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Amd athlon II x4 760k vs Phenom II x4 965 with HD7770

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July 16, 2013 2:14:23 AM

Hey guys, I'm planning on building a new pc but I don't know what CPU to get. I will only be gaming on it so no editing/recording. I'm stuck between the Phenom II x4 965 or the Athlon II x4 760K OR the intel pentium G2020 because it has more upgrade options.
I have a low budget.
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July 16, 2013 2:24:53 AM

Get a phenom ii 960t or a phenom ii 965 cz phenom is much advance than athlon
Phenom has more l2+l3 cache plus a better core structure
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July 16, 2013 2:27:57 AM

With the 7770, the cheaper 750K should be just fine. Can you tell us your complete budget for the build, so we can pick something that suits your needs. You know.. we guys at TomsHardware are good at these things. :D 
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July 16, 2013 2:45:46 AM

I wouldn't go with the 760k - it's FM2, which isn't a great socket.

Get the 965, with a decent AM3+ motherboard, which will allow you to upgrade to an FX-series in the future :) 
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July 16, 2013 2:47:11 AM

Sangeet Khatri said:
With the 7770, the cheaper 750K should be just fine. Can you tell us your complete budget for the build, so we can pick something that suits your needs. You know.. we guys at TomsHardware are good at these things. :D 


Woah, you guys are quick!
This is my buidl : http://azerty.nl/winkelmandje/winkelmandje/?legen=1&pro...

I already have a HDD and a cd driver.
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July 16, 2013 4:35:28 AM

Quote:
I wouldn't go with the 760k - it's FM2, which isn't a great socket.


What the f.. was that supposed to mean? You do not like the socket? That is so lame. The FM2 motherboard with an Athlon 750K which is a very good CPU for the price that comes very close to the 4300 and can be overclocked, so there is no problem with the socket (if that is what you like to call it). Go for the Athlon 750K anytime.

Quote:
Woah, you guys are quick!
This is my buidl : http://azerty.nl/winkelmandje/winkelmandje/?legen=1&pro...

I already have a HDD and a cd driver.


Yeah, TomsHardware gets crazy fast replies just because everyone wants to answer the question and get selected as the best answer and hence unlock more badges. We do this stuff for fun, because hardware is what we talk about as recreation. Only Hardware geeks would understand. :D 

By the way the only change that you can make to your build for it to make better is :

CPU : Go for the 750K instead of the 760K. The 760K is nothing but an overclocked 750K, but it comes with the same fan as the 750K so the 760K can overheat quite a lot with the stock fan, so you might just need another CPU cooler which would add more costs. So it is better to go with the 750K and then when you have the money just get a nice CPU cooler and overclock the CPU as much as you want. Since they both are just the same thing.

The rest of your build looks just fine to me. With the AMD 7770 graphics card to the Fractal Design Core 1000, your build looks good enough for the price. Go for it, it is a good build. Not any problem from my side. Go for it :) 

If you think that the answer helped, then don't forget to select it as the best answer. It would be highly appreciated by me.
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July 16, 2013 4:43:54 AM

Mark the best answer according to u for closing the post any time
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Best solution

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July 16, 2013 5:22:49 AM

Sn1992 said:
Get a phenom ii 960t or a phenom ii 965 cz phenom is much advance than athlon
Phenom has more l2+l3 cache plus a better core structure


But it also costs more, doesn't it and by the way the 750K should easily handle the 7770 and the 750K would never ever bottleneck that CPU. They offer similar single thread performance and the Athlon is just a bit less in Multi Threaded Performance, so i think going for the 750K should not give problems as the Single Threaded performance is what matters more in games and the Athlon one matched the 965 CPU for much lesser price.

The Athlon 750K is a good CPU for the price. There is no problem in suggesting that CPU.

Also note that the Phenom 965 BE is a 125W CPU, hence it is not very much efficient. Not so important though, but something to keep in mind.

If you think that the answer helped, then don't forget to select it as the best answer. It would be highly appreciated by me.
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July 16, 2013 5:23:12 AM

Sangeet Khatri said:
Quote:
I wouldn't go with the 760k - it's FM2, which isn't a great socket.


What the f.. was that supposed to mean? You do not like the socket? That is so lame. The FM2 motherboard with an Athlon 750K which is a very good CPU for the price that comes very close to the 4300 and can be overclocked, so there is no problem with the socket (if that is what you like to call it). Go for the Athlon 750K anytime.

Quote:
Woah, you guys are quick!
This is my buidl : http://azerty.nl/winkelmandje/winkelmandje/?legen=1&pro...

I already have a HDD and a cd driver.


Yeah, TomsHardware gets crazy fast replies just because everyone wants to answer the question and get selected as the best answer and hence unlock more badges. We do this stuff for fun, because hardware is what we talk about as recreation. Only Hardware geeks would understand. :D 

By the way the only change that you can make to your build for it to make better is :

CPU : Go for the 750K instead of the 760K. The 760K is nothing but an overclocked 750K, but it comes with the same fan as the 750K so the 760K can overheat quite a lot with the stock fan, so you might just need another CPU cooler which would add more costs. So it is better to go with the 750K and then when you have the money just get a nice CPU cooler and overclock the CPU as much as you want. Since they both are just the same thing.

The rest of your build looks just fine to me. With the AMD 7770 graphics card to the Fractal Design Core 1000, your build looks good enough for the price. Go for it, it is a good build. Not any problem from my side. Go for it :) 

If you think that the answer helped, then don't forget to select it as the best answer. It would be highly appreciated by me.


Thanks for your help!
btw, the 750k is 5 euros less than the 760k, so what do you think? I don't mind spending 5 more euros if it is better, and for ocing, ill add a good cpu cooler.
Anyway, thanks for hanging around. :D 
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July 16, 2013 5:31:54 AM

I would personally have got for the 750K because the 760K is nothing but just the 750K but a bit overclocked. And there is no need of buying it. The potential problems could be :

1. Since the CPU is already overclocked, you might need to buy a good CPU cooler eventually for it which might run you about 15 Euros more.

And with the 750K, you do not have to buy a new cooler at the time of buying, because there would not be overheating as it is not overclocked. So you can put a good cooler whenever you plan to overclock. So the 750K is the one i would go for as you can overclock it manually later when you need it.

