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Setting up an wireless access point on a different phone line socket?

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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July 10, 2013 11:33:00 AM

I've been reading around the subject, and found that after setting up a router as an access point you have to plug it into 1 of your router's LAN ports, my question is: would I have to do this if I plugged the access point into the same phone line but a different socket (in another room) than the actual router?
I'd be using a D-link 2680 as the router and a linksys wrt54g as the access point.

Thanks in advance.
July 10, 2013 11:46:37 AM

Please don't double post! :-)

Routers don't typically plug into telephone lines. Are you thinking of a modem instead?

Is it an in-wall network jack, perhaps? If your home is wired for Ethernet, you could interconnect your router and access point in that fashion.

You typically only use a single modem in a home environment, but it is possible to run multiple routers from it.

When using a router as only an access point, you typically disable the DHCP server so there are no conflicts with any other routers. The reason you connect a LAN port on the main router to the access point is to attach to the same network, which allows traffic to pass between the devices, and one DHCP server to handle all requests.
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July 10, 2013 12:26:56 PM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
Please don't double post! :-)

Routers don't typically plug into telephone lines. Are you thinking of a modem instead?

Is it an in-wall network jack, perhaps? If your home is wired for Ethernet, you could interconnect your router and access point in that fashion.

You typically only use a single modem in a home environment, but it is possible to run multiple routers from it.

When using a router as only an access point, you typically disable the DHCP server so there are no conflicts with any other routers. The reason you connect a LAN port on the main router to the access point is to attach to the same network, which allows traffic to pass between the devices, and one DHCP server to handle all requests.


sorry about the double post, too be honest I'm not really sure I don't know much about networking, I think my router has a built in modem since I just plug into the wall with an adsl filter. Would it be possible to have two networks or can I not do that from one line?
sorry I can't give much more detail
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July 10, 2013 2:03:30 PM

Yes, you can have two networks. You don't usually have more than one public IP address exposed to the internet however, so at some point, most of the equipment will need to be connected together in the chain.

It's not uncommon for an ISP to provide an integrated modem / router solution.

Maybe if you could propose what you had in mind, there is an easier explanation?

Do you perhaps want a network for guests to use, that is separate from your main network?

A network for the kids, that you can put on a timer switch to cut off internet access at predefined times?
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July 10, 2013 2:18:26 PM

Quote:
Maybe if you could propose what you had in mind, there is an easier explanation?

well pretty much, I don't get a good connection in the room where my computer is, that's when I thought of using another router as an access point since it is a better router than the one my isp provided. kind of like a private router for me to use while others kept using the supplied router, although if I could set it up like its own network with its own name and stuff that would be great!
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Best solution

July 10, 2013 6:51:08 PM

Sure, you can easy set your second router up as it's own network. :-) If all you would like is a separate network, all you need to do is run an Ethernet cable from one of the numbered, wired Ethernet ports (assuming you have more than one Ethernet port on your modem / router combo device from your ISP) of your modem / router to the WAN plug of the router you wish to create a second network with.

The only thing left to do at that point will be to go through the initial setup for your newly attached router, bearing in mind, this particular configuration will create two isolated networks. Devices that are attached to your modem / router by Ethernet cable or wirelessly, will not readily be able to communicate with devices that are connected to the second router, but all devices should have access to the internet.

Keep in mind, if you have poor wireless reception, changing channels on the router may help, especially since you plan to run two separate wireless stations. Also, the orientation of the antenna in or attached to the router and on your device accessing it should be parallel for best reception. Metal or magnetic devices will likely cause great attenuation or degradation of your wireless signal.

Another alternative, if you are unfamiliar would be, Ethernet Over Power line. This uses a pair of devices which plug into a electrical wall receptacle and extends Ethernet signals through house wiring to any other Ethernet Over Power line device connected to the same house electrical circuit. If an electrical outlet near your current modem / router and an outlet near the computer you are having the poor reception at reside on the same electrical circuit, you could try using a pair of devices such as this:

http://www.newegg.com/Powerline-Networking/SubCategory/...

The only caveat to Ethernet Over Power line devices is an inability to predict or guarantee any particular level of performance, and they can not be behind any sort of power strip or surge suppressor. As with wireless devices, mileage varies, and sometimes changing outlets can yield significant performance gains.

Just throwing that out there to show there are alternatives to wireless in some cases. :-)
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July 11, 2013 12:32:09 AM

Wow this is great! I had a brief look at powerline adapters but I don't think I'll use them though. Thank you for all your help, much appreciated.
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