Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

AMD 8350 Maximum "safe" Temp

Tags:
Last response: in CPUs
Share
July 3, 2013 3:48:50 PM

Okay guys, this question is a little different than the other 200 'is my temp okay?' questions I've seen posted. Unlike most folks, I am actually looking to make the most heat possible from my CPU/GPUs. So my question is, what is the highest sustainable temperature I can run this AMD FX 8350 indefinitely without melting it down. Please don't suggest anything under 67C at the cores, I've already had it there for more than 24 hours and it never skipped a beat.

AMD has no official max temp listed: Specs


Know that I am running full liquid cooling across all things that go 'ping!' with a 10 gallon thermal reservoir and dual liquid/air radiators plumbed in parallel with 3 Noctua NF-F12 PWM running a Push/Push/Pull config. I have very a stable thermal platform that doesn't get jittery, even at high temps.

Who has run their rig the hottest?
a b à CPUs
July 3, 2013 3:58:41 PM

Lawrence Orsini said:
Okay guys, this question is a little different than the other 200 'is my temp okay?' questions I've seen posted. Unlike most folks, I am actually looking to make the most heat possible from my CPU/GPUs. So my question is, what is the highest sustainable temperature I can run this AMD FX 8350 indefinitely without melting it down. Please don't suggest anything under 67C at the cores, I've already had it there for more than 24 hours and it never skipped a beat.

Know that I am running full liquid cooling across all things that go 'ping!' with a 10 gallon thermal reservoir and dual liquid/air radiators plumbed in parallel with 3 Noctua NF-F12 PWM running a Push/Push/Pull config. I have very a stable thermal platform that doesn't get jittery, even at high temps.

Who has run their rig the hottest?


I believe it starts to throttle after 70 degrees.
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 182 à CPUs
a b À AMD
July 3, 2013 4:02:48 PM

Lawrence Orsini said:
Please don't suggest anything under 67C at the cores, I've already had it there for more than 24 hours and it never skipped a beat.


assuming your cpu is reporting it's temps right, you're already 7C-12C over the max "safe" temps for the FX cpu. Generally speaking they are no longer stable or for that matter all that safe over 60C... in reality you probably shouldn't get up much higher then 55C...

That said i doubt your cpu is reporting it's temps accurately. since the PhII, AMD has shifted away from using an actual thermometer on it's chips, instead they use some weird algorithm to calculate the closest accurate temperature. The result is many AMD chips are as much as 5-20C off on their reported temps (plus or minus)... generally it isn't much more then 5 to 10, but 20 isn't all that unheard of either.

Not saying you're not running at 67C... just saying you don't have much more to go as if that's accurate (i think AMD throttles their fx chips at 70C; not that anyone ever really sees this... just like the PhII would throttle at 90C... but anyone who's had one will tell you, there isn't a PhII that will run over 65C... so AMDs thermal throttling is silly), you're really risking your chip... and if it's inaccurate you'll be nearing the thermal ceiling very shortly.
Share
Related resources
July 3, 2013 4:17:25 PM

ingtar33 said:
Lawrence Orsini said:
Please don't suggest anything under 67C at the cores, I've already had it there for more than 24 hours and it never skipped a beat.


assuming your cpu is reporting it's temps right, you're already 7C-12C over the max "safe" temps for the FX cpu. Generally speaking they are no longer stable or for that matter all that safe over 60C... in reality you probably shouldn't get up much higher then 55C...

That said i doubt your cpu is reporting it's temps accurately. since the PhII, AMD has shifted away from using an actual thermometer on it's chips, instead they use some weird algorithm to calculate the closest accurate temperature. The result is many AMD chips are as much as 5-20C off on their reported temps (plus or minus)... generally it isn't much more then 5 to 10, but 20 isn't all that unheard of either.

Not saying you're not running at 67C... just saying you don't have much more to go as if that's accurate (i think AMD throttles their fx chips at 70C; not that anyone ever really sees this... just like the PhII would throttle at 90C... but anyone who's had one will tell you, there isn't a PhII that will run over 65C... so AMDs thermal throttling is silly), you're really risking your chip... and if it's inaccurate you'll be nearing the thermal ceiling very shortly.


Thanks, that's helpful, I do have a couple more questions though. first, what's the best way to get true temps off the chip if not the core monitor? Second, how high can I take the temp if the CPU is idle or very lightly loaded... I'm assuming it would run at a higher temperature if it weren't actually loaded. And lastly, what physically happens to the chip when it eventually fails on temp?

