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New Laptop, Possibly Overheating?

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Last response: in Laptop Tech Support
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June 26, 2013 6:39:42 AM

Just purchased a new laptop, An Acer V3 571g - The specs seemed and are really great for the price. I can't really fault this laptop in any way, I'm pretty much in love with it, even though the specs seem average, it's a real step up from my old laptop.

The problem persists with the temperatures i'm getting from the CPU. It has an i5 3210m - 2.5ghz (Turbo Boost to 3.1ghz) and a Nvidia Gt 630m GPU (Which runs with optimus meaning I can switch usage to the integrated Intel HD 4000 when not running games etc). I believe I get 40-50 degrees idle CPU temps, but on high performance setting, and running a game such as Blacklight Retribution, I can hit up to 85 degrees. Even on the balanced power setting. Prime 95 stress test gave me at max about 79 degrees.

The worst of it all is, I do have a cooling pad (U3 Notepal), a very good one which lets me position the fans anywhere along the bottom to match the vents on the laptop. These temperatures were recorded while the cooling fans were at full blast. I'm just worried, I'm an avid gamer, all I pretty much do on my laptop really. The CPU's TJunction Temp is 105 degrees, whether that is useful to anybody, then great, but as to me it just means if I reach that number, my laptop is well and truly screwed.

To confirm, the CPU does not throttle down, no crashes occur, and to be honest you wouldn't be able to see a problem with it until having recorded the temps like I've done. (Using CoreTemp). There is no dust build up (about a week old), or any other processes running (Clean install of Windows 7 Home professional x64) so I can't think of anything to be at fault for that high temp of 85 degrees except for the CPU/Heatsink itself. Having searched as much as I have, I can't come to a conclusion that the temperature is indeed very bad, or normal for my laptop. Too many mixed reviews, hence why I'm asking here to get my own feedback as I can still get a refund for my laptop (am in no mood to send it in to be checked and then fixed, as that might take a decade). I'd really really appreciate any advice, and I'd like to say thanks on beforehand for taking the time to read this in the first place.
June 26, 2013 6:52:54 AM

it is in the safe operating zone, but it is a little high. What are your ambients like (are you in a desert?, the arctic?)? Personally I would clean and reseat the hs/f with some MX-4 or similar high performance TIM, but that is me (i have done my fair share of hardware repair on laptops)

If you are somewhere with ambients as high as 25-30degC then I would say business as usual. If you are somewhere cold then definitely look to change out the TIM.
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June 26, 2013 7:13:31 AM

Thanks for the reply Brian!
I'm not too sure about the ambient temperature of where I am..but I'd say it's definitely under 20 degrees. (I live in the UK, and it's usually really cold here) also, I do have a fan which I for some reason always have on when I'm in my room, I like being cold :p  So I can't say it's the room temperature.. I assume I'd have to open up my laptop which would void the warranty? Plus I'm not really good with things like that. On top of that, the laptop is like a week old, is it normal for you to suggest that a better TIM be put on to fairly new laptops? I may seem a bit paranoid, but I have to squeeze as much life as I can out of this laptop, so am trying to make sure I do my best to keep it going for a few years. Temps like that were recorded on my old laptop, which was horrible for overheating and is over 2-3 years old. Can't understand why I'm experiencing high temps again, but a completely brand new laptop.
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June 26, 2013 7:46:28 AM

Well, like I say it is within acceptable operating parameters. I just worry that if you ever took it overseas to a hot country it would choke out. It may just be a conservative fan profile setting for the CPU fan. It saves power to not run the fan fast so there is a motivating factor for doing something like this to maintain battery life.

I have a dell laptop that I upgraded and the stock TIM was SO SO BAD. It was chalky, thick and brittle white (I struggle to call it paste). They have every reason to go as cheap as possible with this stuff when the are aiming for a price bracket (generally an i3 is still budget/mainstream).

I would just keep an eye on it. They would refuse a return in all likelihood because it is within range temps that are acceptable. (BTW you CPU will throttle /shut down at 100 deg.

If you are really worried you may be able to undervolt it which I have heard can be done with some programs like notebook hardware control.

I have never had a reason to do it though so take it as an idea, not necessarily a recommendation.
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June 26, 2013 8:00:51 AM

Well, Undervolting seems like an idea..would it be viable to set the maximum CPU usage to 99%? I've read somewhere that doing that disables turbo boost. So it wouldn't run higher than it's unclocked speed of 2.5ghz right? Although, I don't really want to have lower performance, it's not the perfect machine for running games, I'd really not enjoy cutting performance down, and having 2.5ghz instead of 2.5-3.1ghz seems like a major difference. I don't intend on taking it with me, should I go abroad, so no worries there.

