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Slow Write Speed

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  • Storage
  • Games
  • Speed
  • Hard Drives
Last response: in Storage
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July 19, 2013 9:24:24 AM

Hi. for the past 6 months or so my Hard drive has become really slow. I used Dxtory to test how fast my write speed was and it came out at 3mb on average. When i'm playing open world games like Skyrim, Fallout etc it has problems streaming textures and it jitters and sutters every once in awhile. Also for games my loading times are really bad! Is there any way to solve this low write speed? My Hard drive is a Western Digital Caviar Green WD10EARX 1 (1TB) SATA
Thanks.

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July 19, 2013 9:39:36 AM

Theassassin365 said:
Hi. for the past 6 months or so my Hard drive has become really slow. I used Dxtory to test how fast my write speed was and it came out at 3mb on average. When i'm playing open world games like Skyrim, Fallout etc it has problems streaming textures and it jitters and sutters every once in awhile. Also for games my loading times are really bad! Is there any way to solve this low write speed? My Hard drive is a Western Digital Caviar Green WD10EARX 1 (1TB) SATA
Thanks.


3mb is extremely slow, check the SMART to see if the hard drive is dying, check the disk for errors, and defrag the disk.
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July 19, 2013 9:56:56 AM

bob1033 said:
Theassassin365 said:
Hi. for the past 6 months or so my Hard drive has become really slow. I used Dxtory to test how fast my write speed was and it came out at 3mb on average. When i'm playing open world games like Skyrim, Fallout etc it has problems streaming textures and it jitters and sutters every once in awhile. Also for games my loading times are really bad! Is there any way to solve this low write speed? My Hard drive is a Western Digital Caviar Green WD10EARX 1 (1TB) SATA
Thanks.


3mb is extremely slow, check the to see if the hard drive is dying, check the disk for errors, and defrag the disk.


I used HD Tune and the Read speed was fine but I couldn't use the write speed test. It came up with the health of my hard drive and it came up with about 15 errors. Same saying the drive's sectors were damaged. There was also a Write error rate as well. And suggestions? I also used smart defrag and it said "No need to defrag"
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July 19, 2013 9:59:43 AM

You need to check your disk for errors, instructions are here. Make sure to chose the option Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors.
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a b G Storage
July 19, 2013 10:05:16 AM

I would start by backing up your data, if you have an available drive and have not done so already. Open up the Performance tab in Task Manager (Windows 8) and see how much of the time the drive is active and the transfer rate it is reporting to Windows. If the drive is active almost constantly, it could be any number of things, from bandwidth restrictions (we'll get to that) to malware. If the drive has a low transfer rate, it will be normal for it to be active more of the time. If something seems amiss, investigate it. You can open the resource monitor and see what processes are using the disk and how much. Google ones that are using an abnormal amount of bandwidth. Then, use either WD Data Lifeguard or something like Parted Magic to run a disk diagnostic. This will give you a very good idea of whether or not the drive is at risk of failing.

So far as updating firmware, that really doesn't apply in this case. WD only provides firmware on an as needed basis. Currently, there is no update for the Green drives on WD's website.

If the drive is healthy, you could try creating another partition, formatting it, and then seeing if there is a speed difference. If there is, then there is something wrong with the formatting on your current partition. I have only ever seen this happen on old machines with horribly fragmented drives, so I doubt this is the case for you. Next, you can try another SATA port on your motherboard, preferably one on another controller if possible. You may be unable to do this as in some cases a system will require the boot disk to be on a SATA port operated by a certain controller, usually the chipset, though most modern motherboards can boot from any of the onboard controllers. After you switch over the ports, run you disk utility and gauge your transfer speed. A major difference here can mean a controller problem, which can often be something as simple as drivers needing updated.
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July 19, 2013 12:22:34 PM

gbryan101 said:
I would start by backing up your data, if you have an available drive and have not done so already. Open up the Performance tab in Task Manager (Windows 8) and see how much of the time the drive is active and the transfer rate it is reporting to Windows. If the drive is active almost constantly, it could be any number of things, from bandwidth restrictions (we'll get to that) to malware. If the drive has a low transfer rate, it will be normal for it to be active more of the time. If something seems amiss, investigate it. You can open the resource monitor and see what processes are using the disk and how much. Google ones that are using an abnormal amount of bandwidth. Then, use either WD Data Lifeguard or something like Parted Magic to run a disk diagnostic. This will give you a very good idea of whether or not the drive is at risk of failing.

So far as updating firmware, that really doesn't apply in this case. WD only provides firmware on an as needed basis. Currently, there is no update for the Green drives on WD's website.

If the drive is healthy, you could try creating another partition, formatting it, and then seeing if there is a speed difference. If there is, then there is something wrong with the formatting on your current partition. I have only ever seen this happen on old machines with horribly fragmented drives, so I doubt this is the case for you. Next, you can try another SATA port on your motherboard, preferably one on another controller if possible. You may be unable to do this as in some cases a system will require the boot disk to be on a SATA port operated by a certain controller, usually the chipset, though most modern motherboards can boot from any of the onboard controllers. After you switch over the ports, run you disk utility and gauge your transfer speed. A major difference here can mean a controller problem, which can often be something as simple as drivers needing updated.


Well, I changed it to another port but it came up with a startup repair error. Any ideas why this has happened?
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a c 942 G Storage
July 19, 2013 12:36:33 PM

You need to backup your data and get a new drive asap before you lose it all.
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a b G Storage
July 19, 2013 12:55:58 PM

As for the start up error, it could be caused by the controller for that port not supporting a bootable drive, but it is more likely that the drive is simply failing. At this point, you need to back your data up. Put the drive back on the original port if need be. Your drive honestly sounds like it is dying. If you cannot boot to it, use a recovery environment to get your data. After you have your data, you can run a diagnostic on the disc, though I doubt it would tell you anything that you don't already know.

You have a very good chance of losing your data if you don't back up soon. If you cannot recover your data through the tools in a rescue environment, you can try something like Ddrescue. http://www.gnu.org/software/ddrescue/ddrescue.html

I personally would not try to create a clone of this disk for any purpose other than data recovery, even if it is still possible.
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July 19, 2013 5:10:33 PM

Thanks everybody for the help. I'm backing my hard drive up as we speak. I'll also try and get a new one ASAP.
Once again thanks :) 
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