Thanks for the help.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 3, 2013 10:42:31 PM

4 and 6 cores have a limit of 71C. 8 cores have a maximum of 61C. So, try for something lower than 61C. And if you want a program that will heat up your CPU I suggest Prime95.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
July 3, 2013 10:56:04 PM

Lawrence Orsini said:

Know that I am running full liquid cooling across all things that go 'ping!' with a 10 gallon thermal reservoir and dual liquid/air radiators plumbed in parallel with 3 Noctua NF-F12 PWM running a Push/Push/Pull config. I have very a stable thermal platform that doesn't get jittery, even at high temps.


Wut O.o
m
0
l
a c 182 à CPUs
a b À AMD
July 3, 2013 11:15:28 PM

Lawrence Orsini said:
ingtar33 said:
Lawrence Orsini said:
Please don't suggest anything under 67C at the cores, I've already had it there for more than 24 hours and it never skipped a beat.


assuming your cpu is reporting it's temps right, you're already 7C-12C over the max "safe" temps for the FX cpu. Generally speaking they are no longer stable or for that matter all that safe over 60C... in reality you probably shouldn't get up much higher then 55C...

That said i doubt your cpu is reporting it's temps accurately. since the PhII, AMD has shifted away from using an actual thermometer on it's chips, instead they use some weird algorithm to calculate the closest accurate temperature. The result is many AMD chips are as much as 5-20C off on their reported temps (plus or minus)... generally it isn't much more then 5 to 10, but 20 isn't all that unheard of either.

Not saying you're not running at 67C... just saying you don't have much more to go as if that's accurate (i think AMD throttles their fx chips at 70C; not that anyone ever really sees this... just like the PhII would throttle at 90C... but anyone who's had one will tell you, there isn't a PhII that will run over 65C... so AMDs thermal throttling is silly), you're really risking your chip... and if it's inaccurate you'll be nearing the thermal ceiling very shortly.


Thanks, that's helpful, I do have a couple more questions though. first, what's the best way to get true temps off the chip if not the core monitor? Second, how high can I take the temp if the CPU is idle or very lightly loaded... I'm assuming it would run at a higher temperature if it weren't actually loaded. And lastly, what physically happens to the chip when it eventually fails on temp?

Thanks for the help.


ok... when a chip gets too hot and fails typically you'll either blue screen or your system will just reset on the spot. It blue screens when the chip is unstable due to temps (it happens) and errors, it black screen resets when it just straight fails from too much heat; if you pass the MB's safe temps for your chip the mb will beep when it turns itself off.

Generally speaking we're talking about 2 types of failures.
1) instability caused by excessive heat
2) overheat causing motherboard to turn off system OR damage which kills chip.

Generally MBs are good enough to keep your chip from melting. There are two types of wear your chip suffers from overclocking.
1) gradual warping of the chip itself and the and degrading of transistors due to continual excessive heat, eventually leading to chip death.
2) gradual degradation of CPU due to excessive voltage.

Both of these can give the same symptoms... such as gradually needing more voltage to achieve a stable overclock
similar to one you had when the chip was new. ie... if i needed 1.4385 vcore to overclock my PhII to 3.8ghz when i got the chip new... and 6mo later i need 1.4625 vcore to stabilize the exact same overclock, that's a chip which is breaking down due to excessive voltage/heat). Once this starts to happen your chip is on it's last legs.
m
0
l
July 8, 2013 4:35:53 PM

chromic said:
Lawrence Orsini said:

Know that I am running full liquid cooling across all things that go 'ping!' with a 10 gallon thermal reservoir and dual liquid/air radiators plumbed in parallel with 3 Noctua NF-F12 PWM running a Push/Push/Pull config. I have very a stable thermal platform that doesn't get jittery, even at high temps.


Wut O.o


Things that go ping is a Monty Python reference for the most expensive of whatever.

The radiators are sandwiched between 3 Noctua fans with airflow all pointed the same direction and the 10 gallon thermal reservoir is a liquid/liquid heat exchanger that stores the heat from the computer so I can do other things with it... instead of dumping it into the room.

Makes sense?
m
0
l
July 8, 2013 5:10:50 PM

ingtar33 said:
Lawrence Orsini said:
ingtar33 said:
Lawrence Orsini said:
Please don't suggest anything under 67C at the cores, I've already had it there for more than 24 hours and it never skipped a beat.


assuming your cpu is reporting it's temps right, you're already 7C-12C over the max "safe" temps for the FX cpu. Generally speaking they are no longer stable or for that matter all that safe over 60C... in reality you probably shouldn't get up much higher then 55C...

