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Which Opperating system for my first build? (please read, buying soon)

Hey guys,


I found this "Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium" on Newegg, and I am wondering how it compares with the "Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64bit (OEM) System Builder DVD 1 Pack" from Amazon

I was planning on installing the OEM version on my first rig, but now I'm wondering if this would be cleaner. I plan on upgrading my individual components as time goes on, and so would this version give me less issues? What exactly would I be gaining?
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  1. Best answer
    The linked Newegg version is the retail license. There is zero difference in the software itself or the functionality. The difference is the license. An OEM license (according to MS) should only be used on one system only. They define a system essentially as the motherboard. While you can change other components in the system as much as you want, if you change the motherboard, they may want you to buy another license. I have heard that they often waive that if your original motherboard died.

    The retail license allows you to have the OS installed on any computer you want, as long as you only have it installed on ONE computer at any given time.

    While the retail license sounds more flexible, it is TWICE as much $$ as the OEM license. You could have two OEM licenses for the cost of one retail. In other words, if you ever change the motherboard, and Windows starts screaming, and MS insists that you get a new license, well then you just buy another OEM license : ) So getting the OEM now saves you $100 and you've lost nothing, in fact in all likelihood you aren't going to have any problems with the OEM license. $199 for the retail license is prohibitive and is not what I would buy or suggest for you. Get the OEM license. Newegg has it too.
  2. larkspur said:
    ...They define a system essentially as the motherboard. While you can change other components in the system as much as you want, if you change the motherboard, they may want you to buy another license...


    Well, what has me worried is what is said in a review over on this thread, which says:
    "This means that it is NO LONGER just tied to the system's motherboard (BIOS) as is still popularly believed, but now to ALL hardware components and their exact configuration (including unique serial numbers where applicable) of the target computer on which all OEM or "System Builder" versions of the Windows Operating System in question that is to be tied to them."
    Is this false, and has anyone here had any trouble upgrading things like ram, drives, CPUs, and GPUs on the OEM version?

    Also, a second question I have is if the whole liscensing thing is a problem, as technically the OEM is not supposed to be for personal use.

    And thirdly, my rig only uses one HDD drive with no SSD (boot up time is not a huge issue for me right now) and so on the off chance that my OS did start screaming, would I lose any data on that drive?
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