A 750K for me. :D 
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July 16, 2013 5:34:13 AM

Sangeet Khatri said:
I would personally have got for the 750K because the 760K is nothing but just the 750K but a bit overclocked. And there is no need of buying it. The potential problems could be :

1. Since the CPU is already overclocked, you might need to buy a good CPU cooler eventually for it which might run you about 15 Euros more.

And with the 750K, you do not have to buy a new cooler at the time of buying, because there would not be overheating as it is not overclocked. So you can put a good cooler whenever you plan to overclock. So the 750K is the one i would go for as you can overclock it manually later when you need it.

A 750K for me. :D 


For now, i'll go with the 750K without a cooler then :D 
Thank you very much for helping me out :D 
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July 16, 2013 5:44:45 AM

Yusuf Demirel said:
Sangeet Khatri said:
I would personally have got for the 750K because the 760K is nothing but just the 750K but a bit overclocked. And there is no need of buying it. The potential problems could be :

1. Since the CPU is already overclocked, you might need to buy a good CPU cooler eventually for it which might run you about 15 Euros more.

And with the 750K, you do not have to buy a new cooler at the time of buying, because there would not be overheating as it is not overclocked. So you can put a good cooler whenever you plan to overclock. So the 750K is the one i would go for as you can overclock it manually later when you need it.

A 750K for me. :D 


For now, i'll go with the 750K without a cooler then :D 
Thank you very much for helping me out :D 


Glad to help you :D 
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August 9, 2013 10:28:50 AM

Sangeet Khatri said:
I would personally have got for the 750K because the 760K is nothing but just the 750K but a bit overclocked.


I realize this thread is a bit aged, but I stumbled on it doing research on the 750k vs. 760k.

The 760k is not just an overclocked 750k. 760k is a Richland based CPU, where 750k is Trinity. While there are not many differences, there are a few, most notably:

1. Native support for 2133Mhz Ram for Richland vs 1866 for Trinity
2. Improved, more efficient turbo boost algorithms, theoretically allowing Richland to spend more time at its turbo-boost speed, which also probably allows for the higher clock-speed at the same TDP.
3. A few additional features, mostly having to do with home media viewing & streaming, that AMD has incorporated into Richland. It's not clear whether these features are supported by the Athlon CPU-only chips or not. Plus, this feature-set will most likely be motherboard dependent.

But 1 & 2 above may be enough to select the 760k over 750k.

References linked below:

http://www.techpowerup.com/185732/amd-athlon-x4-socket-...
http://www.extremetech.com/computing/150451-amds-new-ri...
http://www.overclockers.com/amd-richland-a106800k-apu-r...

So, while there are not major architectural differences between the 750k and 760k, if I were buying today, I would opt for the 760k for latest tech and capabilities that Richland has to offer.

You may still choose to go with the 750k. My only point is that there are some additional differences besides just being an OC'd 750k.

But I also agree that 750k is fine driving the 7770.
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August 10, 2013 1:40:04 PM

vertexx said:
Sangeet Khatri said:
I would personally have got for the 750K because the 760K is nothing but just the 750K but a bit overclocked.


I realize this thread is a bit aged, but I stumbled on it doing research on the 750k vs. 760k.

The 760k is not just an overclocked 750k. 760k is a Richland based CPU, where 750k is Trinity. While there are not many differences, there are a few, most notably:

1. Native support for 2133Mhz Ram for Richland vs 1866 for Trinity
2. Improved, more efficient turbo boost algorithms, theoretically allowing Richland to spend more time at its turbo-boost speed, which also probably allows for the higher clock-speed at the same TDP.
3. A few additional features, mostly having to do with home media viewing & streaming, that AMD has incorporated into Richland. It's not clear whether these features are supported by the Athlon CPU-only chips or not. Plus, this feature-set will most likely be motherboard dependent.

But 1 & 2 above may be enough to select the 760k over 750k.

References linked below:

http://www.techpowerup.com/185732/amd-athlon-x4-socket-...
http://www.extremetech.com/computing/150451-amds-new-ri...
http://www.overclockers.com/amd-richland-a106800k-apu-r...

So, while there are not major architectural differences between the 750k and 760k, if I were buying today, I would opt for the 760k for latest tech and capabilities that Richland has to offer.

You may still choose to go with the 750k. My only point is that there are some additional differences besides just being an OC'd 750k.

But I also agree that 750k is fine driving the 7770.


Well, thanks for the information :) 
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August 10, 2013 1:46:11 PM

If you look at gaming benchmarks, even a Intel I3 cpu stomps the best and fastest AMD on the market. Overclocking is mostly a joke, especially on weak cpus.
I, myself, went for the Intel I5 haswell, well beyond 20-30 fps vs the best amd in some games. Always best to look at all the benchmark of various games (hopefully some you want to play), to get a much better idea what cpu (and video card) would be best for you.
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August 10, 2013 2:31:13 PM

computertech82 said:
If you look at gaming benchmarks, even a Intel I3 cpu stomps the best and fastest AMD on the market. Overclocking is mostly a joke, especially on weak cpus.
I, myself, went for the Intel I5 haswell, well beyond 20-30 fps vs the best amd in some games. Always best to look at all the benchmark of various games (hopefully some you want to play), to get a much better idea what cpu (and video card) would be best for you.


Man, I don't know about an i3, it's dual core, but I see a lot of videos that run games great. For example bf3 runs awesome with a gtx 660 on multiplayer. People say that you need a quad core for bf3 multiplayer. I'm very confused :pt1cable:  Tbh,I still don't know what cpu to get. Do you have any recommendations?
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August 11, 2013 8:32:34 AM

Yusuf Demirel said:
computertech82 said:
If you look at gaming benchmarks, even a Intel I3 cpu stomps the best and fastest AMD on the market. Overclocking is mostly a joke, especially on weak cpus.
I, myself, went for the Intel I5 haswell, well beyond 20-30 fps vs the best amd in some games. Always best to look at all the benchmark of various games (hopefully some you want to play), to get a much better idea what cpu (and video card) would be best for you.


Man, I don't know about an i3, it's dual core, but I see a lot of videos that run games great. For example bf3 runs awesome with a gtx 660 on multiplayer. People say that you need a quad core for bf3 multiplayer. I'm very confused :pt1cable:  Tbh,I still don't know what cpu to get. Do you have any recommendations?