That said i doubt your cpu is reporting it's temps accurately. since the PhII, AMD has shifted away from using an actual thermometer on it's chips, instead they use some weird algorithm to calculate the closest accurate temperature. The result is many AMD chips are as much as 5-20C off on their reported temps (plus or minus)... generally it isn't much more then 5 to 10, but 20 isn't all that unheard of either.

Not saying you're not running at 67C... just saying you don't have much more to go as if that's accurate (i think AMD throttles their fx chips at 70C; not that anyone ever really sees this... just like the PhII would throttle at 90C... but anyone who's had one will tell you, there isn't a PhII that will run over 65C... so AMDs thermal throttling is silly), you're really risking your chip... and if it's inaccurate you'll be nearing the thermal ceiling very shortly.


Thanks, that's helpful, I do have a couple more questions though. first, what's the best way to get true temps off the chip if not the core monitor? Second, how high can I take the temp if the CPU is idle or very lightly loaded... I'm assuming it would run at a higher temperature if it weren't actually loaded. And lastly, what physically happens to the chip when it eventually fails on temp?

Thanks for the help.


ok... when a chip gets too hot and fails typically you'll either blue screen or your system will just reset on the spot. It blue screens when the chip is unstable due to temps (it happens) and errors, it black screen resets when it just straight fails from too much heat; if you pass the MB's safe temps for your chip the mb will beep when it turns itself off.

Generally speaking we're talking about 2 types of failures.
1) instability caused by excessive heat
2) overheat causing motherboard to turn off system OR damage which kills chip.

Generally MBs are good enough to keep your chip from melting. There are two types of wear your chip suffers from overclocking.
1) gradual warping of the chip itself and the and degrading of transistors due to continual excessive heat, eventually leading to chip death.
2) gradual degradation of CPU due to excessive voltage.

Both of these can give the same symptoms... such as gradually needing more voltage to achieve a stable overclock
similar to one you had when the chip was new. ie... if i needed 1.4385 vcore to overclock my PhII to 3.8ghz when i got the chip new... and 6mo later i need 1.4625 vcore to stabilize the exact same overclock, that's a chip which is breaking down due to excessive voltage/heat). Once this starts to happen your chip is on it's last legs.


Thanks, that was really helpful. Do you know what temps a chip will live to when it is idle - I'm assuming it has a much higher threshold if it isn't creating its own heat. I know I'm likely pushing some boundried here but... thats what they are for!
m
0
l
a c 182 à CPUs
a b À AMD
July 8, 2013 11:48:01 PM

Lawrence Orsini said:
Thanks, that was really helpful. Do you know what temps a chip will live to when it is idle - I'm assuming it has a much higher threshold if it isn't creating its own heat. I know I'm likely pushing some boundried here but... thats what they are for!


well, my cpu generally runs around 5-10C hotter then ambient temps when idle... that seems to be pretty much standard. though that will start to get warmer the more vcore being pumped into your cpu. for example... this cpu will idle at (ambient temps at 28C) 33C at stock 1.4V, but at 1.45V it will idle much closer to 35C-37C depending, and at 1.5V it idles at about 40C... (of course this is a PhII, and even if i had your FX cpu, i would point out my cooling solution and chip are not your cooling solution and chip, and therefor this is not much to go on)
m
0
l
May 17, 2014 6:25:53 PM

So it turns out, after almost a year of testing and tweaking, that the AMD 8350 Black is actually quite stable and happy up to about 79c as long as you underclock. You can see in this pic I'm running the loop temp at 71c at 3.4 on the clock and have the fans configured to maintain the temps at that level while the CPU/GPUs grind away mining coins... which turns out to be a pretty stable load without some of the bumps that prime 95 seemed to have when it was running. There is no damage to the cpu, if I drive the loop temp down to 21c I can still get a stable 4.8 out of the 8350.

I've checked the loop temp with a Fluke and it is running at the 70c in the pic, you can see when I stop the CPU miner the CPU temp drops right to loop and sticks so thats a pretty good indication that the algorithm AMD is using to calculate temp must be pretty close.

Thanks for the advice, all.

" alt="" class="imgLz frmImg " />
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
June 12, 2014 1:00:57 AM

interesting
m
0
l
June 25, 2014 12:32:48 PM

Many thanks for this answer, very useful.
m
0
l
July 31, 2014 7:42:00 AM

According to AMD, 70*C is the maximum.
m
0
l
!