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Looking for advice on a Sub-$400 mITX Linux machine for light gaming, CAD

Tags:
  • Silverstone
  • Homebuilt
  • Storage
  • Systems
  • Linux
  • SSD
  • CAD
Last response: in Systems
June 25, 2013 9:07:59 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: July

Budget Range: $300-400 before shipping/ tax/ rebates

System Usage from Most to Least Important: General work/ web, light games (TF2, Indie Bundle Stuff), CAD modeling (no particles or animations)

Are you buying a monitor: No

Do you need to buy OS: Ubuntu

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: any

Location: MN (Micro Center close)

Parts Preferences: Leaning Intel

Overclocking: No

Your Monitor Resolution: 1024x768 (good enough!)

Additional Comments: I'll totally sacrifice size for performance, but small size and an SSD is ideal.

This is a completely new build, and -surprise!-my first time building.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1almJ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1almJ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1almJ/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($119.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H77N-WIFI Mini ITX LGA1155 Motherboard ($99.24 @ Amazon)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($28.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Sandisk 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($49.99 @ Microcenter)
Case: Silverstone SG05BB-LITE Mini ITX Tower Case ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Silverstone 450W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified SFX12V Power Supply ($53.97 @ NCIX US)
Total: $392.16
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-06-25 23:48 EDT-0400)

I appreciate any advice on parts I can add or dial back.

More about : advice 400 mitx linux machine light gaming cad

Best solution

a b B Homebuilt system
a b G Storage
June 25, 2013 9:22:15 PM

No need to sacrifice size mate, here you go:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD A10-5800K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($122.68 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock FM2A75 Pro4 ATX FM2 Motherboard ($85.97 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($32.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Expansys US)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $356.61
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-06-26 00:18 EDT-0400)

No SSD here. Doesn't belong in a budget build and 60GB gets filled too fast.

You also need to keep 20% free for optimal performance. If you really do want one then...

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD A10-5800K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($122.68 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock FM2A75 Pro4 ATX FM2 Motherboard ($85.97 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($32.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 60GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 320GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.68 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $409.29
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-06-26 00:20 EDT-0400)

So to keep under 400, you have to lower the motherboard to Micro. Which isn't preferred:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD A10-5800K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($122.68 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock FM2A75 Pro4-M Micro ATX FM2 Motherboard ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: G.Skill 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($32.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 60GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 320GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.68 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $393.30
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-06-26 00:21 EDT-0400)
Share
June 25, 2013 9:51:39 PM

X79 said:
No need to sacrifice size mate, here you go:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD A10-5800K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($122.68 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock FM2A75 Pro4 ATX FM2 Motherboard ($85.97 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($32.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Expansys US)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $356.61
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-06-26 00:18 EDT-0400)

No SSD here. Doesn't belong in a budget build and 60GB gets filled too fast.

You also need to keep 20% free for optimal performance. If you really do want one then...

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD A10-5800K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($122.68 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock FM2A75 Pro4 ATX FM2 Motherboard ($85.97 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($32.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 60GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 320GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.68 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $409.29
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-06-26 00:20 EDT-0400)

So to keep under 400, you have to lower the motherboard to Micro. Which isn't preferred:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD A10-5800K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($122.68 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock FM2A75 Pro4-M Micro ATX FM2 Motherboard ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: G.Skill 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($32.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 60GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 320GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.68 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $393.30
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-06-26 00:21 EDT-0400)


Awesome, this is probably what I should go with, thanks. I'm still kind of into the i3 for the efficiency and longevity, so here's an i3 build based on the 3rd one. It's more of a preference than a functional choice.

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($119.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: ASRock H77M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($36.55 @ Newegg)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 60GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.98 @ Outlet PC)
Case: Silverstone PS08B (Black) MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $396.47

Any input?

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Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
a b G Storage
June 25, 2013 9:56:59 PM

Well I specifically avoided the i3 due to the poor integrated graphics and thought the

A10 much more powerful in that context. The A10 can play Skyrim at low on 720P or something like that.

Not sure if the i3 can boast quite the same with those Intel HD graphics. You've got more upgradeability/room

with one of the A10 builds. Not that the i3 is bad in any way and if you're happy with those form factors you should

definitely go with it; since as I said, the i3 isn't bad at all.
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June 25, 2013 10:20:24 PM

X79 said:
Well I specifically avoided the i3 due to the poor integrated graphics and thought the

A10 much more powerful in that context. The A10 can play Skyrim at low on 720P or something like that.

Not sure if the i3 can boast quite the same with those Intel HD graphics. You've got more upgradeability/room

with one of the A10 builds. Not that the i3 is bad in any way and if you're happy with those form factors you should

definitely go with it; since as I said, the i3 isn't bad at all.


I wasn't too worried about graphics, but at the same price, quad core is probably better than hyper-threading. Thanks much.
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a b B Homebuilt system
a b G Storage
June 25, 2013 10:25:36 PM

No problem.
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