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Long lifespan gaming computer

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July 17, 2013 2:46:52 PM

Hello everyone,

I have put together a decent gaming rig at pcpartpicker, I'm just seeking advice to see if I can do anything better.

Approximate Purchase Date: Holiday, 2013

Budget Range: $800 - $1200 all inclusive

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, surfing the web, watching movies, LAN parties

Are you buying a monitor: Yes



Parts to Upgrade: N/A

Do you need to buy OS: Yes


Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Does not matter as long as reputable/reliable.

Location: Rockford Illinois, 61109, United States

Parts Preferences: Intel, Nvidia, MSI, EVGA, ASrock, Asus, Gigabyte, Apevia, Fractal Design, Cooler Master, Corsair, Kingston, Western Digital, Seagate, Crucial, Antec, SeaSonic, basically anything reputable/reliable.

Overclocking: Yes, to avoid upgrading CPU in the future.

SLI or Crossfire: Yes, it will be the only eventual upgrade besides storage space.

Your Monitor Resolution: I would like 1920x1080, but would prefer 1920x1200.

Additional Comments: I am seeking advice for upgrades, corners to cut, ways to possibly get the same quality rig I have already blueprinted for a lower price, and any general feedback that could help me build the best system I can for the money.

Genuinely Important!
What I mean by "long lifespan gaming rig" is that it should be able to play games at 35+ FPS at 5/10, or better, quality settings and high resolutions. The rig should be able to do this for the next 8 years or more and it should not need to be upgraded to accomplish that. I still need to fit a desk and chair into my budget. WIFI is a must! I already have headphones and a 5.1 surround system for it.

Less Significant
SSD, top mounted dual 120/140mm fans, a side panel window that can have a 180+ mm fan installed on it (Whether I have to drill a hole for it, or not, is fine... The side panel window should at least be large enough to accommodate a 180+ mm fan or diameter hole), dual front mounted 120/140mm fans, external 3.5" drive bay for media card reader, front panel USB 3.0, Blu-ray drive, extra fans/which fans?

Not really important
A case that is not aesthetically "finished" so that I can more easily do a custom paint job. Front panel eSATA, front panel hot swap drive bay. A light, easily movable system for LAN parties (I don't go to many, but the bit of time spent carrying a rig to the car and back can be dreadfully frightening with heavy, bulky equipment). Fan speed controller. I don't really care how loud it gets.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: I have a laptop that will undoubtedly fall far behind in gaming performance very soon, so, I need a PC that will last much longer. The laptop will eventually only be used for homework and movies. Basically I need a system that will play games optimally for a decent amount of time without needing to put extra money into it for an equally decent amount of time.

Include a list of any parts you have already selected with descriptively labeled links for parts:

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1fqfS
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1fqfS/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1fqfS/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Zalman CNPS9500 AT Ball Bearing CPU Cooler ($39.98 @ Outlet PC)
Thermal Compound: Antec Formula 7 Nano Diamond 4g Thermal Paste ($11.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87M PRO4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($87.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Wintec One 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.72 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($66.61 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Newegg)
Wireless Network Adapter: Rosewill RNX-N250PCe 802.11b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($19.95 @ Amazon)
Case: Apex PCV-588 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.98 @ Outlet PC)
Power Supply: Cooler Master i700 700W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Samsung S22B300B 60Hz 21.5" Monitor ($169.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Keyboard: V7 CK0A1-4N6P Wired Standard Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($10.40 @ Amazon)
Other: 6ft DVI-D cable ($5.78 @ EBAY)
Other: Desk & chair, ($50 @ Craigslist) <---GUESS!!!
Total: $1159.31
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-17 17:17 EDT-0400)

More about : long lifespan gaming computer

a b V Motherboard
July 17, 2013 3:05:52 PM

Are you set on an Intel CPU and Motherboard?? I only ask because for the money you have, I really believe you will get more performance per dollar on your budget with an AMD gaming rig. I am not against Intel, and I currently have both an Intel and AMD rig. But for your budget, I think you should look at an AMD set up. I just built an AMD set up for another person, and here is the parts list I picked from, and the total cost including shipping:

Antec 902 Case 75.00
ASROCK 970 Extreme 4 $85.00
AMD FX 8350 $180.00
Sapphire 7870 Ghz oc edition 175.00
128 gb Crucial M4 SSD for OS 75.00
1 TB WD Black hd for storage 85.00
Pioneer Blu Ray DVD Rom 40.00
Gigabyte Wireless Network Adapter 35.00
Antec 650 Tru Power PSU 65.00
Windows 7 Professional 99.00
Total 904.00---Leaves you plenty of room for keyboard, mouse, monitor, chair etc..
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a c 111 à CPUs
a c 92 V Motherboard
a b 4 Gaming
a b U Graphics card
a b Î Nvidia
July 17, 2013 3:09:19 PM

By Holiday 2013, if you mean like xmas time, then ask then. Pricing a PC now to build 6 months from now is pointless. New stuff comes out, holiday stuff goes on sale, RAM and HD prices can go up or down by hundreds of percent depending on storms, supply, demand.
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a b 4 Gaming
July 17, 2013 3:12:38 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Phanteks PH-TC12DX 68.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($159.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.13 @ TigerDirect)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($66.61 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Newegg)
Wireless Network Adapter: Asus PCE-N10 802.11b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($19.26 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VS229H-P 21.5" Monitor ($134.02 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: V7 CK0A1-4N6P Wired Standard Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($10.40 @ Amazon)
Total: $1272.33
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-17 18:08 EDT-0400)

Made a few changes but a bit pricer
-PSU, i do not trust Cooler Master PSUs especially for the long run
-CPU cooler, Zalman is good and all but you can get around the same performance for cheaper or spend a bit more for a stronger cooler
-Changed Memory, not a fan of Wintec as they use some crappy heat sinks/plastic parts fall off very easy
-Case, get a more solid and sturdy case like this one, will last a lot longer than you think(may even be able to use it for your next build after this one since the quality is just great)
-Monitor changed to ASUS, samsung is just over charging in a lot of their stuff

If it costs too much, i will revise and try to keep quality intact. Would really like to see an SSD inside here instead though. Also the i5 4670k in microcenter is a in-store buy only
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a c 106 à CPUs
a c 85 V Motherboard
a b 4 Gaming
a b U Graphics card
a b Î Nvidia
July 17, 2013 3:17:08 PM

jarblater said:

Genuinely Important!
What I mean by "long lifespan gaming rig" is that it should be able to play games at 35+ FPS at 5/10, or better, quality settings and high resolutions.

The rig should be able to do this for the next 8 years or more and it should not need to be upgraded to accomplish that.


8 years or more for high quality setting and high resolution..?
well, this is mission impossible for just $800-$1200

i remember the strongest card at 2005, 7800GTX, lauch at $650..
and eight years later (today, 2013), the performance of the strongest card in 2005 is nothing but just like crap to run today games, even for lowest quality.

This card even slower than very low end hd4650..

You need the strongest vga card today and multiplied it by three to face next 5 years game..

jarblater said:

Overclocking: Yes, to avoid upgrading CPU in the future.


don't overclock if you want your system survive for very long time.
usually, overclocked system just running for 3 years before get any trouble..
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July 17, 2013 3:20:54 PM

Suferbus said:
Are you set on an Intel CPU and Motherboard?? I only ask because for the money you have, I really believe you will get more performance per dollar on your budget with an AMD gaming rig. I am not against Intel, and I currently have both an Intel and AMD rig. But for your budget, I think you should look at an AMD set up. I just built an AMD set up for another person, and here is the parts list I picked from, and the total cost including shipping:

Antec 902 Case 75.00
ASROCK 970 Extreme 4 $85.00
AMD FX 8350 $180.00
Sapphire 7870 Ghz oc edition 175.00
128 gb Crucial M4 SSD for OS 75.00
1 TB WD Black hd for storage 85.00
Pioneer Blu Ray DVD Rom 40.00
Gigabyte Wireless Network Adapter 35.00
Antec 650 Tru Power PSU 65.00
Windows 7 Professional 99.00
Total 904.00---Leaves you plenty of room for keyboard, mouse, monitor, chair etc..


I'm not against building an AMD rig, they have given me very decent CPU performance before. Even their ATHLON II x4 brigade can play Planetside 2 at 35 FPS. The only thing that concerns me is that I might have to spend money upgrading to an Intel system or overclock it sooner than I would want to (which could lead to an early death). I really like the idea of having a CPU that runs 8 simultaneous threads because that will be awesome for future games, especially seeing that the new Xbox and PS4 both use 8 CPU cores.