Truth is they will give you similar performance in games. I3 is "dual-core", but with hyperthreading enabled, it actually has 4 threads, and in many applications, behaves close to a quad-core processor. AMD's newer CPUs (750k) say "Quad-core", but they're really not quite 4 full cores, so in many applications, they perform somewhat like dual cores. The Phenom II CPU is a full quad-core chip, but it's older tech (coming up on 2 generations old). Confusing, yes.

Bottom line is get the one that fits your budget. One of my builds has an I3/GTX 660 in an HTPC/gaming rig. That works great because it's small form factor, it runs cool and quiet, and I don't have to touch it. I have another build with a Phenom II X4 965/AMD 7850. That build is much more hands-on. I overclock both the CPU/GPU, tweak the cooling arrangement, etc. It's a good build to tinker with. Both run games essentially the same. Some are faster on the I3/660. Some are faster on the OC'd 965/7850. Both are very responsive systems for everyday use. In the end, it's a wash.

I don't have direct experience with the 750K, but it looks very promising as a budget gaming CPU, especially for Small Form Factor systems, since FM2 is the only AMD socket available in Mini-ITX. Tom's is supposed to have a thorough review forthcoming on this CPU. So, it may be good to wait for that.

I hope that gives you a decent perspective on the options. Don't sweat it too much - you'll end up with a good rig regardless.
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August 11, 2013 1:11:47 PM

Sangeet Khatri said:

What the f.. was that supposed to mean? You do not like the socket? That is so lame.


No, because there is no upgrade path, except for APUs, which are nowhere near as good as the FX series for gaming.

Surely you should've realised that...
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August 12, 2013 2:53:40 AM

vertexx said:
Yusuf Demirel said:
computertech82 said:
If you look at gaming benchmarks, even a Intel I3 cpu stomps the best and fastest AMD on the market. Overclocking is mostly a joke, especially on weak cpus.
I, myself, went for the Intel I5 haswell, well beyond 20-30 fps vs the best amd in some games. Always best to look at all the benchmark of various games (hopefully some you want to play), to get a much better idea what cpu (and video card) would be best for you.


Man, I don't know about an i3, it's dual core, but I see a lot of videos that run games great. For example bf3 runs awesome with a gtx 660 on multiplayer. People say that you need a quad core for bf3 multiplayer. I'm very confused :pt1cable:  Tbh,I still don't know what cpu to get. Do you have any recommendations?


Truth is they will give you similar performance in games. I3 is "dual-core", but with hyperthreading enabled, it actually has 4 threads, and in many applications, behaves close to a quad-core processor. AMD's newer CPUs (750k) say "Quad-core", but they're really not quite 4 full cores, so in many applications, they perform somewhat like dual cores. The Phenom II CPU is a full quad-core chip, but it's older tech (coming up on 2 generations old). Confusing, yes.

Bottom line is get the one that fits your budget. One of my builds has an I3/GTX 660 in an HTPC/gaming rig. That works great because it's small form factor, it runs cool and quiet, and I don't have to touch it. I have another build with a Phenom II X4 965/AMD 7850. That build is much more hands-on. I overclock both the CPU/GPU, tweak the cooling arrangement, etc. It's a good build to tinker with. Both run games essentially the same. Some are faster on the I3/660. Some are faster on the OC'd 965/7850. Both are very responsive systems for everyday use. In the end, it's a wash.

I don't have direct experience with the 750K, but it looks very promising as a budget gaming CPU, especially for Small Form Factor systems, since FM2 is the only AMD socket available in Mini-ITX. Tom's is supposed to have a thorough review forthcoming on this CPU. So, it may be good to wait for that.

I hope that gives you a decent perspective on the options. Don't sweat it too much - you'll end up with a good rig regardless.


I guess I'll go with the I3, because I have no idea how to overclock and I don't want to. I'm scared that I will break things :(  Thank you very much for all this information :D  Really appreciated
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August 12, 2013 5:21:54 AM

Here is a standard budget build with an I3, with parts selected based on current deals/discounts. With the I3, there is no need for an aftermarket cooler - stock works just fine. Your next step up would be the I5 3350P for about $50 more.

The motherboard is an Asus H77 uATX. H77 because it gives you a nice quality feature set that's not quite enthusiast level. Z77 would be a step up, but I'd really only recommend that for a higher end build. You could also go full ATX to allow for a little more expansion, but the uATX boards still give you some expansion at a lower cost.

PSU, you could easily go down to a good quality 400-450W PSU for this build, but this 500W Corsair is at a good price right now. Keep an eye out for the Corsair CX430 or 430M (M being Modular) - they've been on special for as low as $30. Don't get the cheaper Cooler Master PSU.

The case is very subjective. I picked the lowest cost ATX Mid-Tower, with a side window and front panel USB 3.0 available. You could pick any case you like, but just be aware that some of the most heavily discounted cases don't have USB 3.0, which is the latest gen of USB.

With graphics the HD7870 Ghz will play almost all games at 1080p on ultra/high, with some of the newer or more intense titles slightly off that. You could also go with GTX 660 for about the same price & performance. You can take a look at the games you play, and google reviews of these cards to see which ones play the games you play faster.

Finally, I recommend Windows 8 at this point. Microsoft will eventually only release new updates to DirectX to Windows 8. Plus the Windows 8 OEM license allows you to transfer the OS from one PC to the next. Windows 7, legally, can only be installed on one PC, period.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($118.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P8H77-M LE Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($74.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: Patriot Signature 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Raidmax Atlas ATX-295WB ATX Mid Tower Case ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 500W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($88.90 @ Amazon)
Total: $645.81
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-12 08:17 EDT-0400)

EDIT: Going over previous posts - looks like you're buying in the Netherlands? The above are US prices, so you're prices will probably vary.
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August 12, 2013 2:59:20 PM

vertexx said:
Here is a standard budget build with an I3, with parts selected based on current deals/discounts. With the I3, there is no need for an aftermarket cooler - stock works just fine. Your next step up would be the I5 3350P for about $50 more.

The motherboard is an Asus H77 uATX. H77 because it gives you a nice quality feature set that's not quite enthusiast level. Z77 would be a step up, but I'd really only recommend that for a higher end build. You could also go full ATX to allow for a little more expansion, but the uATX boards still give you some expansion at a lower cost.

