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Question about the OEM version of Windows 7

Last response: in Windows 7
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July 11, 2013 10:48:46 PM

Hi.

Before you say it. Yes I did read the stickied thread about windows 7. But the part about OEM didn't really answer my questions. It made me more confused.

Long story short I've lost my old copy of windows 7. Case and all. I have no idea where it went. Apparently it got absorbed into the Aether or something.

And I've finished building my first pc (for games) and now I need an operating system.

And I saw how much cheaper the OEM version is compared to the 'full' one (about $80)

After some extensive google searching on it I still came up dry.

From what I have gathered from it. OEM is supposed to be fore manufacturers or resellers to pre install windows on computers they build for other people. However most online retailers parade the OEM around for general public use and a lot of people seem to buy it to just use for themselves. And also that you can only install the OEM to one machine.

That part I vaguely understand.

The things I want to know are.

TL;dr

If I were to say, purchase a OEM version of Windows 7 Home premium 64 bit from say newegg or amazon. And I got it. Hypothetically speaking of course (totally not going to break any license agreements, no sir). Would installing it be the exact same process? Like if I plopped the disk into the tray would that be it? Exact same installation as if I were to have gotten the full version and put it into the cd drive? No extra hoops to jump through?

Because $90 is a whole lot more appealing than $170 right now. Moneys pretty tight.

Sorry to have asked this but I really couldn't find a straight answer anywhere and I just want to get on with it and setup my pc to play games on.

Thank you for your time.
July 11, 2013 10:55:16 PM

Idk I think I have the full version because I've used my windows 7 disk on 3 computers I own
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Best solution

July 11, 2013 10:55:43 PM

It's the same procedure. The only major difference between a retail copy and a OEM copy is the key (assuming you are using the same sub-version aka "Ultimate" or "Professional". A retail version of "Ultimate" is the same as a OEM version of "Ultimate", in other words.)

If you wanted to dance around the reason for OEM's it's actually legal to build the PC yourself, sell it to a friend for say, 1 penny, and buy it back for the same 1 penny. Technically you did build the system and sell it, fulfilling your part of the OEM agreement, (but don't quote me, I'm not a lawyer. That's just my understanding of the license.)

Also another thing different is support. Retail versions get support from Microsoft and can call a 1 800 number. OEM's, you are the support.

Hope it helps!
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July 11, 2013 10:59:44 PM

nosupport4u said:
It's the same procedure. The only major difference between a retail copy and a OEM copy is the key (assuming you are using the same sub-version aka "Ultimate" or "Professional".)

If you wanted to dance around the reason for OEM's it's actually legal to build the PC yourself, sell it to a friend for say, 1 penny, and buy it back for the same 1 penny. Technically you did build the system and sell it ,fulfilling your part of the OEM agreement, (but don't quote me, I'm not a lawyer. That's just my understanding of the license.)

Also another thing different, is support. Retail versions get support from Microsoft and can call a 1 800 number. OEM's, you are the support.

Hope it helps!


Thank you. That does help.

Although I'm a bit confused with your first paragraph.

What do you mean by "The only major difference between a retail copy and a OEM copy is the key (assuming you are using the same sub-version aka "Ultimate" or "Professional".)"?

Are you stating that the only difference is the normal difference between premium,profession, and ultimate? Or is there something else you have to do different for the oem version?

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July 11, 2013 11:01:46 PM

I have edited my original post to make more sense. Hopefully it does.
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July 11, 2013 11:09:44 PM

nosupport4u said:
I have edited my original post to make more sense. Hopefully it does.


Ah, Thanks. That does clear it up a lot.

So it's literally just the same thing except no microsoft support and only installs on one pc? Absolutely nothing else I'd have to do extra?

I apologize for the onslaught of questions it's just that moving from OSX and all the years of having to go through hoops to make anything work I'm very, very tiered of having to go through hoops for things.

So I want to make sure I won't have to do that at all/very little.

Also is this the correct windows 7 home premium oem? Just want to make sure I get the right thing.
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July 11, 2013 11:25:07 PM

O Possum said:
nosupport4u said:
I have edited my original post to make more sense. Hopefully it does.


Ah, Thanks. That does clear it up a lot.

So it's literally just the same thing except no microsoft support and only installs on one pc? Absolutely nothing else I'd have to do extra?

I apologize for the onslaught of questions it's just that moving from OSX and all the years of having to go through hoops to make anything work I'm very, very tiered of having to go through hoops for things.

So I want to make sure I won't have to do that at all/very little.

Also is this the correct windows 7 home premium oem? Just want to make sure I get the right thing.


Yup, you should be fine with that. Personally I would go professional, but that has a lot of features most end users won't ever use (so the extra price isn't worth it for most). I won't go in to the differences between subversions. Their are a LOT of places you can do that kind of comparison. As far as installing it on multiple PC's, I don't think Retail really allows that, at least not legally, but since I am not 100% on the matter I can't make any really valid comments. On OEM it's one key, one machine. That's it. Pretty sure that's across the board though (so to the person saying they have retail on 3 different machines, I kind of doubt it.)

