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Best value 16GB gaming RAM?

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July 21, 2013 8:17:37 PM

So I'm looking to get 16GB of RAM for my new gaming PC. I have this mobo:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I was wondering what a good set of RAM modules would be in terms of value and durability, and I plan to only do gaming and possibly some recording/video making down the road. Thanks in advance for any help.

More about : 16gb gaming ram

a b 4 Gaming
a b } Memory
July 21, 2013 8:34:17 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I have been using lots of Geil in the past years (and put some in my friends boxes). They are relatively new brand so they keep prices low and uptight quality control. They want to make a name for themselves. Till now I didn't have a problem with them.

http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/5047/geil_evo_leggera_...

They even have a reward or two.

Also forgot to mention:

Warranty

Limited Warranty period (parts): Lifetime
Limited Warranty period (labor): Lifetime

Good luck.
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July 21, 2013 8:44:59 PM

Shneiky said:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I have been using lots of Geil in the past years (and put some in my friends boxes). They are relatively new brand so they keep prices low and uptight quality control. They want to make a name for themselves. Till now I didn't have a problem with them.

http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/5047/geil_evo_leggera_...

They even have a reward or two.

Also forgot to mention:

Warranty

Limited Warranty period (parts): Lifetime
Limited Warranty period (labor): Lifetime

Good luck.

Is there any real difference between 2x8 and 4x4? and does the mobo I'm using effect what a good RAM set would be or does the mobo not really make a dif?
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a b 4 Gaming
a b } Memory
July 21, 2013 8:52:55 PM

Well not on your motherboard. Usually its better to use 2 or 4 sticks if your system is dual channel, 3 or 6 for triple channel and 4 or 8 sticks if it is quad channel (so basically 2 sticks on triple or quad channel will lead to few % loss of performance). But just basically the 4x4 kits are slightly less expensive.

Here is a 2 stick configuration:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If I were you, I would get the 2x8, so if needed in the future, you can just drop 2 more sticks in.
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a c 655 4 Gaming
a c 2198 } Memory
July 21, 2013 8:54:27 PM

Great mobo, that's what I have with my Z77 rig (in sig), I'd suggest GSkill 2x8GB the mobo will take about any set GSkill make (have tested about all of them from 2666 on down through the even some of the 1600 sets...with the video in there would suggest 2133 or 2400 if within the budget and prob the Tridents or Snipers
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July 21, 2013 9:03:56 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Great mobo, that's what I have with my Z77 rig (in sig), I'd suggest GSkill 2x8GB the mobo will take about any set GSkill make (have tested about all of them from 2666 on down through the even some of the 1600 sets...with the video in there would suggest 2133 or 2400 if within the budget and prob the Tridents or Snipers

I read on another thread that going beyond 1600mhz is basically a 1% performance difference for gaming. Is that true? I'm dead set on getting a EVGA GTX 770 ACX and I was told I could use 1866mhz and have no problems at all. Also, seems like anything beyond 1866mhz starts getting pretty pricey. If it makes a difference worth the cost then I'm interested, and vice versa.
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a c 655 4 Gaming
a c 2198 } Memory
July 21, 2013 9:07:01 PM

For gaming rigs I normally suggest 1866, but you had mentioned recording/making video, the recording not so much, but making and working with video, faster DRAM can help a lot, have a few pros that work with video for a living and they (as well as I) swear by faster sticks
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a b 4 Gaming
a b } Memory
July 21, 2013 9:07:43 PM

1600MHz with 9/9/9/24 timings is the gold middle. Getting to 1866 or up even with the same timings will even provide less than 1% in gaming.

I also do video editing, 3d and tons of rendering, but I don't swear by the fastest stick, I swear by the snappier stick. The stick's latency is as important as the MHz. 1600 9/9/9 is a reasonable middle that will not cost much. Better to go 1600 8/8/8 than 1866 9/9/9.
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a c 655 4 Gaming
a c 2198 } Memory
July 21, 2013 9:27:29 PM

Of the two, I'd go GSkill, more OC room, have used both...and as a note 1600/8 and 1866/9 are aon a par performance wise but the 1866 get the nod for the better of the two due to wider bandwidth for performance DRAM look to 1600/7 1866/8 2133/9 2400/10 2666/11

1600/9 is bear entry level for IB and Haswell
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July 21, 2013 9:35:04 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Of the two, I'd go GSkill, more OC room, have used both...and as a note 1600/8 and 1866/9 are aon a par performance wise but the 1866 get the nod for the better of the two due to wider bandwidth for performance DRAM look to 1600/7 1866/8 2133/9 2400/10 2666/11

1600/9 is bear entry level for IB and Haswell

How does RAM overclocking even work? I intend to OC my i3570k to 4.4, but I had never even considered messing with my RAM. Does overclocking RAM happen automatically when you mess with other components, or is it something you do separately for a different reason?

Also, semi-off topic: Does overclocking hurt longevity/lifespan of parts? I'd be pushing my CPU from 3.4 to 4.4 with water cooling but I'm hoping to get a good 3-4 years out of this PC. IS that a reasonable expectation?
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Best solution

a c 655 4 Gaming
a c 2198 } Memory
July 21, 2013 9:50:45 PM

First OCing DRAM in the true meaning is running sticks above their spec freq, i.e. taking 1866 sticks and running them at 2133 or whatever, many will say anything over 1600 is OCing the dRAM - those are the ones you DON't want to listen to as they don't know what they are talking about....if it's built to spec of 1866 how can you be OCing when running them at spec ;) ....

Off topic questions cost extra ;)  Can it...simple answer..Yes....better answer in truth, if done correctly and with good cooling...No....Good examples..the Q6600 (2.4 stock) was launched in about Jan of 2007 - many were excited saying it ought to OC to 3.0 GHz, I know of several I built still purring along from 3.6 to 4.0 and higher (many run 24/7....my 2500k is now a litle over 2.5 years old, don't think I've run it under 4.5 since the end of week 1, it's been 24/7 at 4.8 for over a year now, my 3570K is 4.7 24/7....and I expect both to be running for years, they'll go to my kids and/or their kids
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July 21, 2013 10:04:47 PM

Tradesman1 said:
First OCing DRAM in the true meaning is running sticks above their spec freq, i.e. taking 1866 sticks and running them at 2133 or whatever, many will say anything over 1600 is OCing the dRAM - those are the ones you DON't want to listen to as they don't know what they are talking about....if it's built to spec of 1866 how can you be OCing when running them at spec ;) ....

Off topic questions cost extra ;)  Can it...simple answer..Yes....better answer in truth, if done correctly and with good cooling...No....Good examples..the Q6600 (2.4 stock) was launched in about Jan of 2007 - many were excited saying it ought to OC to 3.0 GHz, I know of several I built still purring along from 3.6 to 4.0 and higher (many run 24/7....my 2500k is now a litle over 2.5 years old, don't think I've run it under 4.5 since the end of week 1, it's been 24/7 at 4.8 for over a year now, my 3570K is 4.7 24/7....and I expect both to be running for years, they'll go to my kids and/or their kids

Thanks for the knowledge :p  Picked your solution for the RAM details and "off topic" help :) 
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a c 655 4 Gaming
a c 2198 } Memory
July 21, 2013 10:09:25 PM

I'll be sending you the bill ;)  no seriously, let us know how everything goes!
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