PSU, you could easily go down to a good quality 400-450W PSU for this build, but this 500W Corsair is at a good price right now. Keep an eye out for the Corsair CX430 or 430M (M being Modular) - they've been on special for as low as $30. Don't get the cheaper Cooler Master PSU.

The case is very subjective. I picked the lowest cost ATX Mid-Tower, with a side window and front panel USB 3.0 available. You could pick any case you like, but just be aware that some of the most heavily discounted cases don't have USB 3.0, which is the latest gen of USB.

With graphics the HD7870 Ghz will play almost all games at 1080p on ultra/high, with some of the newer or more intense titles slightly off that. You could also go with GTX 660 for about the same price & performance. You can take a look at the games you play, and google reviews of these cards to see which ones play the games you play faster.

Finally, I recommend Windows 8 at this point. Microsoft will eventually only release new updates to DirectX to Windows 8. Plus the Windows 8 OEM license allows you to transfer the OS from one PC to the next. Windows 7, legally, can only be installed on one PC, period.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($118.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P8H77-M LE Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($74.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: Patriot Signature 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Raidmax Atlas ATX-295WB ATX Mid Tower Case ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 500W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($88.90 @ Amazon)
Total: $645.81
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-12 08:17 EDT-0400)

EDIT: Going over previous posts - looks like you're buying in the Netherlands? The above are US prices, so you're prices will probably vary.


Thanks for this, I really like it how people help eachother

I'm shopping from afuture.nl I live in Belgium, but the prices here are very high, and the shipping costs me only €10 for everything.I already have a hdd. And as for the ram, prices are bit high, wouldn't 4gb be enough? For the GPU, I've found a XFX HD7870 Double Dissipation Edition for only €6 euros more than the MSI GTX 660 Twin Frozr III OC. Do you know anything about that card? I've never seen a Double Dissipation Edition before so I have no idea what it is. This is my current build so far: http://nl.hardware.info/wensenlijst/producten/162984-14...

Thank you for helping me out :) 
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September 3, 2013 7:36:41 AM

Sorry to wake this thread up again, but I tripped over this while searching for info on the Athlon x4 760k.

These forums can be really great, but they can also be the cause of great frustration. lol.

In terms of gaming, specifically, you do not NEED an expensive CPU. The money is much better spent on the GPU.

Just to clear a few things up:
-The i3-3220 is not hyper-threaded, it is a pure dual-core.
-The 750/760k's are 4-core CPU's. I don't get why people claim it isn't a true 4-core. Just because the architecture is different, doesn't mean it doesn't have 4 cores. It does. Also the lack of L3 cache makes very little difference, so don't worry about that.
-As someone else mentioned, the Richland CPU's do include some enhancements over the Trinity series. IMO it's worth $5-10 more for the 760k over the 750k, even just for the higher base clock speeds.
-The Richland CPU's (the actual CPU part, excluding the IGPU), while not boasting "strong" cores, like the i5's, they are not necessarily "weak" either. They could be best described as decent mid-range CPU's in terms of performance, but then it's all relative depending on what specifically you're running on it.

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September 3, 2013 8:02:20 AM

MEC-777 said:
Sorry to wake this thread up again, but I tripped over this while searching for info on the Athlon x4 760k.

These forums can be really great, but they can also be the cause of great frustration. lol.

In terms of gaming, specifically, you do not NEED an expensive CPU. The money is much better spent on the GPU.

Just to clear a few things up:
-The i3-3220 is not hyper-threaded, it is a pure dual-core.
-The 750/760k's are 4-core CPU's. I don't get why people claim it isn't a true 4-core. Just because the architecture is different, doesn't mean it doesn't have 4 cores. It does. Also the lack of L3 cache makes very little difference, so don't worry about that.
-As someone else mentioned, the Richland CPU's do include some enhancements over the Trinity series. IMO it's worth $5-10 more for the 760k over the 750k, even just for the higher base clock speeds.
-The Richland CPU's (the actual CPU part, excluding the IGPU), while not boasting "strong" cores, like the i5's, they are not necessarily "weak" either. They could be best described as decent mid-range CPU's in terms of performance, but then it's all relative depending on what specifically you're running on it.



I3-3220 is hyperthreaded: http://ark.intel.com/products/65693/

Bulldozer/Piledriver architecture is not a full 4 core architecture for "4 core" cpus. With this architecture, each "4 core" CPU only has 2 "Modules". Each module has 2 discrete Integer Processing Units but a single Floating Point Processing Unit. Other module resources are also shared. So, a 4-Core 750K is not really 4 discrete cores. It's 2 modules. It's closer to a 4 core CPU than the I3 with Hyperthreading, but it is not 4 discrete cores as in the Phenoms and older Athlons in this article, which is why those CPUs tend to do relatively better in the multi-threaded tests.

There is certainly debate as to whether this architecture constitutes 4 cores or not, but people have a valid point when saying it's not 4 full cores.

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September 3, 2013 8:39:56 AM

vertexx said:
MEC-777 said:
Sorry to wake this thread up again, but I tripped over this while searching for info on the Athlon x4 760k.

These forums can be really great, but they can also be the cause of great frustration. lol.

In terms of gaming, specifically, you do not NEED an expensive CPU. The money is much better spent on the GPU.

Just to clear a few things up:
-The i3-3220 is not hyper-threaded, it is a pure dual-core.
-The 750/760k's are 4-core CPU's. I don't get why people claim it isn't a true 4-core. Just because the architecture is different, doesn't mean it doesn't have 4 cores. It does. Also the lack of L3 cache makes very little difference, so don't worry about that.
-As someone else mentioned, the Richland CPU's do include some enhancements over the Trinity series. IMO it's worth $5-10 more for the 760k over the 750k, even just for the higher base clock speeds.
-The Richland CPU's (the actual CPU part, excluding the IGPU), while not boasting "strong" cores, like the i5's, they are not necessarily "weak" either. They could be best described as decent mid-range CPU's in terms of performance, but then it's all relative depending on what specifically you're running on it.



I3-3220 is hyperthreaded: http://ark.intel.com/products/65693/

Bulldozer/Piledriver architecture is not a full 4 core architecture for "4 core" cpus. With this architecture, each "4 core" CPU only has 2 "Modules". Each module has 2 discrete Integer Processing Units but a single Floating Point Processing Unit. Other module resources are also shared. So, a 4-Core 750K is not really 4 discrete cores. It's 2 modules. It's closer to a 4 core CPU than the I3 with Hyperthreading, but it is not 4 discrete cores as in the Phenoms and older Athlons in this article, which is why those CPUs tend to do relatively better in the multi-threaded tests.

