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BSOD on computer maybe because of gpu?

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July 3, 2013 4:25:57 PM

A few days ago I tested a gpu that had a code 43 on another computer. Before that, the computer had been running fine and had not shown any symptoms of anything bad, no crashes no nothing. But after I removed the gpu and uninstalled the drivers, the computer started to crash and get the BSOD often, about 5 minutes after boot. Is it because of the gpu or could it be something else?

More about : bsod computer gpu

July 3, 2013 4:54:02 PM

No idea what a code 43 is. Simple Google with exact video card model and Code 43 would help identify what that is (since you don't even say what video card it is).

Secondly to that, What is the BSOD? WHat is the file listed or error code. Again simple google can help narrow that you see on the screen.

According to your statement you removed the GPu and your having crashes in the Computer with it PHYSICALLY not in it, so how can the GPU still be the issue? Not make any sense.

So which end of the problem are going to address your PC with some other video card, or the video card failin in any PC it is plugged into?

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July 3, 2013 5:13:39 PM

With any pc that acting up run down a list. scan for virus and malware then check for dust clogging fans or a slow fan. Check that your ram is seated and run memtest from a boot disk overnight. Use hardware monitor check your temps and power supply voltage. Check the mb and power supply for swollen or leaky caps.
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July 3, 2013 6:07:24 PM

Code 43 said something about Windows stopping the gpu (GeForce GTX 660) because of an error with it. And I don't know about this: "According to your statement you removed the GPu and your having crashes in the Computer with it PHYSICALLY not in it, so how can the GPU still be the issue? Not make any sense." All I know is that it started after I did the test. As to the BSOD, I'll try to see what the error code is soon
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July 6, 2013 12:12:29 PM

OKAY, so lets take a step back.
That image is when the GPU is NOT installed in the computer correct?
Second, what happens if you select going into SAFE mode? Does it still BSOD?
If this occurs when the GPU is not installed AND in SAFE mode, your Windows may be corrupt or as indicated bad memory sticks. If even in SAFE mode this happens, I would look at booting off the WIndows DVD (We are guessing this is Windows 7???) and use the REPAIR feature to see if you can normally boot. If during the DVD you again BSOD (nothing to do with the harddrive copy of Windows) then it looks like either CPU / Memory could be at issue and would suggest a memory testing software / check in BIOS on what it shows.

Remember if you just 'reached in and remove' the GPU you could have caused electostaticshock, and easily fry components inside without knowing it.
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July 6, 2013 12:58:08 PM

Tom Tancredi said:
OKAY, so lets take a step back.
That image is when the GPU is NOT installed in the computer correct?
Second, what happens if you select going into SAFE mode? Does it still BSOD?
If this occurs when the GPU is not installed AND in SAFE mode, your Windows may be corrupt or as indicated bad memory sticks. If even in SAFE mode this happens, I would look at booting off the WIndows DVD (We are guessing this is Windows 7???) and use the REPAIR feature to see if you can normally boot. If during the DVD you again BSOD (nothing to do with the harddrive copy of Windows) then it looks like either CPU / Memory could be at issue and would suggest a memory testing software / check in BIOS on what it shows.

Remember if you just 'reached in and remove' the GPU you could have caused electostaticshock, and easily fry components inside without knowing it.


This is when the GPU is not inside and it didn't even get to Windows XP (not 7). I tried safe mode and got a bunch of codes and numbers across the screen and it stayed like that for about 5 minutes before it restarted itself and took me to the "start windows" screen where the safemode option wasn't there, only "normally" and "launch startup repair". I chose repair but I just got numbers and then it restarted itself. Only thing that works is normally, but after about 5 minutes it restarts itself again
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July 6, 2013 3:41:43 PM

OKay sounds like XP is hosed. Problem is XP hasn't been supported in a while, so getting drivers and other things for it (patches, security fixes, etc.) is now not a option (no longer offered).

You could try a wipe on the HardDrive (lose everything) and take a shot with reinstalling XP clean. Personally at this point I would rather suggest (unless this CPU/Mem/Mobo are only 24 months old - doubt it) that you would best be served with getting a Walmart off the shelf desktop $300 i3 Core, or better yet an i5, swap out the PowerSupply for something powerful enough to support the new system PLUS your 660.

If your really not sure the 660 works at all, test in another system (buddy with Nvidia), if it doesn't then your looking at everything needing to be replaced.
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