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Arctic Haswell (new gaming build)

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July 12, 2013 2:24:50 PM

Hows it going everybody so I took a lot of things into consideration while doing this build, first off I already had the CPU (i5 4670k) so that wasn't really questioned at all. I just wanted to try a quick run through to make sure everything worked together or some suggestions to maybe improve it.

I am excluding the processor from this build because I already own it. My budget is $770 max (essentially $1000 if you take into account the $230 i5-4670K).

Without Further Ado:


PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1fYYP
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1fYYP/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1fYYP/benchmarks/

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.95 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus GRYPHON Z87 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Wintec One 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.72 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($56.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($286.13 @ Newegg)
Case: Inwin GT1 White ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 550W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($79.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $769.75
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-12 17:13 EDT-0400)


Part Choice Breakdown:

CPU Cooler: I am planning on overclocking but all I have currently is the stock cooler but I am on a budget and this is the best bang for your buck cooler.

Motherboard: I am very fond of this series and if I had the money I would definitely go for the Sabertooth, but I am on a tight budget and this still has the awesome reliability I am looking for so it will have to do.

Memory: Cheap DDR3-1600 memory, problem solved.

Storage: 1Tb 7200 RPM is enough for what I need, I have used this hard drive by itself before and I am more than happy without an SSD (if you somehow manage to find a way to sneak one in that would be cool though)

Video Card: Best cooling system out of all the variants (in my opinion) and I personally opted for AMD>Nvidia because amd graphics cards in general overclock a bit better than Nvidia and as I said this was primarily an overclock build so I went with the 7950 (the free games don't hurt too badly either)

Case: This along with the motherboard are the two things I am the most open about in this build. I want a white case that is as small as possible, has options for liquid cooling in the future, has a window, but isn't entirely white (ex: the white fractal design case) If you can recommend something better that fits my budget than fire away.

Power Supply:
Again like the motherboard I am looking for reliability and going with a Seasonic G-Series PSU is about as reliable as it gets for this price.

Let me know what ya guys think and or if you have any changes, just remember I am ok with the price dropping a bit but it can not be above $770 USD.


P.S. Not a requirement but if you are suggesting a different case if you happened to find one that had the other requirements and had a sturdy handle as well (cm storm scout 2) that would be nice, though this is definitely the last priority.

Best solution

a c 275 4 Gaming
July 12, 2013 2:40:46 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($63.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($56.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($286.13 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $746.07
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-12 17:33 EDT-0400)

-ATX motherboard. Has more features (more sata connectors, pcie slots, etc.) and not overpriced.
-Better quality RAM. Wintec is more of a budget RAM. Also low-profile so you can install the Hyper 212 EVO without any troubles (sometimes large heat spreaders get in the way).
-Better case. The Define R4 is optimized for silence through the use of silence-dampening foam in the case. Also provides great airflow.
-XFX psus are made by Seasonic, so they are extremely reliable. Also, this particular psu is on a great deal. 750w, high quality and semi-modular for $55 is extremely good. It's cheaper than the XFX 550w non-modular one.

Edit: Okay. I didn't see what you said about the case. Here's some options for your requirements:

Bitfenix Shinobi: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/bitfenix-case-bfcsnb150www...
NZXT Phantom 410: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/nzxt-case-caph410w1
Corsair C70: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-case-c70arcticwhit...

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a b 4 Gaming
July 12, 2013 2:42:16 PM

You're not giving yourself much overhead on that power supply. If you ever plan on OC'ing your video card or CPU.... you might want something a little more robust. Seasonic makes great supplies. I am only saying you are near the minimum requirements for this build.
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July 12, 2013 3:40:14 PM

realchaos said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($63.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($56.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($286.13 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $746.07
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-12 17:33 EDT-0400)

-ATX motherboard. Has more features (more sata connectors, pcie slots, etc.) and not overpriced.
-Better quality RAM. Wintec is more of a budget RAM. Also low-profile so you can install the Hyper 212 EVO without any troubles (sometimes large heat spreaders get in the way).
-Better case. The Define R4 is optimized for silence through the use of silence-dampening foam in the case. Also provides great airflow.
-XFX psus are made by Seasonic, so they are extremely reliable. Also, this particular psu is on a great deal. 750w, high quality and semi-modular for $55 is extremely good. It's cheaper than the XFX 550w non-modular one.

Edit: Okay. I didn't see what you said about the case. Here's some options for your requirements:

Bitfenix Shinobi: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/bitfenix-case-bfcsnb150www...
NZXT Phantom 410: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/nzxt-case-caph410w1
Corsair C70: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-case-c70arcticwhit...




Took a lot of your suggestions into thought one thing to note about the PSU is it is only $55 with mail-in-rebates and unfortunately I personally hate MIR's with a passion for some unknown reason (sorry its just a weird personal preference) So I did opt for a different power supply that still gets effecient power amounts. Here is what I am at so far:

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1g0Dr
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1g0Dr/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1g0Dr/benchmarks/

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($63.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($56.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($306.13 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($84.50 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Cooler Master i600 600W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $770.58
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-12 18:33 EDT-0400)


Changed to your recommended motherboard, RAM, and Case. The thing I changed on my own was the Power Supply. Normally I only go with seasonic but cooler master also makes some solid power supplies and what stood out to me about this particular series is that cooler master offers that 5 year warranty with this series just like Seasonic does with their G-series. Having a 5 year warranty on something that is most like to receive damage (PSU and or motherboards) means that the company is pretty darn confident in that particular product. It also keeps a nice efficiency rating as well, (it also has a MIR but meh). It comes in at like 576 total usable watts i think which I hope is enough for my overclocking. Any other suggestions or recommendations?

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a b 4 Gaming
July 12, 2013 3:51:14 PM

Just want to reference my post. The minimum recommended PSU for your GPU is 500W. You're also installing an 84W CPU. Granted, these will not always be under max loads but, once you factor in an overclock with a heavy workload, you may start approaching the efficiency down slope on this PSU also.
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July 12, 2013 3:59:10 PM

skit75 said:
Just want to reference my post. The minimum recommended PSU for your GPU is 500W. You're also installing an 84W CPU. Granted, these will not always be under max loads but, once you factor in an overclock with a heavy workload, you may start approaching the efficiency down slope on this PSU also.



Hop onto pc partpicker as well, it will show you the stock power consumptions as well, so yes while the minimum for that gpu is 500w it in reality only consumes about 300w, (plus it is also considering the fact that not everyone gets an efficient PSU as well) The entire system as a whole consumes roughly 400 watts which leaves roughly 175 watts of cushion for overclocking. Though I will give you that it may not be the most accurate, so when plugged into newegg's wattage calculator it came out as 517 which leaves about 50 watts cushion (idk how much is recommended for an overclock) if you have an alternative power supply I am open to recommendations as long as it fits the budget.
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a b 4 Gaming
July 12, 2013 4:16:16 PM

80 Plus PSUs will be most efficient at 50% load. The numbers don't sway far but your supply will run cooler if you can get a supply that makes your 400W(actual consumption), the 50% load mark to achieve peak efficiency.

Cheers!
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a c 275 4 Gaming
July 12, 2013 4:18:34 PM

Coolermaster psu's aren't that high in quality. If you can, this will be a great psu: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/xfx-power-supply-p1550sxxb...
Buy it from amazon for the $61 price without MIR. Much higher quality and much more reliable.

Also, a quality 550w is enough for overclocking and having the 7950. AMD recommends 500w for a lot of their gpu. They recommend 500w for the 7850 and 7950, so you can tell that it's not very accurate. IMHO, PcPartPicker is one of the best power supply calculator.
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