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Data conversion concept

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Last response: in Applications
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July 7, 2013 5:21:09 PM

I have been toying around with converting raw data to an analog signal and Im curious how this process works. I dont have a very definite problem or question i am just trying to find someone with information on raw data and how it works. what are some useful things to know reguarding the use of raw data in different applications? I guess this is a fairly undefined question but im trying to find where to look for answers on how data is used in various ways
July 7, 2013 8:07:47 PM

Yeah your using very generalized terms.. First your asking about data (that would be digital signal) to analog signals then using terms like 'raw data' which is a totally different thing depending on the applications, use, type of data and so on.

Now if you want to understand what a analog signal is, think a wave curve above then below a median line, this amplitude drops and lifts and is 'grey' as you can (say AM radio) tune it in enough to make sense of the signal without getting ALL of the signal. Digital is all based on 1 or 0, on or off, two states of being, no other way. Digitial signals think of half a square above then have a square below a median line, the above being ON, the below being OFF. Either a full signal status is provided or the data is considered 'garbage' and with later layers in the communications require restransmission..

Raw Data is a totally different matter. If I collect all the Data of everyones credit card, names, addresses, SSNs, etc... this is Raw, because I have no use of it (didn't say using it to develop a score, to create a SPAM list, etc.). Raw being a collection of things unused or unpurposed. Data being information that can be utilized for a goal (create 3D image.. write the next episode of the Simpson... whatever).
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July 8, 2013 5:40:56 PM

Tom Tancredi said:
Yeah your using very generalized terms.. First your asking about data (that would be digital signal) to analog signals then using terms like 'raw data' which is a totally different thing depending on the applications, use, type of data and so on.

Now if you want to understand what a analog signal is, think a wave curve above then below a median line, this amplitude drops and lifts and is 'grey' as you can (say AM radio) tune it in enough to make sense of the signal without getting ALL of the signal. Digital is all based on 1 or 0, on or off, two states of being, no other way. Digitial signals think of half a square above then have a square below a median line, the above being ON, the below being OFF. Either a full signal status is provided or the data is considered 'garbage' and with later layers in the communications require restransmission..

Raw Data is a totally different matter. If I collect all the Data of everyones credit card, names, addresses, SSNs, etc... this is Raw, because I have no use of it (didn't say using it to develop a score, to create a SPAM list, etc.). Raw being a collection of things unused or unpurposed. Data being information that can be utilized for a goal (create 3D image.. write the next episode of the Simpson... whatever).


I read about a guy taking the written data of an application, binary data and exporting it to an 8 bit channel somehow. This is what doesn't make sense, you can translate binary code to sound and produce different tones. Theres something im probably missing involving the principles of data and sound itself. if that makes any sense..
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July 8, 2013 6:18:03 PM

Okay you would have to be specific (article, forum post, something) to get more of a solid answer. Now let me point out a few things, no one does "8-bit" that is what was done more then 20 years ago, coding in 8-Bits (1Byte), as compared to our GigaByte working in 64-Bit (8Byte) code world.

Now back when, say 1980s (ancient for you kids) we didn't have Internet, cellphone, youtube, not even webpages. But when the first games ever released (Pong, Breakout, Asteroids, etc.) they were 8-bit coded games. In the coding was a mechinism or series of waves, sent from the coding to the Audio Device (think of the tinny speaker in your deaktop that BEEPS). That was simple positive and minus lines to the speaker, and could 'modulate' the frequency high, low, repeatedly, or just on and off. Based on this the Data coding would tell the hardware device High, low, repeat or on / off the soundwave coming out of it. Based upon the conversion of the electrical signal in the speaker to that pattern our ears picked it up like Doop Doop Doop.. Dip.. Ding.. Buzz.. and so on.

The Data wasn't actually converted to analog, but was instead sent in the 8-bits of data a particular pattern (say 10001111) would give High tone, sending another data pattern (11001110) would make it almost sound like wobbly signal, and so on. Remember speakers take the pulse of the electrical signal and 'vibrate' against the air that pattern which causes the audio we hear (sound is vibration in modulated tones and frequencies of air molecules moving).


Does that help?
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August 4, 2013 8:00:36 PM

Tom Tancredi said:
Okay you would have to be specific (article, forum post, something) to get more of a solid answer. Now let me point out a few things, no one does "8-bit" that is what was done more then 20 years ago, coding in 8-Bits (1Byte), as compared to our GigaByte working in 64-Bit (8Byte) code world.

Now back when, say 1980s (ancient for you kids) we didn't have Internet, cellphone, youtube, not even webpages. But when the first games ever released (Pong, Breakout, Asteroids, etc.) they were 8-bit coded games. In the coding was a mechinism or series of waves, sent from the coding to the Audio Device (think of the tinny speaker in your deaktop that BEEPS). That was simple positive and minus lines to the speaker, and could 'modulate' the frequency high, low, repeatedly, or just on and off. Based on this the Data coding would tell the hardware device High, low, repeat or on / off the soundwave coming out of it. Based upon the conversion of the electrical signal in the speaker to that pattern our ears picked it up like Doop Doop Doop.. Dip.. Ding.. Buzz.. and so on.

The Data wasn't actually converted to analog, but was instead sent in the 8-bits of data a particular pattern (say 10001111) would give High tone, sending another data pattern (11001110) would make it almost sound like wobbly signal, and so on. Remember speakers take the pulse of the electrical signal and 'vibrate' against the air that pattern which causes the audio we hear (sound is vibration in modulated tones and frequencies of air molecules moving).


Does that help?


yea the last paragraph was what i was looking for. So 8 bit vs 24 bit would just provide a more dynamic range of frequencies? and increasing bit rate/depth would simply increase the rate that the frequencies were emitted? say a 41khz vs 192khz signal. lol "little speaker"X)
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