the front "R L" a black hole for the surround "R L" and an orange for the sub and center channel speaker. no idea if this is a bad connection but it is 5.1 and spdif doesnt support 5.1 through my receiver and Idon't feel like buying an hdmi receiver. unknwn the quality of this setup but I would assume it is fine considering 5.1 speakers you buy for pc hook up this exact same way.

    chocostain said:
    Pretty easy!

    Make sure there is a free set of inputs on the back of your stereo. This should be a label that says "Input" and two connectors (usually red and white). Alternateively, they could be labeled "Aux," "Tape" or "CD." This is the source that you will select on the front of your stereo when you wish to listen to sound from your computer.

    Determine the length of cable you need. Measure the distance between the back of your computer to the back of your stereo. The cable generally comes in 3-, 6-, and 12-foot lengths.


    Go to a home electronics store and purchase a Y adapter cable of the proper length. At one end the cable will have a plug to go into the headphone jack of your computer. (The plug will look like the plug on the end of any pair of headphones.) At the other end, the cable will have two RCA-type plugs (red and white). These go into your stereo.

    Plug the computer end of the cable into the headphone jack on your computer. There may be a few jacks; the headphone one is usually green. Connect the other end of the cable to the free set of inputs on the back of your stereo. Be sure to match red to red and white to white.

    Turn on your stereo and set the volume pretty low so you don't accidentally make a REALLY loud noise.

    Select the input to which you connected the Y adapter. For example, if you connected to "Aux," press the "Aux" button on the front of your stereo.

    Adjust the volume of your computer to around 80 percent. You should hear the sound of your computer playing through your stereo.


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