There's definately a lot of plusses here, so I'm going to start looking at what kind of AMD build I can put together, but, I'm going to stick with Nvidia GPU since I don't plan to do any folding.

Do you have anything against the RAM I chose to put in my build? The Wintec One. I have never heard of Wintec One before but the price for the speed, voltage, and latency rating can't be beat unless it's notably unreliable RAM.
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July 17, 2013 3:31:00 PM

Quaddro said:
jarblater said:

Genuinely Important!
What I mean by "long lifespan gaming rig" is that it should be able to play games at 35+ FPS at 5/10, or better, quality settings and high resolutions.

The rig should be able to do this for the next 8 years or more and it should not need to be upgraded to accomplish that.


8 years or more for high quality setting and high resolution..?
well, this is mission impossible for just $800-$1200

i remember the strongest card at 2005, 7800GTX, lauch at $650..
and eight years later (today, 2013), the performance of the strongest card in 2005 is nothing but just like crap to run today games, even for lowest quality.

This card even slower than very low end hd4650..

You need the strongest vga card today and multiplied it by three to face next 5 years game..

jarblater said:

Overclocking: Yes, to avoid upgrading CPU in the future.


don't overclock if you want your system survive for very long time.
usually, overclocked system just running for 3 years before get any trouble..


I had an MSI NX 8800 GT that lasted me up until last year. I was normally getting around 25~30 FPS in games like Star Craft II (lowest settings), which was acceptable for me. That system ran on a Athlon 64 x2 4400+ with 3GB DDR2 800 lol... Unbelievably, I overclocked it from 2.3 to 2.8 on stock cooling, and after turning off "Cool 'n' Quiet" I was getting up to 200 FPS (as low as ~3 if I remember correctly) in Supreme commander: Forged Alliance. If I remember correctly, I did have the GPU overclocked at this point by about 150 MHz core and 300 MHz memory, but don't quote me on that... That was acceptable performance for me, but I have an income now (been holding down my first job for almost half of a year, pretty proud of that) and have played a few games on my friends $4000, dual 7970, 3930k, all water cooled system... That performance is no longer acceptable.

I wouldn't overclock anything but the CPU (never the GPU) until it got to the point that it was bottlenecking my eventual upgrade to SLI in games. That CPU would probably see 4 or 5 years of life before I ever touch the multiplier.
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a c 106 à CPUs
a c 85 V Motherboard
a b 4 Gaming
a b U Graphics card
a b Î Nvidia
July 17, 2013 3:48:53 PM

8800GT lauch in oct 2007 and came as very high end gpu at the time, and custom third party vga card came in 2008, that's mean 5 years ago..:D 

okay, this is my opinion..
CPU Cooler: Coolermaster 212+, cheaper, but much better than Zalman CNPS9500
Thermal Compound: Shinetsu x23-7783, this is very good thermalpaste. one of the best thermal paste on the market.
Memory: 8GB (2x4GB) Corsair Vengeance CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9, lifetime warranty, very easy to rma..
Storage: TOSHIBA DT01ACA100 1tb SATA 3, this toshiba is using same platform as hitachi 1tb sata 3, almost as fast as wdc black but much lower price.
Power Supply: Coolermaster PSU means crapmaster PSU..get the seasonic, corsair, or superflower PSU. for example Seasonic SS-750JS 750 Watts. Excellent PSU at lower price..

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a b V Motherboard
July 17, 2013 4:33:20 PM

jarblater said:
Suferbus said:
Are you set on an Intel CPU and Motherboard?? I only ask because for the money you have, I really believe you will get more performance per dollar on your budget with an AMD gaming rig. I am not against Intel, and I currently have both an Intel and AMD rig. But for your budget, I think you should look at an AMD set up. I just built an AMD set up for another person, and here is the parts list I picked from, and the total cost including shipping:

Antec 902 Case 75.00
ASROCK 970 Extreme 4 $85.00
AMD FX 8350 $180.00
Sapphire 7870 Ghz oc edition 175.00
128 gb Crucial M4 SSD for OS 75.00
1 TB WD Black hd for storage 85.00
Pioneer Blu Ray DVD Rom 40.00
Gigabyte Wireless Network Adapter 35.00
Antec 650 Tru Power PSU 65.00
Windows 7 Professional 99.00
Total 904.00---Leaves you plenty of room for keyboard, mouse, monitor, chair etc..


