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Which CPU for New Build

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July 14, 2013 10:26:09 PM

OK, I'm about to spend the big bucks on building a very high performance system and need some big picture advice.

There's Gen 2 (Sandy Bridge), Gen 3 (Ivey Bridge), and now Gen 4 (Haswell). My choice should be easy--build the latest to get the top performance. Except I have found it's not that easy at all. Compared to Sandy Bridge, Ivey Bridge is a smaller geometry but that in and of itself is no big deal I think. Haswell is an overblown design with lower power consumption (no big thing in a desktop) and on-board graphics (no biggie either with a GTX 780 in the picture).

I'm left with neither of these are really better that the "old" Sandy Bridge with X79 architecture. I understand the need for new sales with each new generation but I don't own stock in any of these companies, I'm just looking for the fastest computer for gaming, video encoding, and GIS and other demanding applications. I understand that any of these Gens can do a great job with any of these apps. To be honest, I want a box that's way beyond what I really need just like most want.

Later Gen processors may have more recent software for OCing and other performance enhancements. Does that mean I should go with Haswell just because it's better supported?

From where I sit the "old" Sandy Bridge with X79 is still the best going. True? False? What do you think?

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July 14, 2013 10:47:24 PM

You hit the nail on the head ..... Sandy Bridge overclocks way better than Ivy Bridge which in turn overclocks a bit better than Haswell. So on a performance basis ya can make a good argument for any one of them on the desktop. However, 1155 is a dead socket, lose ya MoBo in a year and you may find yaself in the same position as the user whose box is currently on my dining room table..... he has a dead 1156 board and ya can't buy a decent replacement anywhere.

Haswell uses the new 1150 socket and from a longevity standpoint will leave ya with the most options down the road.
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July 14, 2013 10:55:45 PM

mmoody888 said:
OK, I'm about to spend the big bucks on building a very high performance system and need some big picture advice.

There's Gen 2 (Sandy Bridge), Gen 3 (Ivey Bridge), and now Gen 4 (Haswell). My choice should be easy--build the latest to get the top performance. Except I have found it's not that easy at all. Compared to Sandy Bridge, Ivey Bridge is a smaller geometry but that in and of itself is no big deal I think. Haswell is an overblown design with lower power consumption (no big thing in a desktop) and on-board graphics (no biggie either with a GTX 780 in the picture).

I'm left with neither of these are really better that the "old" Sandy Bridge with X79 architecture. I understand the need for new sales with each new generation but I don't own stock in any of these companies, I'm just looking for the fastest computer for gaming, video encoding, and GIS and other demanding applications. I understand that any of these Gens can do a great job with any of these apps. To be honest, I want a box that's way beyond what I really need just like most want.

Later Gen processors may have more recent software for OCing and other performance enhancements. Does that mean I should go with Haswell just because it's better supported?

From where I sit the "old" Sandy Bridge with X79 is still the best going. True? False? What do you think?


The Best CPU today is the SandyBridge-E it is the only one that gives you 6 cores.

Haswell is no match for it. but there is a problem

SandyBridge-E does not support PCIexpress 3.0 , only 2.0

BUT , if you dont want to overclock , you can pick Sandy Bridge Xeon chips , the all have PCIe 3.0 support AND up to 8 cores

the 3.1 GHZ 8 cores is expensive though ..

but if you are rich , you can go for it.

SandyBridge-E alsos support 4 channels DDR3 memory , and upto 64G on normal and upto 256G of Ram in Xeons.

so it is up to you.

tell me if you need more info , or if you want to overclock or not.
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July 18, 2013 10:51:50 PM

sna said:
mmoody888 said:
OK, I'm about to spend the big bucks on building a very high performance system and need some big picture advice.

There's Gen 2 (Sandy Bridge), Gen 3 (Ivey Bridge), and now Gen 4 (Haswell). My choice should be easy--build the latest to get the top performance. Except I have found it's not that easy at all. Compared to Sandy Bridge, Ivey Bridge is a smaller geometry but that in and of itself is no big deal I think. Haswell is an overblown design with lower power consumption (no big thing in a desktop) and on-board graphics (no biggie either with a GTX 780 in the picture).

I'm left with neither of these are really better that the "old" Sandy Bridge with X79 architecture. I understand the need for new sales with each new generation but I don't own stock in any of these companies, I'm just looking for the fastest computer for gaming, video encoding, and GIS and other demanding applications. I understand that any of these Gens can do a great job with any of these apps. To be honest, I want a box that's way beyond what I really need just like most want.

Later Gen processors may have more recent software for OCing and other performance enhancements. Does that mean I should go with Haswell just because it's better supported?

From where I sit the "old" Sandy Bridge with X79 is still the best going. True? False? What do you think?


The Best CPU today is the SandyBridge-E it is the only one that gives you 6 cores.

Haswell is no match for it. but there is a problem

SandyBridge-E does not support PCIexpress 3.0 , only 2.0

BUT , if you dont want to overclock , you can pick Sandy Bridge Xeon chips , the all have PCIe 3.0 support AND up to 8 cores

the 3.1 GHZ 8 cores is expensive though ..

but if you are rich , you can go for it.

SandyBridge-E alsos support 4 channels DDR3 memory , and upto 64G on normal and upto 256G of Ram in Xeons.

so it is up to you.

tell me if you need more info , or if you want to overclock or not.


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July 18, 2013 10:55:21 PM

I have heard that PCI 2.0 is fast enough that there's no practical difference to PCI 3.0. If this is true then I would probably go with Sandy Bridge and its better memory support. Xeon too rich for my blood.
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July 19, 2013 6:09:03 AM

mmoody888 said:
I have heard that PCI 2.0 is fast enough that there's no practical difference to PCI 3.0. If this is true then I would probably go with Sandy Bridge and its better memory support. Xeon too rich for my blood.



they are the same price ..

xeons and i7 ..

for the same clock and same cores .. the same price.
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