There is certainly debate as to whether this architecture constitutes 4 cores or not, but people have a valid point when saying it's not 4 full cores.



I stand corrected on the 3220 being hyper-threaded. For some reason I've always thought otherwise.

As for number of cores, I suppose it must first be defined what specifically a "core" consists of and go from there. In terms of physical discreet processing units (not including what is shared), I personally would call them 4-core processors. But I agree, it is debatable depending on how you look at it.

Regardless, it is seen by Windows as a 4-core and any applications/games that are optimized for 4 cores will run just fine on the 750/760's. It's an excellent CPU for the money, especially if your primary use is gaming on a budget.
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September 20, 2013 9:44:22 AM

MEC-777 said:
vertexx said:
MEC-777 said:
Sorry to wake this thread up again, but I tripped over this while searching for info on the Athlon x4 760k.

These forums can be really great, but they can also be the cause of great frustration. lol.

In terms of gaming, specifically, you do not NEED an expensive CPU. The money is much better spent on the GPU.

Just to clear a few things up:
-The i3-3220 is not hyper-threaded, it is a pure dual-core.
-The 750/760k's are 4-core CPU's. I don't get why people claim it isn't a true 4-core. Just because the architecture is different, doesn't mean it doesn't have 4 cores. It does. Also the lack of L3 cache makes very little difference, so don't worry about that.
-As someone else mentioned, the Richland CPU's do include some enhancements over the Trinity series. IMO it's worth $5-10 more for the 760k over the 750k, even just for the higher base clock speeds.
-The Richland CPU's (the actual CPU part, excluding the IGPU), while not boasting "strong" cores, like the i5's, they are not necessarily "weak" either. They could be best described as decent mid-range CPU's in terms of performance, but then it's all relative depending on what specifically you're running on it.



I3-3220 is hyperthreaded: http://ark.intel.com/products/65693/

Bulldozer/Piledriver architecture is not a full 4 core architecture for "4 core" cpus. With this architecture, each "4 core" CPU only has 2 "Modules". Each module has 2 discrete Integer Processing Units but a single Floating Point Processing Unit. Other module resources are also shared. So, a 4-Core 750K is not really 4 discrete cores. It's 2 modules. It's closer to a 4 core CPU than the I3 with Hyperthreading, but it is not 4 discrete cores as in the Phenoms and older Athlons in this article, which is why those CPUs tend to do relatively better in the multi-threaded tests.

There is certainly debate as to whether this architecture constitutes 4 cores or not, but people have a valid point when saying it's not 4 full cores.



I stand corrected on the 3220 being hyper-threaded. For some reason I've always thought otherwise.

As for number of cores, I suppose it must first be defined what specifically a "core" consists of and go from there. In terms of physical discreet processing units (not including what is shared), I personally would call them 4-core processors. But I agree, it is debatable depending on how you look at it.

Regardless, it is seen by Windows as a 4-core and any applications/games that are optimized for 4 cores will run just fine on the 750/760's. It's an excellent CPU for the money, especially if your primary use is gaming on a budget.


I just wanted to add that in my research of the FM2 socket processor. They are neither bulldozer/piledriver. Those are the FX processors. FM2 APU's were designed completely differently, with a better layout on the core itself and in benchmark after benchmark provide better memory usage and CPU throttling over their counterpart FX series processors. Due to the fact that they are laid out in a more sensible straight forward manner for moving the data and because they have true cores. I believe on AMD's website or even here on tomshardware they have diagrams of how the cpus are laid out and how the 4 cores are laid out.

I don't mean to bash I3's or I5's.
but if your planning a budget pc. then AMD is the avenue your going to want to go.

CPU: AMD Richland 760k. 89$US
MOBO: MSI A85XA-G65. 109$US.
RAM: AMD Radeon Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600. 84$US
PSU: FSP Group AURUM 92+ Series PT-650M 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS PLATINUM Certified Modular. 119$ (I just want to add a sidenote here, This PSU Is AMAZING!!)
HDD: Seagate Barracuda STBD2000101 2TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5. 99$US

The above is a wonderful Core setup to a budget PC. From there you could make up your own choices as to CPU cooling, or Case.. As for Video card. I've noticed as an AMD guy myself that... When you have an AMD based pc with a good MOBO and AMD cpu that they work very well with AMD based gpus. they natively connect to each other through catalyst drivers and you can have lots of control and visiability through that program as to what they are actually doing. the temps they are operating. fan speed controls all sorts of things.

I've also found that when using AMD cpus with Nvidia gpu's you lose some of these abilties.
Which leads me to my suggestion for a video card.

MSI R7850 Twin Frozr 2GD5/OC Radeon HD 7850 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16. 189$US
Some would suggest a bigger video card? If that is what the OP wants then go for it.
But if you stepped up to the 7900 series 7950's or 7990's are going to costa ya well over 250$ to 385$

a 7850 is a reliable, budget card that still will play most everything on the market at maxed out settings. Especially when backed up with 8-16GB's or 1600 DDR3 and a good AMD Quad core.

Total price tag on that PC without cooler or case is :: 694$
figure another 100 for Case and cooler and your looking at 800$
for a computer that will rock any game you throw at it. Full Eyefinity 3 monitor setup if you wanted it. and wont hicup or bat an eyelash.

To do this with some intel based nvidia machines you will be well over the 1200$ mark.
because i've found that people with intel try to go the cheap way out by not getting a premium MOBO and it bottlenecks their cpu. so all this talk about spending 300$ on a cpu. well if your not gonna spend 300$ for the matching quality of MOBO then your argument is mute. You would easily have 500 to 700$US wrapped up in just CPU/MOBO for a I5 or I7 based system. because there is no I3 that will out perform the above components.
no way no how..
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a b À AMD
a b à CPUs
September 20, 2013 11:04:58 AM

Ranger1930 said:
MEC-777 said:
vertexx said:
MEC-777 said:
Sorry to wake this thread up again, but I tripped over this while searching for info on the Athlon x4 760k.

These forums can be really great, but they can also be the cause of great frustration. lol.

