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Explain Adaptive Voltage

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July 21, 2013 3:38:01 PM

I have an i7 4770k cpu, and a z87 gryphon motherboard. When I set my frequency at 4ghz with 1,1 voltage (at manual) it's stable with aida for 20 minutes(Just how long i've tested it) so therefore I'm going to use that voltage as my "max"). But I can't get it to work with the adaptive voltage, probably because I dont understand how to use it and what the settings really mean.

When using adaptive voltage i set my turbo max to 1,1 volts, and i set the offset for 0.001(so the max would be 1,101 volts) and i do the same for the cache voltage.

When in windows it goes up to 1,169 in the beginning and after a while it goes down, to low volts like around 0.7 but it can go up sometimes and it will stay at 1,169 I believe when playing games like BF3.

It's like it completely ignores the numbers that i've set in. I've even tried putting 1.050 and it still goes to 1.169 for some reason.

And when I put the offset for 0.05 it goes over 1.2 i believe it actually gets at 1.219 and thats a precise 0.050 extra for 1.169, so there must be a connection.

Also there are some numbers just to the left for where you choose what mode you want to use for controlling the volts (auto, manual, offset and adaptive) and these numbers cannot be changed, it seems.
What do they mean?

I've watched guides for overclocking, but not for my specific mobo the asus GRYPHON z87 motherboard, which means the settings are very similiar but not 100%.

Does anybody know how to fix this issue of the voltage going over what i've set it to with ADAPTIVE mode, when it stays the same when using manual?

More about : explain adaptive voltage

a b à CPUs
August 30, 2013 5:36:34 PM

If it's adaptive it won't stay hence the word "adaptive." To adapt it will go to what it thinks it needs to be at to adapt to the workload it is experiencing. Here is the best definition to what it should do when it "adapts": http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/adapt?s=t

So ultimately adaptive voltage would mean to adpat the voltage to what is necessary or considered necessary to what it's programmed to according to how the device was made to handle certain work loads! You should be careful with messing with settings if you're not even sure of the terminology You could ruin your stuff my friend. Honestly when I am not sure of a term being used in conjunction with another I google what they mean separately by they're most original form for example "adaptive" is best searched as "adapt." In which case would give me a better understanding on how it may pertain to adapt to "voltage" when mentioned as "adaptive voltage."

If the system sets itself to a higher voltage during adaptive voltage it could be possible it's suggesting that you are under powering it for what you expect it to do. It's also possible you could ruin your stuff if you were to say set to manual and under power it for a long period of time under a load that requires more voltage if you were to experience faults, errors or any other unusual behavior it would not be surprising. This could be of use too hope all this helps: http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?33680-Beginner...
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a b à CPUs
August 30, 2013 5:51:41 PM

You need to remember that not only do you have to play with adaptive voltage in your BIOS, but the Haswell CPU has a built-in voltage regulator which does the same thing. Your settings in your BIOS are confusing the CPUs voltage regulator, they are in fact fighting each other for control of the voltage regulation.

I suggest you take a read at this and use Intel's tuning utility here.
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a b à CPUs
August 30, 2013 5:55:43 PM

GamerDad said:
You need to remember that not only do you have to play with adaptive voltage in your BIOS, but the Haswell CPU has a built-in voltage regulator which does the same thing. Your settings in your BIOS are confusing the CPUs voltage regulator, they are in fact fighting each other for control of the voltage regulation.

I suggest you take a read at this and use Intel's tuning utility here.


Agreed!
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November 20, 2013 5:57:53 AM

I have had the same problem, and I would just like to say here that in my case the minimum you can set the voltage limit to is 1.16V.
If you type in a lower number, the adaptive mode will run at 1.16V. Now, if I put in 1.17 or 1.18 for instance, then the limit works exactly as it is supposed to - it never goes above the set limit except when you do something like run Prime 95. On all games, applications and benchmark tests, the voltage never exceeds the set limit on adaptive mode. But these things seem to require a certain minimum voltage to work.

When I set the voltage manually, then of course it always stays on that max level.

So is there any way to change this behavior directly from the BIOS?
Or does one have to use that Intel software?

Furthermore, if I just leave it on manual, are there any problems with that? With such low voltage as 1.12V I wouldn't think so? Should not stress the CPU much?
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March 27, 2014 11:44:10 PM

Guys are you using asus boards, I set mine how the asus rep said to.

You dont set the target voltage, you set the offset value above the default.

eg. I set my adaptive offset to 0.05, I didnt touch anything else. It works exactly as expected aside from the voltage spiking on prime95, which the asus rep said is expected behaviour.
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