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Total Noob Looking to Build $1000 Gaming PC

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July 15, 2013 10:55:27 AM

Hey, guys. First off, I'd like to say that I am completely new to . . . everything. This forum, building computers, everything. Most extensive work I've ever done on a computer is when I upgraded the RAM on my old desktop. Anyway, I'm looking to build myself a gaming desktop for somewhere in the range of $1000. Under that is preferred, of course, but I'm willing to hit that mark if it can guarantee that I get a durable, mid-to-high-functioning gaming machine.
To be honest, I'm ignorant to the extent that I don't even know if that's reasonable. In any case, here are some specifics about what I'm looking to build as per theAnimal's "How To Ask" guide. ANY advice would be appreciated. I'm here to learn, and I'm sorry if I accidentally break any forum etiquette.
Approximate Purchase Date: August/September
Budget Range: $700-1100 (Before or after rebates, I don't honestly know.)
System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, watching movies, gaming, surfin' da webs, word processing. I already have a laptop that can really satisfy most of my needs. It's really just that it has trouble handling games that I'd like to play, even on the lowest graphics settings. I also have a tendency to hold extended gaming sessions (hours at a time) if I’m left with too much free time.
Parts Not Required: Keyboard, mouse. That's about it. I'm in the market for everything from a new monitor to a new OS. . . .
Preferred Website(s) for Parts: None, really. I have a Newegg account, and I have a passing familiarity with it, but I have no real loyalties on this front.
Country: 'MURICA.
Parts Preferences: None! Just like with the websites, I really have no loyalties. I really just want parts that'll get the job done well and underbudget.
Overclocking: Maybe. Dunno how I feel about it. As I understand it, you get better performance, but risk your CPU's wellbeing to an extent, right? I'd generally prefer to err on the side of caution, but I've been told it's not actually all that risky. . . .
SLI or Crossfire: I don't even know what this means.
Monitor Resolution: God, I really don't know. I think the laptop I'm on right now is 1366 x 768, which is just fine for me, but I wouldn't mind something a bit larger. I will probably have to be transporting this monitor (I'm in college, so I move in and out of the dorms a few times per year) by myself, so something manageable is preferred. I have no muscle mass.
Additional Comments: I'd like the computer to be on the quiet side, if that's possible. It's not a big enough sticking point to me that I'd compromise performance, efficiency, or price for it, though. I'd also prefer a build that I could fit in a fairly portable case because, again, I'm probably going to have to carry it up or down a hefty flight of stairs at some point.

Really, though, I can't stress enough that performance and efficiency are paramount. The main reason I want to build my own machine is that I've been saddled with computers that couldn't quite perform on the level that I expected them to for most of my life. That said, I don't really expect to be playing the latest games at full graphical capacity or anything--more like 50% to 70% of that. I also want this rig to last me at least 6 years, with upgrades as needed, of course. I was also thinking of getting both an SSD on which to store the OS and other important processes and a larger HDD for games, music, work stuff, and whatever, but I'd like a second opinion on this idea.

All that said, any suggestions, questions, and comments are welcome. Please keep in mind that I'm not extremely familiar with brands, and I only have a passing familiarity with the most general components of the machine (i.e. CPU, GPU, motherboard). Advice as far as techniques for deciding on components and/or putting the actual machine together is also greatly appreciated.
July 15, 2013 10:58:27 AM

