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July 4, 2013 10:07:46 PM

Hello.
I have a really quick question, hopefully.
Please let me start with my build.

cpu. i7 3770k
mobo: asrock extreme 6 z77
cpu cooler: evo 212
case: thermotake mk-1
ram: not purchased yet
psu: not purchased yet
optic: lg blu ray player only+dvd rw etc...
optic: samsung basic dvd rw etc...

My question is as follows. I mainly play with programs like, coral graphics suite, blender 3d, light video editing and such.
Gaming is quite secondary, in fact, I seldom play games on this unit.
Do I really need a high end graphic's card?

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July 4, 2013 10:10:22 PM

If you dont feel that spending $400 on a high end card is justified, then dont spend $400. Something like a GTX 760 will get you very respectable performance at 1080p.
If you dont intend to game at all, you could just use the CPU's integrated graphics.
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July 4, 2013 10:16:51 PM

manofchalk said:
If you dont feel that spending $400 on a high end card is justified, then dont spend $400. Something like a GTX 760 will get you very respectable performance at 1080p.
If you dont intend to game at all, you could just use the CPU's integrated graphics.


Thank you very much, this is my first build (at 47 years old). I just noticed that all the video cards are geared for gaming. Would I get any benefit for graphic design and 3d rendering by using a higher end card or would a modest 1 gig card work just fine
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July 4, 2013 10:26:13 PM

The mainstream graphics card series (GeForce and Radeon) are pretty much just for gaming, though AMD and Nvidia do support professional usage in some form or another (Nvidia has CUDA, AMD is pretty heavily into OpenCL).

Higher end cards do have better compute capabilities, with Nvidia its the presence of more CUDA cores, with AMD its just outright stronger GPU's for OpenCL calculations. To what degree you will just have to read up on reviews.

They do however offer other series of cards that are geared entirely toward professional applications. Nvidia has its Tesla and Quadro series, AMD has its Firepro range.
I'm not too clued into workstation graphics cards, so which one is best for you I don't know. However if you felt uncomfortable spending $400 on a graphics card, then the prices of a workstation card is going to make you cringe.
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July 4, 2013 10:36:45 PM

manofchalk said:
The mainstream graphics card series (GeForce and Radeon) are pretty much just for gaming, though AMD and Nvidia do support professional usage in some form or another (Nvidia has CUDA, AMD is pretty heavily into OpenCL).

Higher end cards do have better compute capabilities, with Nvidia its the presence of more CUDA cores, with AMD its just outright stronger GPU's for OpenCL calculations. To what degree you will just have to read up on reviews.

They do however offer other series of cards that are geared entirely toward professional applications. Nvidia has its Tesla and Quadro series, AMD has its Firepro range.
I'm not too clued into workstation graphics cards, so which one is best for you I don't know. However if you felt uncomfortable spending $400 on a graphics card, then the prices of a workstation card is going to make you cringe.


Well, Just recovered from laughing about the case of the cringes. I'm not even gonna look. I'll just pick up a little ol' 7870 sapphire and let it rip.
I'm in a little deep on this build right now (this was just going to be little hobby deal) and this card should allow for a little gaming, what the heck!
Thank you very much for your time sir,
gferrin
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July 4, 2013 10:38:37 PM

even a 7770 would do what your doing just fine for 99 bucks on the egg. why spend more?
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July 4, 2013 10:43:20 PM

The amount of vram is secondary, gpu performance is first and foremost. About the only thing a gpu would help is 3d modeling, cycles gpu renderer, and depending on the video editing software, it would help the preview window. There could be other uses but that is for the software you listed. 2d will be fine with integrated. Seeing as this is just a hobby, go with a gaming gpu, it will be better performance per dollar.
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July 4, 2013 10:46:43 PM

You might want to look into what your applications can leverage, not much point getting an AMD card if it can only leverage CUDA.
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July 4, 2013 10:49:22 PM

k1114 said:
The amount of vram is secondary, gpu performance is first and foremost. About the only thing a gpu would help is 3d modeling, cycles gpu renderer, and depending on the video editing software, it would help the preview window. There could be other uses but that is for the software you listed. 2d will be fine with integrated. Seeing as this is just a hobby, go with a gaming gpu, it will be better performance per dollar.


Again thank you folks for replying. A 670 is a little pricey, although seems very good, a 7770 would be fine as well.. I just don't know. What would you suggest for a beginner at this stuff, around the 100 to 200 dollar range (if any)
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July 4, 2013 11:02:00 PM

its your choice who you choose but if you have a high demand you should research it on google and see if amd NVidia will serve you best.
Most people here will steer you towards a higher end NVidia card because its game geared but do some research for yourself before you plunt down some funds now people at toms can flame me because this is a forum for more intel and NVidia parts then amd or radeon.
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July 5, 2013 12:09:02 AM

The corel software with gpu accleration as well as blender cycles can use both opencl or cuda. The blender viewport is opengl so I would suggest nvidia but it won't make much difference. You don't seem like you would do anything too demanding so would probably fine with a 7770. But I don't think you need to go higher than a 650ti boost or 7850. If it makes any difference, both companies have free game bundles, nvidia has the free 2 play bundle and amd has the never settle bundle.
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