Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question
Solved

Can I run a Radeon HD 4850 or 5770 with a 300W PSU?

Tags:
  • Radeon
  • Graphics Cards
  • HD
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics Cards
July 23, 2013 4:40:57 AM

Hi all, would I be able to run either of these two cards with a 300W PSU?

I have a fairly low power mobile CPU, Core Duo T2250 (30W) and a couple of hard drives, so that should leave plenty of power left right?

Any help with this would be much appreciated :) 

More about : run radeon 4850 5770 300w psu

a b U Graphics card
July 23, 2013 4:50:52 AM

I'm afraid you wont be able to, unless that power supply has a 6pin pci e power connector, it wont work, they both need one. I could introduce you to the nvidia gt640 2gb or an amd radeon HD 6670, they dont require a 6pin pci e x16 power connector.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
July 23, 2013 4:52:54 AM

Well, Its hard to say when you don't give any specifics on what power supply it is. Since the pc only came with a 300w psu and a mobile proc I doubt that psu is very good. Companies only put in the minimum PSU they need for the pc to run at max capacity and maybe account for capacitor aging. (degradation of the PSU, slightly)

Are you looking to buy a new gpu? If so I suggest a 7750 as that will almost assuredly work as it only requires 75w and no PCI-E power connectors.

That being said, does your PSU come with the proper connectors? (a 6pin) (don't get a 6pin mixed up with a 4+4pin as that is cpu, though a 6+2pin will work fine)
m
0
l
Related resources
July 23, 2013 4:55:10 AM

KieranDavidW123 said:
I'm afraid you wont be able to, unless that power supply has a 6pin pci e power connector, it wont work, they both need one. I could introduce you to the nvidia gt640 2gb or an amd radeon HD 6670, they dont require a 6pin pci e x16 power connector.


The PSU doesn't have any 6-pin pcie connectors, but I was thinking of using a molex to pcie adaptor. It should work, right?
m
0
l
July 23, 2013 5:06:53 AM

mouse24 said:
Well, Its hard to say when you don't give any specifics on what power supply it is. Since the pc only came with a 300w psu and a mobile proc I doubt that psu is very good. Companies only put in the minimum PSU they need for the pc to run at max capacity and maybe account for capacitor aging. (degradation of the PSU, slightly)

Are you looking to buy a new gpu? If so I suggest a 7750 as that will almost assuredly work as it only requires 75w and no PCI-E power connectors.

That being said, does your PSU come with the proper connectors? (a 6pin) (don't get a 6pin mixed up with a 4+4pin as that is cpu, though a 6+2pin will work fine)


The PSU is an FSP300-60EPN. It used to power an Athlon XP but I swapped it out for the Core Duo a few months ago.

Thanks for the advice, maybe it is time to get rid of that old PSU. :) 
m
0
l

Best solution

a b U Graphics card
July 23, 2013 6:44:57 AM

The Good: FSP makes a very good power supply

The Bad: That power supply is too old.

295w is the minimum recommended to run the parts you mentioned when the power supply is NEW. As they age PSUs lose their ability to deliver their rated power due to capacitor aging. This is accellerated if the cumputer is left on all the time.

Don't worry too much though, a modern 400w or 450w PSU is not too expensive and will have plenty of reserve to handle the parts you have specc'd.

Here's a nice 430w Corsair model for just $50. It has a PCIe connector, and it's even modular.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

*IF* you plan to upgrade anything else in the next 1-2 years, I'd suggest looking at a 500w or 600w model ($20-$30 more). A new CPU, RAM or motherboard will require a bit more power.
Share
a c 147 U Graphics card
July 23, 2013 7:39:48 AM

maddogfargo said:
The Good: FSP makes a very good power supply

Actually FSP makes a few good PSU's, a lot of average PSU's, and several
PSU's considered to be "Lemons"


The Bad: That power supply is too old.

295w is the minimum recommended to run the parts you mentioned when the power supply is NEW. As they age PSUs lose their ability to deliver their rated power due to capacitor aging. This is accellerated if the cumputer is left on all the time.

Don't worry too much though, a modern 400w or 450w PSU is not too expensive and will have plenty of reserve to handle the parts you have specc'd.

Here's a nice 430w Corsair model for just $50. It has a PCIe connector, and it's even modular.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

*IF* you plan to upgrade anything else in the next 1-2 years, I'd suggest looking at a 500w or 600w model ($20-$30 more). A new CPU, RAM or motherboard will require a bit more power.


m
0
l
July 23, 2013 11:30:40 AM

maddogfargo said:
The Good: FSP makes a very good power supply

The Bad: That power supply is too old.

295w is the minimum recommended to run the parts you mentioned when the power supply is NEW. As they age PSUs lose their ability to deliver their rated power due to capacitor aging. This is accellerated if the cumputer is left on all the time.

Don't worry too much though, a modern 400w or 450w PSU is not too expensive and will have plenty of reserve to handle the parts you have specc'd.

Here's a nice 430w Corsair model for just $50. It has a PCIe connector, and it's even modular.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

*IF* you plan to upgrade anything else in the next 1-2 years, I'd suggest looking at a 500w or 600w model ($20-$30 more). A new CPU, RAM or motherboard will require a bit more power.


Thanks man, so the PSU is definitely the achilles' heel then.

Cheers everyone :D 
m
0
l