commasplice said:
Hey, guys. First off, I'd like to say that I am completely new to . . . everything. This forum, building computers, everything. Most extensive work I've ever done on a computer is when I upgraded the RAM on my old desktop. Anyway, I'm looking to build myself a gaming desktop for somewhere in the range of $1000. Under that is preferred, of course, but I'm willing to hit that mark if it can guarantee that I get a durable, mid-to-high-functioning gaming machine.
To be honest, I'm ignorant to the extent that I don't even know if that's reasonable. In any case, here are some specifics about what I'm looking to build as per theAnimal's "How To Ask" guide. ANY advice would be appreciated. I'm here to learn, and I'm sorry if I accidentally break any forum etiquette.
Approximate Purchase Date: August/September
Budget Range: $700-1100 (Before or after rebates, I don't honestly know.)
System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, watching movies, gaming, surfin' da webs, word processing. I already have a laptop that can really satisfy most of my needs. It's really just that it has trouble handling games that I'd like to play, even on the lowest graphics settings. I also have a tendency to hold extended gaming sessions (hours at a time) if I’m left with too much free time.
Parts Not Required: Keyboard, mouse. That's about it. I'm in the market for everything from a new monitor to a new OS. . . .
Preferred Website(s) for Parts: None, really. I have a Newegg account, and I have a passing familiarity with it, but I have no real loyalties on this front.
Country: 'MURICA.
Parts Preferences: None! Just like with the websites, I really have no loyalties. I really just want parts that'll get the job done well and underbudget.
Overclocking: Maybe. Dunno how I feel about it. As I understand it, you get better performance, but risk your CPU's wellbeing to an extent, right? I'd generally prefer to err on the side of caution, but I've been told it's not actually all that risky. . . .
SLI or Crossfire: I don't even know what this means.
Monitor Resolution: God, I really don't know. I think the laptop I'm on right now is 1366 x 768, which is just fine for me, but I wouldn't mind something a bit larger. I will probably have to be transporting this monitor (I'm in college, so I move in and out of the dorms a few times per year) by myself, so something manageable is preferred. I have no muscle mass.
Additional Comments: I'd like the computer to be on the quiet side, if that's possible. It's not a big enough sticking point to me that I'd compromise performance, efficiency, or price for it, though. I'd also prefer a build that I could fit in a fairly portable case because, again, I'm probably going to have to carry it up or down a hefty flight of stairs at some point.

Really, though, I can't stress enough that performance and efficiency are paramount. The main reason I want to build my own machine is that I've been saddled with computers that couldn't quite perform on the level that I expected them to for most of my life. That said, I don't really expect to be playing the latest games at full graphical capacity or anything--more like 50% to 70% of that. I also want this rig to last me at least 6 years, with upgrades as needed, of course. I was also thinking of getting both an SSD on which to store the OS and other important processes and a larger HDD for games, music, work stuff, and whatever, but I'd like a second opinion on this idea.

All that said, any suggestions, questions, and comments are welcome. Please keep in mind that I'm not extremely familiar with brands, and I only have a passing familiarity with the most general components of the machine (i.e. CPU, GPU, motherboard). Advice as far as techniques for deciding on components and/or putting the actual machine together is also greatly appreciated.


Wait till September. ivybridge-e CPU are coming in sept.

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a b 4 Gaming
July 15, 2013 11:03:40 AM

sna said:
commasplice said:
Hey, guys. First off, I'd like to say that I am completely new to . . . everything. This forum, building computers, everything. Most extensive work I've ever done on a computer is when I upgraded the RAM on my old desktop. Anyway, I'm looking to build myself a gaming desktop for somewhere in the range of $1000. Under that is preferred, of course, but I'm willing to hit that mark if it can guarantee that I get a durable, mid-to-high-functioning gaming machine.
To be honest, I'm ignorant to the extent that I don't even know if that's reasonable. In any case, here are some specifics about what I'm looking to build as per theAnimal's "How To Ask" guide. ANY advice would be appreciated. I'm here to learn, and I'm sorry if I accidentally break any forum etiquette.
Approximate Purchase Date: August/September
Budget Range: $700-1100 (Before or after rebates, I don't honestly know.)
System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, watching movies, gaming, surfin' da webs, word processing. I already have a laptop that can really satisfy most of my needs. It's really just that it has trouble handling games that I'd like to play, even on the lowest graphics settings. I also have a tendency to hold extended gaming sessions (hours at a time) if I’m left with too much free time.
Parts Not Required: Keyboard, mouse. That's about it. I'm in the market for everything from a new monitor to a new OS. . . .
Preferred Website(s) for Parts: None, really. I have a Newegg account, and I have a passing familiarity with it, but I have no real loyalties on this front.
Country: 'MURICA.
Parts Preferences: None! Just like with the websites, I really have no loyalties. I really just want parts that'll get the job done well and underbudget.
Overclocking: Maybe. Dunno how I feel about it. As I understand it, you get better performance, but risk your CPU's wellbeing to an extent, right? I'd generally prefer to err on the side of caution, but I've been told it's not actually all that risky. . . .
SLI or Crossfire: I don't even know what this means.
Monitor Resolution: God, I really don't know. I think the laptop I'm on right now is 1366 x 768, which is just fine for me, but I wouldn't mind something a bit larger. I will probably have to be transporting this monitor (I'm in college, so I move in and out of the dorms a few times per year) by myself, so something manageable is preferred. I have no muscle mass.
Additional Comments: I'd like the computer to be on the quiet side, if that's possible. It's not a big enough sticking point to me that I'd compromise performance, efficiency, or price for it, though. I'd also prefer a build that I could fit in a fairly portable case because, again, I'm probably going to have to carry it up or down a hefty flight of stairs at some point.