Maybe leave it as it is, afterall if anything should come of this, it has a years warranty going for it. If it survives the year without any problems, I'll get it opened up and get a better TIM put on then. Makes sense that they'd be cheap about the TIM. Although in general I'm looking at disabling Turbo Boost, as long as it drops the temp by a fair bit and gives me the performance I want for games.
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June 26, 2013 12:20:16 PM

That all sounds very sensible.
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June 26, 2013 2:07:51 PM

Yes, setting the max CPU performance to 99% does disable turbo boost.

While 84C is a bit warm, it is not unusual for a 15.6" laptop. In the following review of the same Acer Aspire V3-571G, the CPU temp git 84C.

http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Acer-Aspire-V3-571G...

Quote:
The hardware temperatures are also in a good and absolutely harmless range. In our one hour "stress test" (Prime 95 and Furmark) for the purpose of loading the CPU and GPU to 99%, we measured the CPU at an average of 84° C (183° F) and the graphics card at 68° C (154° F).
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June 26, 2013 2:51:16 PM

Thanks very much both of you, helped me settle down and enjoy using my laptop instead of worrying about it! As an update, I disabled turbo boost by the 99% maximum cpu setting, and playing the same game, at the same graphics (seems like no performance loss) I've been able to cut down the max cpu temp to in the 70s, and that's brilliant. Thanks again!
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January 18, 2014 2:47:14 PM

Sorry to bring up this thread again, but I seem to be having the same problem. I also have an Acer Aspire v3-571G with Intel i5-3210M processor and a Nvidia Geforce graphics card. When playing a game though, the laptop gets VERY hot, around the 100 degrees mark. I'm using a program called Speccy and that says my CPU and graphics average at around 95 degrees whilst playing a game. I usually use the fairly low settings (below medium) as it lags pretty bad otherwise even though most games suggest using above medium graphics quality. Using the Turbo Boost Monitor from Intel, when the temperature gets above about 80 degrees, I don't get the benefits of Turbo Boost and it seems to be limited to 2.5Ghz without reaching the 3.1Ghz with turbo boost. I have had this laptop for around a year now and it has been through a few rough times (firstly spilled a curry on the keyboard which I then had to replace, then not learning from my mistakes I spilled some gravy which made the laptop turn off instantly. I took it to a PC shop and they managed to repair it to working order again. Not sure if these actually cause the over heating, as I think its always been this way).
Any ideas for how I can fix this?

Thanks in advance..
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May 24, 2014 1:47:58 PM

ScottWoolven said:
Sorry to bring up this thread again, but I seem to be having the same problem. I also have an Acer Aspire v3-571G with Intel i5-3210M processor and a Nvidia Geforce graphics card. When playing a game though, the laptop gets VERY hot, around the 100 degrees mark. I'm using a program called Speccy and that says my CPU and graphics average at around 95 degrees whilst playing a game. I usually use the fairly low settings (below medium) as it lags pretty bad otherwise even though most games suggest using above medium graphics quality. Using the Turbo Boost Monitor from Intel, when the temperature gets above about 80 degrees, I don't get the benefits of Turbo Boost and it seems to be limited to 2.5Ghz without reaching the 3.1Ghz with turbo boost. I have had this laptop for around a year now and it has been through a few rough times (firstly spilled a curry on the keyboard which I then had to replace, then not learning from my mistakes I spilled some gravy which made the laptop turn off instantly. I took it to a PC shop and they managed to repair it to working order again. Not sure if these actually cause the over heating, as I think its always been this way).
Any ideas for how I can fix this?

Thanks in advance..



Hi, i have the Acer v3 571G with i5 3210m and nvidia 630m that was throttling all the time.. Anyway, i managed to fix the overheating issue by flashing an undervolted bios..now, instead of cloking at 1.09v when gaming..which in turn used to reach 93 degrees, i had someone mod the acer v3 571g bios and set it at 0.8870v..Now my temps never cross 76 degrees on 797Mhz..with any game

head over to the thread below and start on page 4 where my name (Aeonia) is..there are some download links there too..best of luck

http://forum.notebookreview.com/acer/729899-acer-5750g-...
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