Oh, one other thing between retail and OEM. Retail you have an "upgrade" option. Like upgrade from Vista to 7. OEM is clean install only.
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July 12, 2013 12:39:36 AM

OK, this is the official licensing scheme for Windows 7. Bare in mind that technically, you can do a lot of stuff and maybe buy any kind of license but you won't always be legal. That might not matter in your home where you probably won't get audited for software, but if you're planning on using Windows in your office/company, ALWAYS go by the book.
In Windows 7 there are 3 types of license:

1) OEM is strictly for computer manufacturer (companies and retailers that make their own branded pcs). If you have found an OEM version available for purchase, it's wrong. OEM packages cannot be sold in stores to end-users. Also, you will get absolutely no support from Microsoft for an OEM version, as this is typically the responsibility of the manufafcturer.

2) DSP is a similar package (for new PCs, basic packaging with one disc only 32 or 64bit, cheaper than retail version, non-transferrable). You can buy this version with a new PC (or within 60 days of purchase).

3) FPP (Full Package Product) is the full retail version. It contains 32 and 64bit discs, you can buy it any time and also remove it from one system to install in another.

If you want to be legal in terms of licensing, your options are 2 or 3 for a new PC and 3 for an older one.
In Windows 8 BTW, there is an option to buy OEM version as an end-user (You have to buy it sealed and install it yourself). You can activate what is called a "Personal-Use license" so in essence you are the "manufacturer".

http://personaluselicense.windows.com/en-US/default.asp...

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July 12, 2013 4:24:23 AM

fixxxer113 said:
OK, this is the official licensing scheme for Windows 7. Bare in mind that technically, you can do a lot of stuff and maybe buy any kind of license but you won't always be legal. That might not matter in your home where you probably won't get audited for software, but if you're planning on using Windows in your office/company, ALWAYS go by the book.
In Windows 7 there are 3 types of license:

1) OEM is strictly for computer manufacturer (companies and retailers that make their own branded pcs). If you have found an OEM version available for purchase, it's wrong. OEM packages cannot be sold in stores to end-users. Also, you will get absolutely no support from Microsoft for an OEM version, as this is typically the responsibility of the manufafcturer.

2) DSP is a similar package (for new PCs, basic packaging with one disc only 32 or 64bit, cheaper than retail version, non-transferrable). You can buy this version with a new PC (or within 60 days of purchase).

3) FPP (Full Package Product) is the full retail version. It contains 32 and 64bit discs, you can buy it any time and also remove it from one system to install in another.

If you want to be legal in terms of licensing, your options are 2 or 3 for a new PC and 3 for an older one.
In Windows 8 BTW, there is an option to buy OEM version as an end-user (You have to buy it sealed and install it yourself). You can activate what is called a "Personal-Use license" so in essence you are the "manufacturer".

http://personaluselicense.windows.com/en-US/default.asp...



Good information there, but a lot of places sell OEM's over the counter like it's nothing. I know of 2 stores that are Microsoft partners that sell them in this fashion. OEM is a tricky title, because as I made an example of earlier, you can technically sell the computer to someone and buy it back for a penny and your license will be valid. MS has a strange way of licensing, as least with their OEM stuff.

I would just say the hell with WIndows and go Linux (lots of choices!) J/K!

I think the OP has as much info as they need now, and I am just busting Fixxxer113's chops a little. He provided some damn good info. Nice work, and to the OP I hope this info all helps!
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July 12, 2013 8:33:06 AM

Yeah. I think I've made my mind up.

I'll most definitely go with the windows 7 oem version. Might sell it to my dog then see if he wants to sell it back to me.

Thanks for all the info.

As for what you said about Linux, never used it. Plus my pc is going to be for games mostly.

7 is better than 8 for games tho. Right?
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a c 465 4 Gaming
a c 416 $ Windows 7
July 12, 2013 8:47:25 AM

Go with windows 8 OEM because it can be transferred to a new computer when you are not using the current one anymore, Windows 7 OEM is tied to the first motherboard it's installed on. Games run the same on 8.




OEM versions of Windows 7 are identical to Full License Retail versions except for the following:

- OEM versions do not offer any free Microsoft direct support from Microsoft support personnel

- OEM licenses are tied to the very first computer you install and activate it on

- OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard

- OEM versions cannot be used to directly upgrade from an older Windows operating system


Microsoft.com ^


OEM vs. Retail

OEM Windows 7 comes preinstalled on computers. This is the cheapest way to buy windows. Large PC manufacturers like Dell, HP etc. (collectively called royalty OEMs) install windows on millions of such PCs. The main characteristics of such systems are:

The license agreement and support agreement is between you and the PC maker, not MS.

Activation by the end user is not required. Windows is preactivated at the factory by the OEM using images and standard SLP keys.

Your copy of windows is locked to that PC. The license is not transferable.

OEM system builder is what you get when you buy from say Newegg or from a local "white box" vendor. It too has the characteristics of Royalty OEM windows. Although it is possible for an individual to buy a System Builder copy, the license requires that the software be installed using the OPK (OEM preinstall kit) and then resold.

Retail version is what you buy from a retailer like Amazon or Bestbuy. Its a full price version that comes packaged in a retail box with a retail product key. It has to be activated online via MS servers using the key on the box, it is not tied to the PC it was first installed on, though it can only be used on a single computer at a time. And, MS directly provides the support for it. It is also more expensive than OEM copies.

As far as functionality is concerned, theres no difference between any of the versions above, given any specific edition (i.e. between OEM pro and retail pro, or between OEM ultimate and retail ultimate).

sevenforums.com





Windows 8 OEM is a whole different ballgame.

License agreement for the transfer of a Windows 8 license
http://personaluselicense.windows.com/en-US/default.asp...


Don't forget to choose a Best Solution when opening a question thread , the forum members will appreciate that.Thanks for posting on the forum.

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