Really, though, I can't stress enough that performance and efficiency are paramount. The main reason I want to build my own machine is that I've been saddled with computers that couldn't quite perform on the level that I expected them to for most of my life. That said, I don't really expect to be playing the latest games at full graphical capacity or anything--more like 50% to 70% of that. I also want this rig to last me at least 6 years, with upgrades as needed, of course. I was also thinking of getting both an SSD on which to store the OS and other important processes and a larger HDD for games, music, work stuff, and whatever, but I'd like a second opinion on this idea.

All that said, any suggestions, questions, and comments are welcome. Please keep in mind that I'm not extremely familiar with brands, and I only have a passing familiarity with the most general components of the machine (i.e. CPU, GPU, motherboard). Advice as far as techniques for deciding on components and/or putting the actual machine together is also greatly appreciated.


Wait till September. ivybridge-e CPU are coming in sept.



please tell me u're joking, Ivy Bridge-E for a gaming system with a $1k budget?
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Related resources
July 15, 2013 11:08:31 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1gM2v
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1gM2v/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1gM2v/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($63.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($92.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($66.61 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($339.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($52.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VS238H-P 23.0" Monitor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1274.47
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-15 14:08 EDT-0400)

Need a bigger budget to get a good gaming machine bro.
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July 15, 2013 11:16:50 AM

jinayhvora said:
sna said:
commasplice said:
Hey, guys. First off, I'd like to say that I am completely new to . . . everything. This forum, building computers, everything. Most extensive work I've ever done on a computer is when I upgraded the RAM on my old desktop. Anyway, I'm looking to build myself a gaming desktop for somewhere in the range of $1000. Under that is preferred, of course, but I'm willing to hit that mark if it can guarantee that I get a durable, mid-to-high-functioning gaming machine.
To be honest, I'm ignorant to the extent that I don't even know if that's reasonable. In any case, here are some specifics about what I'm looking to build as per theAnimal's "How To Ask" guide. ANY advice would be appreciated. I'm here to learn, and I'm sorry if I accidentally break any forum etiquette.
Approximate Purchase Date: August/September
Budget Range: $700-1100 (Before or after rebates, I don't honestly know.)
System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, watching movies, gaming, surfin' da webs, word processing. I already have a laptop that can really satisfy most of my needs. It's really just that it has trouble handling games that I'd like to play, even on the lowest graphics settings. I also have a tendency to hold extended gaming sessions (hours at a time) if I’m left with too much free time.
Parts Not Required: Keyboard, mouse. That's about it. I'm in the market for everything from a new monitor to a new OS. . . .
Preferred Website(s) for Parts: None, really. I have a Newegg account, and I have a passing familiarity with it, but I have no real loyalties on this front.
Country: 'MURICA.
Parts Preferences: None! Just like with the websites, I really have no loyalties. I really just want parts that'll get the job done well and underbudget.
Overclocking: Maybe. Dunno how I feel about it. As I understand it, you get better performance, but risk your CPU's wellbeing to an extent, right? I'd generally prefer to err on the side of caution, but I've been told it's not actually all that risky. . . .
SLI or Crossfire: I don't even know what this means.
Monitor Resolution: God, I really don't know. I think the laptop I'm on right now is 1366 x 768, which is just fine for me, but I wouldn't mind something a bit larger. I will probably have to be transporting this monitor (I'm in college, so I move in and out of the dorms a few times per year) by myself, so something manageable is preferred. I have no muscle mass.
Additional Comments: I'd like the computer to be on the quiet side, if that's possible. It's not a big enough sticking point to me that I'd compromise performance, efficiency, or price for it, though. I'd also prefer a build that I could fit in a fairly portable case because, again, I'm probably going to have to carry it up or down a hefty flight of stairs at some point.

