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Water Cooling Pump(s) selection

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July 1, 2013 8:31:11 PM

Hello everyone,
As you can probably see, I am new to these forums in the posting manner. I do visit frequently to see whats happening.

Anywho, I have been building/modding custom rigs for a great deal now, and was pondering something. I have this new build for a client and he wanted me to build a big rig for him(900d). Of course it was going to be under water as are the large amount of my builds. His water components would consist of:

1. 2 x EK CoolStream 480 XT (all rads push pull corsair sp120's)
2. ek coolstream 240 xt
3. alphacool vpp655 pump(undecided on the res)
4. primochill 1/2in ridgid tubing
5. 2 x Swiftech Komodo 7970 full cover water blocks
6. XSPC Raystorm

My question was, Would this all be fine on one vpp655? Of course the D5 pumps have great flow but the komodo's are quite restrictive, plus the big radiator space. I suggested a MCP35x or even maybe the MCP35x2 if he wants to go crazy.

What do you guys/gals think?
July 1, 2013 11:06:34 PM

If you have the cards in parallel you could get away with a single pump I think, but your rights that this is about the point where you would want to consider dual pumps.
Having the rads in parallel if possible would also help.
July 2, 2013 6:48:01 AM

manofchalk said:
If you have the cards in parallel you could get away with a single pump I think, but your rights that this is about the point where you would want to consider dual pumps.
Having the rads in parallel if possible would also help.


Yup. I was thinking of going in this order: Res > Pump(s) > bottom(480) rad > GPU > GPU > Top(480) rad > CPU > Bottom(120) rad > Res.

Of course the order in which the components are placed in the loop wont affect the temps to a noticeable amount(As long there is a good flow rate). But it could cause some restriction. If dual pumps would be required, what would you suggest? MCP35x2 or should I just get another vpp655 and a dual pump top?
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July 2, 2013 6:56:27 AM

By cards in parallel, I mean like this.



So in a flow diagram it would be represented as.

.............. GPU ->..............
Loop -<...............>- Loop
...............GPU ->..............

Which will reduce flow restriction by a fair amount.

If you do go for dual pumps, I would just go for the simplest option and just get two D5's rather than two pumps bolted together in a single unit. This way if a pump ever fails its easier and less hassle to replace, and gives you better flexibility later on.
Also I tend to avoid DDC pumps, they heat issues on the back of their PCB's. Unlike D5 pumps, they arent cooled by the water that flows through them.
July 2, 2013 7:55:17 AM

manofchalk said:
By cards in parallel, I mean like this.



So in a flow diagram it would be represented as.

.............. GPU ->..............
Loop -<...............>- Loop
...............GPU ->..............

Which will reduce flow restriction by a fair amount.

If you do go for dual pumps, I would just go for the simplest option and just get two D5's rather than two pumps bolted together in a single unit. This way if a pump ever fails its easier and less hassle to replace, and gives you better flexibility later on.
Also I tend to avoid DDC pumps, they heat issues on the back of their PCB's. Unlike D5 pumps, they arent cooled by the water that flows through them.


Oh yes I knew what you meant, when you said parallel. I think I just read your post wrong. I never really liked the DDC pumps either cause of the heat and noise, but they are quite powerful. D5's have always been reliable for me. Not sure how it really works, but how does the fluid not just pass the first GPU when in Parallel? Whats keeping the fluid moving through both GPU and not just the bottom GPU? I guess this is why I have always ran my cards in series.

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July 2, 2013 8:02:55 AM
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If you ever did Physics in High School, you probably learnt about how electricity moves in a circuit.
Same thing applies here, current (flow) will split equally through parallel portions of a circuit provided both paths offer an equal resistance. If one GPU block were to offer no resistance to flow, then yes all the water would go through that block and not the other.

Electricity and water take the path of least resistance, in this case your offering it two paths of equal resistance. Is it easier to try and force all the water through the one path, or take both.
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