In terms of gaming, specifically, you do not NEED an expensive CPU. The money is much better spent on the GPU.

Just to clear a few things up:
-The i3-3220 is not hyper-threaded, it is a pure dual-core.
-The 750/760k's are 4-core CPU's. I don't get why people claim it isn't a true 4-core. Just because the architecture is different, doesn't mean it doesn't have 4 cores. It does. Also the lack of L3 cache makes very little difference, so don't worry about that.
-As someone else mentioned, the Richland CPU's do include some enhancements over the Trinity series. IMO it's worth $5-10 more for the 760k over the 750k, even just for the higher base clock speeds.
-The Richland CPU's (the actual CPU part, excluding the IGPU), while not boasting "strong" cores, like the i5's, they are not necessarily "weak" either. They could be best described as decent mid-range CPU's in terms of performance, but then it's all relative depending on what specifically you're running on it.



I3-3220 is hyperthreaded: http://ark.intel.com/products/65693/

Bulldozer/Piledriver architecture is not a full 4 core architecture for "4 core" cpus. With this architecture, each "4 core" CPU only has 2 "Modules". Each module has 2 discrete Integer Processing Units but a single Floating Point Processing Unit. Other module resources are also shared. So, a 4-Core 750K is not really 4 discrete cores. It's 2 modules. It's closer to a 4 core CPU than the I3 with Hyperthreading, but it is not 4 discrete cores as in the Phenoms and older Athlons in this article, which is why those CPUs tend to do relatively better in the multi-threaded tests.

There is certainly debate as to whether this architecture constitutes 4 cores or not, but people have a valid point when saying it's not 4 full cores.



I stand corrected on the 3220 being hyper-threaded. For some reason I've always thought otherwise.

As for number of cores, I suppose it must first be defined what specifically a "core" consists of and go from there. In terms of physical discreet processing units (not including what is shared), I personally would call them 4-core processors. But I agree, it is debatable depending on how you look at it.

Regardless, it is seen by Windows as a 4-core and any applications/games that are optimized for 4 cores will run just fine on the 750/760's. It's an excellent CPU for the money, especially if your primary use is gaming on a budget.


I just wanted to add that in my research of the FM2 socket processor. They are neither bulldozer/piledriver. Those are the FX processors. FM2 APU's were designed completely differently, with a better layout on the core itself and in benchmark after benchmark provide better memory usage and CPU throttling over their counterpart FX series processors. Due to the fact that they are laid out in a more sensible straight forward manner for moving the data and because they have true cores. I believe on AMD's website or even here on tomshardware they have diagrams of how the cpus are laid out and how the 4 cores are laid out.

I don't mean to bash I3's or I5's.
but if your planning a budget pc. then AMD is the avenue your going to want to go.

CPU: AMD Richland 760k. 89$US
MOBO: MSI A85XA-G65. 109$US.
RAM: AMD Radeon Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600. 84$US
PSU: FSP Group AURUM 92+ Series PT-650M 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS PLATINUM Certified Modular. 119$ (I just want to add a sidenote here, This PSU Is AMAZING!!)
HDD: Seagate Barracuda STBD2000101 2TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5. 99$US

The above is a wonderful Core setup to a budget PC. From there you could make up your own choices as to CPU cooling, or Case.. As for Video card. I've noticed as an AMD guy myself that... When you have an AMD based pc with a good MOBO and AMD cpu that they work very well with AMD based gpus. they natively connect to each other through catalyst drivers and you can have lots of control and visiability through that program as to what they are actually doing. the temps they are operating. fan speed controls all sorts of things.

I've also found that when using AMD cpus with Nvidia gpu's you lose some of these abilties.
Which leads me to my suggestion for a video card.

MSI R7850 Twin Frozr 2GD5/OC Radeon HD 7850 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16. 189$US
Some would suggest a bigger video card? If that is what the OP wants then go for it.
But if you stepped up to the 7900 series 7950's or 7990's are going to costa ya well over 250$ to 385$

a 7850 is a reliable, budget card that still will play most everything on the market at maxed out settings. Especially when backed up with 8-16GB's or 1600 DDR3 and a good AMD Quad core.

Total price tag on that PC without cooler or case is :: 694$
figure another 100 for Case and cooler and your looking at 800$
for a computer that will rock any game you throw at it. Full Eyefinity 3 monitor setup if you wanted it. and wont hicup or bat an eyelash.

To do this with some intel based nvidia machines you will be well over the 1200$ mark.
because i've found that people with intel try to go the cheap way out by not getting a premium MOBO and it bottlenecks their cpu. so all this talk about spending 300$ on a cpu. well if your not gonna spend 300$ for the matching quality of MOBO then your argument is mute. You would easily have 500 to 700$US wrapped up in just CPU/MOBO for a I5 or I7 based system. because there is no I3 that will out perform the above components.
no way no how..


Half of the things you do not know what you are talking about. For 800 dollars I can build a beast with Intel i5 and 7970 which would kill this silly build that you suggested off to pieces.

Really the build you suggested is extremely bad in terms of price/performance.

So, were the most of the things that you said. You seriously are suggesting things that are just not true.

I think you should correct your facts before posting anything without a reason.

Really, your knowledge is quite incomplete and is you should get your facts right.
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September 20, 2013 12:09:54 PM

Sangeet Khatri said:
Ranger1930 said:
MEC-777 said:
vertexx said:
MEC-777 said:
Sorry to wake this thread up again, but I tripped over this while searching for info on the Athlon x4 760k.

These forums can be really great, but they can also be the cause of great frustration. lol.

In terms of gaming, specifically, you do not NEED an expensive CPU. The money is much better spent on the GPU.

Just to clear a few things up:
-The i3-3220 is not hyper-threaded, it is a pure dual-core.
-The 750/760k's are 4-core CPU's. I don't get why people claim it isn't a true 4-core. Just because the architecture is different, doesn't mean it doesn't have 4 cores. It does. Also the lack of L3 cache makes very little difference, so don't worry about that.
-As someone else mentioned, the Richland CPU's do include some enhancements over the Trinity series. IMO it's worth $5-10 more for the 760k over the 750k, even just for the higher base clock speeds.
-The Richland CPU's (the actual CPU part, excluding the IGPU), while not boasting "strong" cores, like the i5's, they are not necessarily "weak" either. They could be best described as decent mid-range CPU's in terms of performance, but then it's all relative depending on what specifically you're running on it.