Really, though, I can't stress enough that performance and efficiency are paramount. The main reason I want to build my own machine is that I've been saddled with computers that couldn't quite perform on the level that I expected them to for most of my life. That said, I don't really expect to be playing the latest games at full graphical capacity or anything--more like 50% to 70% of that. I also want this rig to last me at least 6 years, with upgrades as needed, of course. I was also thinking of getting both an SSD on which to store the OS and other important processes and a larger HDD for games, music, work stuff, and whatever, but I'd like a second opinion on this idea.

All that said, any suggestions, questions, and comments are welcome. Please keep in mind that I'm not extremely familiar with brands, and I only have a passing familiarity with the most general components of the machine (i.e. CPU, GPU, motherboard). Advice as far as techniques for deciding on components and/or putting the actual machine together is also greatly appreciated.


Wait till September. ivybridge-e CPU are coming in sept.



please tell me u're joking, Ivy Bridge-E for a gaming system with a $1k budget?



The Haswell will be cheaper when the Ivybridge-e comes.

and yes I can make a gaming machine for $1000 in SandyBridge-E today and using GTX 760 , 4 cores i7 and X79 motherboard

he said will buy in September... so it is wise to wait.

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a b 4 Gaming
July 15, 2013 11:27:24 AM

no offence, but Haswell and Ivy Bridge-E belong to completely different categories so Ivy-Bridge-E shouldn't make Haswell cheaper
also I really would like to see such a build
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July 15, 2013 11:38:00 AM

sna said:


Wait till September. ivybridge-e CPU are coming in sept.


I'm not honestly sure what that means. Would you mind elaborating?
a) Is it really such a big deal that I should wait on it? Will it make that much of a difference?
b) Would it be reasonable to shop around for (or at least look at) the other parts I'd be putting in the machine, or should I let the specs of the new processor dictate my other purchases?
c) Wouldn't the new hardware be more expensive and all that jazz? Would I need to raise my budget cap?
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July 15, 2013 11:47:21 AM

commasplice said:
sna said:


Wait till September. ivybridge-e CPU are coming in sept.


I'm not honestly sure what that means. Would you mind elaborating?
a) Is it really such a big deal that I should wait on it? Will it make that much of a difference?
b) Would it be reasonable to shop around for (or at least look at) the other parts I'd be putting in the machine, or should I let the specs of the new processor dictate my other purchases?
c) Wouldn't the new hardware be more expensive and all that jazz? Would I need to raise my budget cap?


you said you are buying in August/September , so it is better to wait.

the ivybridge-e will come in 4,6,8,10,12 cores ... and things will change alot I guess..

you can still buy Haswell in Sept as well .

here are some hints to keep in mind.

1-get at least i5 4670k
2-16 G of RAM
3-Samsung 840 PRO SSD . (must be pro)
4-GTX 770 or GTX 760.
5- IPS LCD Monitor . never get a non IPS monitor.

keep this in mind till September :) 
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July 15, 2013 11:48:56 AM

jinayhvora said:
no offence, but Haswell and Ivy Bridge-E belong to completely different categories so Ivy-Bridge-E shouldn't make Haswell cheaper
also I really would like to see such a build


When Ivy_e Appear in 4/6/8/10/12 cores .. people will never look at 4 cores again ...

and I only said to him wait coz he told he want to buy in August/Sept.


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July 15, 2013 11:52:37 AM

jinayhvora said:
here's my suggestion http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1gVMt

Thanks, man!
opponentmule2 said:
Need a bigger budget to get a good gaming machine bro.

How much bigger? $200? $500? Also, how do you define "good"? Keep in mind that I'm not the tech wizard youse guise are. My mom determines the quality of a computer based on how much of a hassle it'll be for her to get to Netflix with it. I don't need a PC that can calculate up to the 300,000th digit of Pi. Honestly, it'll probably mostly be used for League of Legends, but I'd like to be able to play more graphics-intensive games at about medium to medium-high without melting a hole in my floor. Is $1000 not a realistic pricepoint for that?
jinayhvora said:
no offence, but Haswell and Ivy Bridge-E belong to completely different categories so Ivy-Bridge-E shouldn't make Haswell cheaper
also I really would like to see such a build

Now, now. No fighting in this thread, please.
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July 15, 2013 11:55:38 AM

sna said:
jinayhvora said:
no offence, but Haswell and Ivy Bridge-E belong to completely different categories so Ivy-Bridge-E shouldn't make Haswell cheaper
also I really would like to see such a build


When Ivy_e Appear in 4/6/8/10/12 cores .. people will never look at 4 cores again ...

and I only said to him wait coz he told he want to buy in August/Sept.



