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SSD compatibiity on Asus p5n-e-sli

Last response: in Motherboards
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July 20, 2013 5:29:44 AM

I am planning to buy an ssd and use it as a boot drive...
but i am not sure if it will work with my mother board.
I know that it doesnt support AHCI.

So will it work or not?

and if it will work then how big a performance loss will be there?...as in will the boot time go down significantly?? will app load times drop down?
Will i feel my pc is running on steriods?

PS- I have stock bios, other parts are - core 2 quad q6600, 6gb ram, gtx 650ti boost 2gb, and i have 2 sata hard drives
a c 135 V Motherboard
July 20, 2013 6:17:22 AM

U ll have the perfrmance of a sata ll drive with a sata lll drive so get a sata ll drive instead f wasting money on sata lll drive

SATA I (revision 1.x) interface, formally known as SATA 1.5Gb/s, is the first generation SATA interface running at 1.5 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 150MB/s.

SATA II (revision 2.x) interface, formally known as SATA 3Gb/s, is a second generation SATA interface running at 3.0 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 300MB/s.

SATA III (revision 3.x) interface, formally known as SATA 6Gb/s, is a third generation SATA interface running at 6.0Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 600MB/s. This interface is backwards compatible with SATA 3 Gb/s interface.

SATA II specifications provide backward compatibility to function on SATA I ports. SATA III specifications provide backward compatibility to function on SATA I and SATA II ports. However, the maximum speed of the drive will be slower due to the lower speed limitations of the port.

Example: SanDisk Extreme SSD, which supports SATA 6Gb/s interface and when connected to SATA 6Gb/s port, can reach up to 550/520MB/s sequential read and sequential write speed rates respectively. However, when the drive is connected to SATA 3 Gb/s port, it can reach up to 285/275MB/s sequential read and sequential write speed rates respectively.



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July 20, 2013 7:54:36 AM

Sn1992 said:
U ll have the perfrmance of a sata ll drive with a sata lll drive so get a sata ll drive instead f wasting money on sata lll drive

SATA I (revision 1.x) interface, formally known as SATA 1.5Gb/s, is the first generation SATA interface running at 1.5 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 150MB/s.

SATA II (revision 2.x) interface, formally known as SATA 3Gb/s, is a second generation SATA interface running at 3.0 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 300MB/s.

SATA III (revision 3.x) interface, formally known as SATA 6Gb/s, is a third generation SATA interface running at 6.0Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 600MB/s. This interface is backwards compatible with SATA 3 Gb/s interface.

SATA II specifications provide backward compatibility to function on SATA I ports. SATA III specifications provide backward compatibility to function on SATA I and SATA II ports. However, the maximum speed of the drive will be slower due to the lower speed limitations of the port.

Example: SanDisk Extreme SSD, which supports SATA 6Gb/s interface and when connected to SATA 6Gb/s port, can reach up to 550/520MB/s sequential read and sequential write speed rates respectively. However, when the drive is connected to SATA 3 Gb/s port, it can reach up to 285/275MB/s sequential read and sequential write speed rates respectively.






So you are saying it will work hassle free.... the only limitation being SATA II

What about AHCI???
Will i need to update my bios firmware?
My worst fear is buying it only to see that my pc wont detect it properly :/ ...please clarify
I knw about SATA II this but since i am planning to buy a new procy+mobo in some time ill go with Sata III to be future proof
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a c 135 V Motherboard
July 20, 2013 8:08:32 AM

Some operating systems, notably Windows Vista and Windows 7, do not configure themselves to load the AHCI driver upon boot if the SATA-drive controller was not in AHCI mode at the time of installation. This can cause failure to boot, with an error message, if the SATA controller is later switched to AHCI mode. For this reason, Intel recommends changing the drive controller to AHCI or RAID before installing an operating system.[1] (It may also be necessary to load chipset-specific AHCI or RAID drivers — from a USB flash drive, for example — at installation time.)
On Windows Vista and Windows 7, this can be fixed configuring the msahci device driver to start at boot time (rather than on-demand). Setting non-AHCI mode in the BIOS will allow the user to boot Windows, where the required registry change can be performed. The BIOS can then be changed to AHCI.[3]
On Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012, the name of the controller has changed from msahci to storahci,[4] and the procedure to upgrade to the new controller to it is similar to that of Windows 7.[5] On Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012, changing the SATA mode to AHCI without updating the registry will make the boot drive inaccessible.



Other than this u have to choose from ahci or sata or raid Intel reccomends raid mode


And no bios update for plugging sata in sata ll controller
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July 20, 2013 8:42:46 AM

Sn1992 said:
Some operating systems, notably Windows Vista and Windows 7, do not configure themselves to load the AHCI driver upon boot if the SATA-drive controller was not in AHCI mode at the time of installation. This can cause failure to boot, with an error message, if the SATA controller is later switched to AHCI mode. For this reason, Intel recommends changing the drive controller to AHCI or RAID before installing an operating system.[1] (It may also be necessary to load chipset-specific AHCI or RAID drivers — from a USB flash drive, for example — at installation time.)
On Windows Vista and Windows 7, this can be fixed configuring the msahci device driver to start at boot time (rather than on-demand). Setting non-AHCI mode in the BIOS will allow the user to boot Windows, where the required registry change can be performed. The BIOS can then be changed to AHCI.[3]
On Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012, the name of the controller has changed from msahci to storahci,[4] and the procedure to upgrade to the new controller to it is similar to that of Windows 7.[5] On Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012, changing the SATA mode to AHCI without updating the registry will make the boot drive inaccessible.



Other than this u have to choose from ahci or sata or raid Intel reccomends raid mode


And no bios update for plugging sata in sata ll controller


It does not have the option to switch to ahci...So i need to enable raid drivers
So what do i need to do while installing windows??my mobo doesnt support USB boot
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a c 135 V Motherboard
July 20, 2013 8:46:10 AM

Dont use raid it needs two or more drives

And my motive was to tell u the problems of ahci so its not wrth it

And do just the sata

Use ur crrnt drive and make ssd bootable and install a windows thru dvd
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July 20, 2013 8:51:13 AM

Sn1992 said:
Dont use raid it needs two or more drives

And my motive was to tell u the problems of ahci so its not wrth it

And do just the sata

Use ur crrnt drive and make ssd bootable and install a windows thru dvd



Many thanks m8!
So ill remove all other hard drives install win7 thru dvd on SSD and ill be good to go without any hiccups? :) 
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a c 135 V Motherboard
July 20, 2013 8:55:12 AM

Just make sure u make ssd bootable
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!