I3-3220 is hyperthreaded: http://ark.intel.com/products/65693/

Bulldozer/Piledriver architecture is not a full 4 core architecture for "4 core" cpus. With this architecture, each "4 core" CPU only has 2 "Modules". Each module has 2 discrete Integer Processing Units but a single Floating Point Processing Unit. Other module resources are also shared. So, a 4-Core 750K is not really 4 discrete cores. It's 2 modules. It's closer to a 4 core CPU than the I3 with Hyperthreading, but it is not 4 discrete cores as in the Phenoms and older Athlons in this article, which is why those CPUs tend to do relatively better in the multi-threaded tests.

There is certainly debate as to whether this architecture constitutes 4 cores or not, but people have a valid point when saying it's not 4 full cores.



I stand corrected on the 3220 being hyper-threaded. For some reason I've always thought otherwise.

As for number of cores, I suppose it must first be defined what specifically a "core" consists of and go from there. In terms of physical discreet processing units (not including what is shared), I personally would call them 4-core processors. But I agree, it is debatable depending on how you look at it.

Regardless, it is seen by Windows as a 4-core and any applications/games that are optimized for 4 cores will run just fine on the 750/760's. It's an excellent CPU for the money, especially if your primary use is gaming on a budget.


I just wanted to add that in my research of the FM2 socket processor. They are neither bulldozer/piledriver. Those are the FX processors. FM2 APU's were designed completely differently, with a better layout on the core itself and in benchmark after benchmark provide better memory usage and CPU throttling over their counterpart FX series processors. Due to the fact that they are laid out in a more sensible straight forward manner for moving the data and because they have true cores. I believe on AMD's website or even here on tomshardware they have diagrams of how the cpus are laid out and how the 4 cores are laid out.

I don't mean to bash I3's or I5's.
but if your planning a budget pc. then AMD is the avenue your going to want to go.

CPU: AMD Richland 760k. 89$US
MOBO: MSI A85XA-G65. 109$US.
RAM: AMD Radeon Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600. 84$US
PSU: FSP Group AURUM 92+ Series PT-650M 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS PLATINUM Certified Modular. 119$ (I just want to add a sidenote here, This PSU Is AMAZING!!)
HDD: Seagate Barracuda STBD2000101 2TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5. 99$US

The above is a wonderful Core setup to a budget PC. From there you could make up your own choices as to CPU cooling, or Case.. As for Video card. I've noticed as an AMD guy myself that... When you have an AMD based pc with a good MOBO and AMD cpu that they work very well with AMD based gpus. they natively connect to each other through catalyst drivers and you can have lots of control and visiability through that program as to what they are actually doing. the temps they are operating. fan speed controls all sorts of things.

I've also found that when using AMD cpus with Nvidia gpu's you lose some of these abilties.
Which leads me to my suggestion for a video card.

MSI R7850 Twin Frozr 2GD5/OC Radeon HD 7850 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16. 189$US
Some would suggest a bigger video card? If that is what the OP wants then go for it.
But if you stepped up to the 7900 series 7950's or 7990's are going to costa ya well over 250$ to 385$

a 7850 is a reliable, budget card that still will play most everything on the market at maxed out settings. Especially when backed up with 8-16GB's or 1600 DDR3 and a good AMD Quad core.

Total price tag on that PC without cooler or case is :: 694$
figure another 100 for Case and cooler and your looking at 800$
for a computer that will rock any game you throw at it. Full Eyefinity 3 monitor setup if you wanted it. and wont hicup or bat an eyelash.

To do this with some intel based nvidia machines you will be well over the 1200$ mark.
because i've found that people with intel try to go the cheap way out by not getting a premium MOBO and it bottlenecks their cpu. so all this talk about spending 300$ on a cpu. well if your not gonna spend 300$ for the matching quality of MOBO then your argument is mute. You would easily have 500 to 700$US wrapped up in just CPU/MOBO for a I5 or I7 based system. because there is no I3 that will out perform the above components.
no way no how..


Half of the things you do not know what you are talking about. For 800 dollars I can build a beast with Intel i5 and 7970 which would kill this silly build that you suggested off to pieces.

Really the build you suggested is extremely bad in terms of price/performance.

So, were the most of the things that you said. You seriously are suggesting things that are just not true.

I think you should correct your facts before posting anything without a reason.

Really, your knowledge is quite incomplete and is you should get your facts right.


Close this topic :D  I have recently build my first pc with an I3 3220, MSI Twin Frozr III GTX 660. I love it :D  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YU_01PZbWeE
Watch this. This build is awesome for 1600x900p resolution ;)  Runs very cool too.
PS: Only costed me €496 with shipping without a HDD.
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November 3, 2013 9:30:34 AM

Sangeet Khatri said:
I would personally have got for the 750K because the 760K is nothing but just the 750K but a bit overclocked. And there is no need of buying it. The potential problems could be :

1. Since the CPU is already overclocked, you might need to buy a good CPU cooler eventually for it which might run you about 15 Euros more.

And with the 750K, you do not have to buy a new cooler at the time of buying, because there would not be overheating as it is not overclocked. So you can put a good cooler whenever you plan to overclock. So the 750K is the one i would go for as you can overclock it manually later when you need it.

A 750K for me. :D 


I just want to say that the 760k is based off richland cores while the 750k is based off trinity. The 760k is definitely worth it over the 750k.
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a b à CPUs
November 3, 2013 11:09:22 PM

But as you can see the performance difference is not that much. The 760K is still based on the same Piledriver architecture. Just launched within a new series of CPU that is Richland vs the Trinity.

So, the only difference within all the specs are just basically the clock speeds. You can see the whole information from here at http://www.cpu-world.com/Compare/880/AMD_Athlon_X4_750K...

And yeah, the Richland are just Trinity CPU's with a few 100mhz clock speed increase.

So, you can achieve exactly similar results by just overclocking it yourself if you ever feel like.
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November 4, 2013 6:09:29 AM

In my research I've seen the 760k at the same price or even less (when on sale) than the 750k. It only makes sense to buy the best components for your money. If you can get the 760 for the same price as the 750, go for it. ;) 
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November 4, 2013 7:47:25 AM

Of course.. Yeah definitely, if the 760k and 750k are of same price, then it is always better to get the 760k. But if the prices are different, then the 760k is not worth the extra price.