So, about the cores. Does it really matter that much? I have a friend who claims that most software I'd use isn't really written in such a way that it can take full advantage of the additional cores anyway.

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July 15, 2013 12:04:08 PM

jinayhvora said:
no offence, but Haswell and Ivy Bridge-E belong to completely different categories so Ivy-Bridge-E shouldn't make Haswell cheaper
also I really would like to see such a build


here is your $1000 SandyBridge -E build

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/pcpcpc/saved/1XTS

you can get a 50$ less case , I put 100$ case.
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July 15, 2013 12:08:12 PM

commasplice said:
sna said:
jinayhvora said:
no offence, but Haswell and Ivy Bridge-E belong to completely different categories so Ivy-Bridge-E shouldn't make Haswell cheaper
also I really would like to see such a build


When Ivy_e Appear in 4/6/8/10/12 cores .. people will never look at 4 cores again ...

and I only said to him wait coz he told he want to buy in August/Sept.



So, about the cores. Does it really matter that much? I have a friend who claims that most software I'd use isn't really written in such a way that it can take full advantage of the additional cores anyway.



For 3D rendering and Movie Editing , the software takes advantage of Every core the PC can give.

for Games , Playstation 4 and Xbox one are 8 cores machines. All the future games will be optimized for 8 cores.

this is the FUTURE :)  and we are just 3 months away from Playstation 4 :) 

and remeber that the

1- "e" cpu has 40 PCI express 3.0 lanes , while the Haswell Just 16.

2- The "e" Cpu works with Quad channel memory , the Haswell only Dual channel

3- The ivybridge-e will support 1866 DDR3

4- the "e" CPU support upt to 64 G ram non Registered and 256 G of Registered ram. the Haswell only 32 G

the "e" cpu are the real CPU :)  being IvyBridge-E or Sandy Bridge -E


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July 15, 2013 1:07:13 PM

sna said:

For 3D rendering and Movie Editing , the software takes advantage of Every core the PC can give.

for Games , Playstation 4 and Xbox one are 8 cores machines. All the future games will be optimized for 8 cores.

this is the FUTURE :)  and we are just 3 months away from Playstation 4 :) 

and remeber that the

1- "e" cpu has 40 PCI express 3.0 lanes , while the Haswell Just 16.

2- The "e" Cpu works with Quad channel memory , the Haswell only Dual channel

3- The ivybridge-e will support 1866 DDR3

4- the "e" CPU support upt to 64 G ram non Registered and 256 G of Registered ram. the Haswell only 32 G

the "e" cpu are the real CPU :)  being IvyBridge-E or Sandy Bridge -E



Don't forget that I'm still new to this. I get that the numbers for the IvyBridge-E are larger than those for the Haswell, but that's about it. I don't know what PCI express lanes are or how they affect my computer's capabilities. IvyBridge-E supports 1866 DDR3? That's cool, but all I know about DDR3 is that it's something to do with RAM.

Point is this: Is the IvyBridge-E really all that relevant to my needs? I mean, you say that 3D modeling and movie editing takes full advantage of the multiple processors, but I can tell you right now that that is not even kind of on my radar. I don't do any 3D modeling, and I don't edit movies. I don't need the computer that Michael Bay's SFX guys use to overdesign giant robots, ya know?
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July 15, 2013 1:46:05 PM

commasplice said:
sna said:

For 3D rendering and Movie Editing , the software takes advantage of Every core the PC can give.

for Games , Playstation 4 and Xbox one are 8 cores machines. All the future games will be optimized for 8 cores.

this is the FUTURE :)  and we are just 3 months away from Playstation 4 :) 

and remeber that the

1- "e" cpu has 40 PCI express 3.0 lanes , while the Haswell Just 16.

2- The "e" Cpu works with Quad channel memory , the Haswell only Dual channel

3- The ivybridge-e will support 1866 DDR3

4- the "e" CPU support upt to 64 G ram non Registered and 256 G of Registered ram. the Haswell only 32 G

the "e" cpu are the real CPU :)  being IvyBridge-E or Sandy Bridge -E



Don't forget that I'm still new to this. I get that the numbers for the IvyBridge-E are larger than those for the Haswell, but that's about it. I don't know what PCI express lanes are or how they affect my computer's capabilities. IvyBridge-E supports 1866 DDR3? That's cool, but all I know about DDR3 is that it's something to do with RAM.