I'm not against building an AMD rig, they have given me very decent CPU performance before. Even their ATHLON II x4 brigade can play Planetside 2 at 35 FPS. The only thing that concerns me is that I might have to spend money upgrading to an Intel system or overclock it sooner than I would want to (which could lead to an early death). I really like the idea of having a CPU that runs 8 simultaneous threads because that will be awesome for future games, especially seeing that the new Xbox and PS4 both use 8 CPU cores.

There's definately a lot of plusses here, so I'm going to start looking at what kind of AMD build I can put together, but, I'm going to stick with Nvidia GPU since I don't plan to do any folding.

Do you have anything against the RAM I chose to put in my build? The Wintec One. I have never heard of Wintec One before but the price for the speed, voltage, and latency rating can't be beat unless it's notably unreliable RAM.


The AMD CPU I listed in my parts list is an AMD FX 8350 which is AMD's Current Flagship 8 core CPU and competes with the Icore 7. You will have plenty of room for future games if they do indeed call for more cores in the future. Right now, most games do not utilize even close to that.
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Best solution

a b V Motherboard
July 17, 2013 4:35:42 PM

I have used Wintec and it is reliable ram in my experience. But you can find Gskillz on special. I paid 55.00 for my 8gb (2x4gb) g skills ram. But buy what is on sale, and check benchmarks and reviews at the time of purchase. Things change quickly in the pc realm. Knowledge is king!! ~~ Happy Gaming~~Suferbus :) 
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July 17, 2013 10:40:58 PM

boulbox ... awesome good call on the monitor... reputable brand, same resolution, IPS, cheaper price, and wayyyyyyyyy better contrast ratio (50,000,000:1 vs. 1,000:1) ... THANK YOU!!!

I revised my parts list, here's what I changed:

CPU cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212+ ($19.99 @ Newegg) vs. ($39.98 @ Outlet PC) -19.99
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87MX-D3H ($112.50 @ Newegg) vs. ($87.99 @ Micro Center) +24.51
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM ($62.98 @ Outlet PC) vs. ($66.61 @ Outlet PC) -3.63
Power Supply: Fractal Design Integra R2 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V ($68.00 @ Newegg) vs. ($59.99 @ Newegg) +8.01
Optical Drive: Pioneer BDC-207DBK Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($37.98 @ Outlet PC) vs ($15.98 @ Outlet PC) +22
Monitor: Asus VS229H-P 21.5" Monitor ($134.02 @ Amazon) vs. ($169.99 @ Super Biiz) -35.97

Overall, only $5.07 more expensive for higher quality parts! Thanks to you guys! I really appreciate your help! If you spot any more room for improvement, please, let me know!

Here is the revised parts list:

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1hSeL
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1hSeL/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1hSeL/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Thermal Compound: Antec Formula 7 Nano Diamond 4g Thermal Paste ($11.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87MX-D3H Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($112.50 @ Newegg)
Memory: Wintec One 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.72 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($62.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Newegg)
Wireless Network Adapter: Rosewill RNX-N250PCe 802.11b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($19.95 @ Amazon)
Case: Apex PCV-588 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.98 @ Outlet PC)
Power Supply: Fractal Design Integra R2 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($68.00 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Pioneer BDC-207DBK Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($37.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($87.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VS229H-P 21.5" Monitor ($134.02 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: V7 CK0A1-4N6P Wired Standard Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($10.40 @ Amazon)
Other: 6ft DVI-D cable ($5.78)
Desk & Chair: x (?$50 @ Craigslist)
Total: $1169.24
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-18 01:40 EDT-0400)
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a b 4 Gaming
July 18, 2013 11:23:17 AM

Get this paste instead.
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/masscool-thermal-paste-g75...

One of the better and cheaper ones(does not give you as much as other but gives you enough) Buy 2 if you also want to switch out the paste of the GPU(not really needed as EVGA uses decent paste)

Also, the Monitor should have a DVI cord already
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