I mean the prices are not always the same in every country.
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November 4, 2013 7:50:27 AM

Sangeet Khatri said:
Of course.. Yeah definitely, if the 760k and 750k are of same price, then it is always better to get the 760k. But if the prices are different, then the 760k is not worth the extra price.

I mean the prices are not always the same in every country.


For sure. Just something to keep in mind.

Also, depending on how much extra the 760 is, it'll boil down to personal preference as to whether it's worth the extra cost. If it's only $5 more, IMO it's still worth it. If it's $20, not so much. lol
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November 26, 2013 12:29:57 PM

Sangeet Khatri said:
Ranger1930 said:
MEC-777 said:
vertexx said:
MEC-777 said:
Sorry to wake this thread up again, but I tripped over this while searching for info on the Athlon x4 760k.

These forums can be really great, but they can also be the cause of great frustration. lol.

In terms of gaming, specifically, you do not NEED an expensive CPU. The money is much better spent on the GPU.

Just to clear a few things up:
-The i3-3220 is not hyper-threaded, it is a pure dual-core.
-The 750/760k's are 4-core CPU's. I don't get why people claim it isn't a true 4-core. Just because the architecture is different, doesn't mean it doesn't have 4 cores. It does. Also the lack of L3 cache makes very little difference, so don't worry about that.
-As someone else mentioned, the Richland CPU's do include some enhancements over the Trinity series. IMO it's worth $5-10 more for the 760k over the 750k, even just for the higher base clock speeds.
-The Richland CPU's (the actual CPU part, excluding the IGPU), while not boasting "strong" cores, like the i5's, they are not necessarily "weak" either. They could be best described as decent mid-range CPU's in terms of performance, but then it's all relative depending on what specifically you're running on it.



I3-3220 is hyperthreaded: http://ark.intel.com/products/65693/

Bulldozer/Piledriver architecture is not a full 4 core architecture for "4 core" cpus. With this architecture, each "4 core" CPU only has 2 "Modules". Each module has 2 discrete Integer Processing Units but a single Floating Point Processing Unit. Other module resources are also shared. So, a 4-Core 750K is not really 4 discrete cores. It's 2 modules. It's closer to a 4 core CPU than the I3 with Hyperthreading, but it is not 4 discrete cores as in the Phenoms and older Athlons in this article, which is why those CPUs tend to do relatively better in the multi-threaded tests.

There is certainly debate as to whether this architecture constitutes 4 cores or not, but people have a valid point when saying it's not 4 full cores.



I stand corrected on the 3220 being hyper-threaded. For some reason I've always thought otherwise.

As for number of cores, I suppose it must first be defined what specifically a "core" consists of and go from there. In terms of physical discreet processing units (not including what is shared), I personally would call them 4-core processors. But I agree, it is debatable depending on how you look at it.

Regardless, it is seen by Windows as a 4-core and any applications/games that are optimized for 4 cores will run just fine on the 750/760's. It's an excellent CPU for the money, especially if your primary use is gaming on a budget.


I just wanted to add that in my research of the FM2 socket processor. They are neither bulldozer/piledriver. Those are the FX processors. FM2 APU's were designed completely differently, with a better layout on the core itself and in benchmark after benchmark provide better memory usage and CPU throttling over their counterpart FX series processors. Due to the fact that they are laid out in a more sensible straight forward manner for moving the data and because they have true cores. I believe on AMD's website or even here on tomshardware they have diagrams of how the cpus are laid out and how the 4 cores are laid out.

I don't mean to bash I3's or I5's.
but if your planning a budget pc. then AMD is the avenue your going to want to go.

CPU: AMD Richland 760k. 89$US
MOBO: MSI A85XA-G65. 109$US.
RAM: AMD Radeon Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600. 84$US
PSU: FSP Group AURUM 92+ Series PT-650M 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS PLATINUM Certified Modular. 119$ (I just want to add a sidenote here, This PSU Is AMAZING!!)
HDD: Seagate Barracuda STBD2000101 2TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5. 99$US

The above is a wonderful Core setup to a budget PC. From there you could make up your own choices as to CPU cooling, or Case.. As for Video card. I've noticed as an AMD guy myself that... When you have an AMD based pc with a good MOBO and AMD cpu that they work very well with AMD based gpus. they natively connect to each other through catalyst drivers and you can have lots of control and visiability through that program as to what they are actually doing. the temps they are operating. fan speed controls all sorts of things.

I've also found that when using AMD cpus with Nvidia gpu's you lose some of these abilties.
Which leads me to my suggestion for a video card.

MSI R7850 Twin Frozr 2GD5/OC Radeon HD 7850 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16. 189$US
Some would suggest a bigger video card? If that is what the OP wants then go for it.
But if you stepped up to the 7900 series 7950's or 7990's are going to costa ya well over 250$ to 385$

a 7850 is a reliable, budget card that still will play most everything on the market at maxed out settings. Especially when backed up with 8-16GB's or 1600 DDR3 and a good AMD Quad core.

Total price tag on that PC without cooler or case is :: 694$
figure another 100 for Case and cooler and your looking at 800$
for a computer that will rock any game you throw at it. Full Eyefinity 3 monitor setup if you wanted it. and wont hicup or bat an eyelash.

To do this with some intel based nvidia machines you will be well over the 1200$ mark.
because i've found that people with intel try to go the cheap way out by not getting a premium MOBO and it bottlenecks their cpu. so all this talk about spending 300$ on a cpu. well if your not gonna spend 300$ for the matching quality of MOBO then your argument is mute. You would easily have 500 to 700$US wrapped up in just CPU/MOBO for a I5 or I7 based system. because there is no I3 that will out perform the above components.
no way no how..


Half of the things you do not know what you are talking about. For 800 dollars I can build a beast with Intel i5 and 7970 which would kill this silly build that you suggested off to pieces.

Really the build you suggested is extremely bad in terms of price/performance.

So, were the most of the things that you said. You seriously are suggesting things that are just not true.

I think you should correct your facts before posting anything without a reason.

Really, your knowledge is quite incomplete and is you should get your facts right.


mentioning getting facts straight where you the one that said the 760K is nothing but a overclocked 750K, which is flat out wrong, might want to get those facts straight before you say them over and over again.
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!