Point is this: Is the IvyBridge-E really all that relevant to my needs? I mean, you say that 3D modeling and movie editing takes full advantage of the multiple processors, but I can tell you right now that that is not even kind of on my radar. I don't do any 3D modeling, and I don't edit movies. I don't need the computer that Michael Bay's SFX guys use to overdesign giant robots, ya know?


:)  why go that extreme ?

anyways the System is faster , and more cores are better for gaming performance in the future.

and keep in mind , Ivybridge-e in 4 cores will come as well and cheap , and will be faster than today Haswell , given the quad channel memory and the faster DDR3 1866 :) 

you wont be paying alot more ...

anyways it is your choice ,

more PCIe lanes means more cards in SLI in real Native 16X slots ...

the Haswell has 16 lanes means when you have SLI , it will be 8x ,8x and not 16x,16x

40 lanes will give you 16x,16x,8x

OR

16x,8x,8x,8x , or 8x,8x,8x,8x,8x slots ...

any ways , you can still pick Haswell in September :)  so it is your choice
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a b 4 Gaming
July 15, 2013 2:01:27 PM

consoles having 8 cores does not mean games will be optimized for 8 cores
also its not that a game optimized for 8 cores will NOT run on 4
so by all means an i5 is the best thing u can get for gaming now and also after the release of ivy bridge-E
also the Ivy-bridge E CPUs are gonna start at 500$+ so it makes no sense for a $1k system
also about the 1866 RAM, there is not much of a performance difference from 1600
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July 15, 2013 2:09:42 PM

jinayhvora said:
consoles having 8 cores does not mean games will be optimized for 8 cores
also its not that a game optimized for 8 cores will NOT run on 4
so by all means an i5 is the best thing u can get for gaming now and also after the release of ivy bridge-E
also the Ivy-bridge E CPUs are gonna start at 500$+ so it makes no sense for a $1k system
also about the 1866 RAM, there is not much of a performance difference from 1600


lol stop being a child . and stop the stupid arguing ok ?

first , it will be 8 cores optimized , everything is going that route .

and second , you deliberately ignored the Quad channel 1866 DDR , Quad vs dual , just to play arguing games.

and Ivy-e will be also available in 4 cores. and will be better than Haswell and at the same price point for 4 cores.

you said what you had to say . and this conversation has ended.
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a b 4 Gaming
July 15, 2013 11:45:23 PM

yes, u can call me whatever you like, I'm not talking to u anymore, im talking to only the OP and I'm not trying to fight I'm trying to tell him what's right for him
OP, just get an i5 and a GTX 760/770 and get only 8GB of RAM in 2 sticks of 4GB, that's more than enough for gaming, also the SSD isn't really required for gaming, it will give you better loading times but won't actually give u any performance difference in-game


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a b 4 Gaming
July 16, 2013 12:36:04 AM

i like that build, except make the RAM dual channel and remove the CM PSU
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July 16, 2013 1:00:49 AM

jinayhvora said:
i like that build, except make the RAM dual channel and remove the CM PSU


thanks,
i myself is using an 1x8GB thinking of... maybe when i needed to upgrade it, i can just get another 8GB. :p 

and for the PSU, I just picked up something cheap while still having at least a bronze certified... well, reading your previous comment, maybe just drop the ssd and buy a better PSU like SuperFlower or SeaSonic which costs around 100$?
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Best solution

July 16, 2013 1:31:08 AM

jinayhvora said:
i would go for this one its available at a steal price on newegg http://pcpartpicker.com/part/xfx-power-supply-p1750xxxb...


so, I tried inputting your recommended PSU, dropping the SSD... and... this comes out:
http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Firebomber4/saved/1Ydq

Under 1000$ :D 

hope the OP liked it :) 
Share
a b 4 Gaming
July 16, 2013 1:32:57 AM

that's very good, OP i would suggest go with either this or my original build
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July 17, 2013 9:08:41 PM

Thank you all for the help! I will take this all into consideration. I feel like I've learned a lot, haha.
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!