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SSD improve MMO performance?

Tags:
  • Video Games
  • SSD
  • World Of Warcraft
  • Performance
Last response: in PC Gaming
July 8, 2013 9:04:45 AM

I know people will suggest an SSD to improve game startup/load times, but will it have much gameplay effect in an MMO like GW2, WoW, or Neverwinter? I read a lot about CPU vs GPU, but does the hard drive play much of a roll in gameplay outside of startup?

More about : ssd improve mmo performance

July 8, 2013 9:15:40 AM

From experience it does not, the things that you mentioned are what really improve. However the best and most cost effective way to increase game speeds is with SSD Caching. (Not talking about frames)
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July 8, 2013 9:21:16 AM

avacadobread said:
From experience it does not, the things that you mentioned are what really improve. However the best and most cost effective way to increase game speeds is with SSD Caching. (Not talking about frames)


Ok that's what I figured. I'll probably just use the money for a better GPU/CPU. I play far more online games (typical MMOs, SC2, LoL) than nononline (there's got to be a better word for that...) so the SSD probably isn't the best place to sink money?

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July 8, 2013 9:36:06 AM

If you have a Z77 Mobo really take advantage of the SSD Caching (or look into it first), that will help out a game after playing it for a long time. The next time you start it up it will just load things that are not dependent on the CPU/GPU so much faster
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July 8, 2013 10:11:03 AM

SSD improves transfer of data in the system. So, taking an example of a game which has loading areas, GW2 or ME3, this will improve loading times.

Would performance in your opinion be improved frame rates or perhaps more detailed graphics of the game?

If you are looking for best overall performance, you might consider RAM drive. Install game on it and load it at start up (SSD would make a drastic speed difference).
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July 8, 2013 10:52:04 PM

yhikum said:
SSD improves transfer of data in the system. So, taking an example of a game which has loading areas, GW2 or ME3, this will improve loading times.

Would performance in your opinion be improved frame rates or perhaps more detailed graphics of the game?

If you are looking for best overall performance, you might consider RAM drive. Install game on it and load it at start up (SSD would make a drastic speed difference).


I was thinking of both improved frame rates while having detailed graphics? Also what is a RAM drive? Is that not an SSD? I'm weighing the benefits of a couple seconds reduced load time of a game (which are the SSD benefits?) vs actual in-game play (GPU/CPU). Also as far as future upgradability is it better to buy the nice GPU/CPU now and get the SSD later or try to average out the price on all 3 (SSD/GPU/CPU) initially?
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Best solution

July 9, 2013 12:40:38 AM

SSDs help with loading and start ups. It won't for example help FPS. Also, it will load a zone faster(for MMOs) but once you are in it, it won't do much. It seems though some games benefit a little more from SSDs than others but you have to figure in the price of the SSD to save a second or three.

Now RAM drives, they blow away any SSD in speed. I use RAM drives because I have a lot of RAM. I would recommend at least 8gbs of RAM if you want to use a RAM drive.

What is a RAM drive? A RAM drive uses your regular RAM(memory) and and loads and unloads the info very quickly. Instead having to send it back and forth to a much slower SSD or HDD.

I would spend the money on CPU/GPU and get a SSD if you feel you need one. CPU/GPU is going to have a MUCH bigger impact in gaming than a SSD.

Happy gaming, the Prisoner...

PS: I forgot this. I have friend who is really into flight simulations(or any game where scenery changes fast) type games. Has the special chair and all the controllers. And he says SSDs improve the graphics a bit because they can somewhat keep up with the scenery changes. BUT he also uses RAM drives like me so the output is influenced in terms of using both at the same time which would probably be the best thing to do.
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July 9, 2013 5:58:43 AM

CPU is the number one thing that determines MMO performance.
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November 28, 2013 4:47:02 AM

Mooncheesebaby said:
avacadobread said:
From experience it does not, the things that you mentioned are what really improve. However the best and most cost effective way to increase game speeds is with SSD Caching. (Not talking about frames)


Ok that's what I figured. I'll probably just use the money for a better GPU/CPU. I play far more online games (typical MMOs, SC2, LoL) than nononline (there's got to be a better word for that...) so the SSD probably isn't the best place to sink money?



First of all, the word you are looking for is offline. As in, WoW is an mmo, and Warcraft 1, 2, or 3, is an offline game. Second, even if you don't play offline games, an ssd drive is still a descent investment. It can improve boot times of your OS. Third, chances are you are going to pay less upgrading to a ssd, than upgrading a gpu. I don't know what your build or budget is, but unless you got an ivy bridge CPU, preferably overclock able, (I guess an AMD equivalent would work. I avoid AMD like it's the plague) and a minimum of 8 GB of ram, on a 64 bit edition of Windows, I would work on those first. But that is just me.
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November 28, 2013 7:32:02 AM

The Canadian Prince said:
Mooncheesebaby said:
avacadobread said:
From experience it does not, the things that you mentioned are what really improve. However the best and most cost effective way to increase game speeds is with SSD Caching. (Not talking about frames)


Ok that's what I figured. I'll probably just use the money for a better GPU/CPU. I play far more online games (typical MMOs, SC2, LoL) than nononline (there's got to be a better word for that...) so the SSD probably isn't the best place to sink money?



First of all, the word you are looking for is offline. As in, WoW is an mmo, and Warcraft 1, 2, or 3, is an offline game. Second, even if you don't play offline games, an ssd drive is still a descent investment. It can improve boot times of your OS. Third, chances are you are going to pay less upgrading to a ssd, than upgrading a gpu. I don't know what your build or budget is, but unless you got an ivy bridge CPU, preferably overclock able, (I guess an AMD equivalent would work. I avoid AMD like it's the plague) and a minimum of 8 GB of ram, on a 64 bit edition of Windows, I would work on those first. But that is just me.


The OP already got his answer 5 months ago.
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