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New To Overclocking (i7 - 2700k)

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July 24, 2013 4:31:52 PM

Hello, I have built my dream pc about 7 months ago, and am ready to over clock. I use programs like after effects and cinema 4d. I would like to over clock my Cpu to the 4.7Ghz area.

Specs:

Case: Cooler Master Storm Trooper
Mobo: MSI MPower Z77
Cpu: Intel i7 - 2700k
Ram: Corsair DDR3 Cl-10 16gb
Cooling: Corsair H100i
Ssd: Samsung pro 256Gb
Hdd: WD Blach 1tb
Psu: XFX 750w Silver
Gpu: Asus Gtx 670 2gb

I would like to know what settings i have to change and why (what they do). I know there are many many other threads on this. If there is a good one you know of please just link it to me. Other wise a list of the settings i have to change. I would like to keep hyper threading on. Thanks for your time!

More about : overclocking 2700k

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July 24, 2013 5:50:40 PM

also is there a way where it goes upto 4.7 automatically say when it needs it and drops down to a lower clock whjen not being stressed?
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a c 344 K Overclocking
July 24, 2013 6:04:30 PM

Speedstep basically does that for you, you want to achieve a stable OC with your CPU, then when not required speedstep will step things down - pop up CPU-Z and monitor it while doing things then let all go idle and watch it drop. With the 2700K try just setting it to 4.2 and boot, if it BSODS take the vCore (CPU voltage up a tad (say + 0.01) and try, if good there go to 4.3, and so on...just take things slow
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July 24, 2013 11:43:57 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Speedstep basically does that for you, you want to achieve a stable OC with your CPU, then when not required speedstep will step things down - pop up CPU-Z and monitor it while doing things then let all go idle and watch it drop. With the 2700K try just setting it to 4.2 and boot, if it BSODS take the vCore (CPU voltage up a tad (say + 0.01) and try, if good there go to 4.3, and so on...just take things slow


many poeple talk about c1e and vdroop and disabling stuff like intel turbo... do i need to do any of that if i want a 4.7 oc? and im sorry for being a noob, but "BSODS"? Thanks very much for your help!
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a c 344 K Overclocking
July 25, 2013 12:09:17 AM

BSOD = Blue Screen of Death - where it crashes at or soon after start, when OCing usually means not enough vCore (CPU voltage)...You can try as I suggested and see how far you can go with that, and read some guides, they'll help with the fine tuning and going higher, otherwise we may be back and forth forever, plus you'll be much happier with the rig and yourself doing it yourself...when you reach a wall hop back out here and ask, explain what you've done and seek opinions for fine tuning
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July 25, 2013 10:42:30 AM

Tradesman1 said:
BSOD = Blue Screen of Death - where it crashes at or soon after start, when OCing usually means not enough vCore (CPU voltage)...You can try as I suggested and see how far you can go with that, and read some guides, they'll help with the fine tuning and going higher, otherwise we may be back and forth forever, plus you'll be much happier with the rig and yourself doing it yourself...when you reach a wall hop back out here and ask, explain what you've done and seek opinions for fine tuning


k, thank you
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July 25, 2013 10:50:54 AM

The main question is just all the settings i should know about if i plan to reach 4.7... I will stick with your method, and thanks for all your help!
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July 25, 2013 11:51:12 AM

WAIT! do i do voltage offset or a set voltage!?!?
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a c 150 K Overclocking
July 25, 2013 12:02:14 PM

hiporc said:
WAIT! do i do voltage offset or a set voltage!?!?


Offset voltage if you want to run through a lot of trial and error, however your CPU will lower it's voltage at lower clocks (ex: 1.6ghz @1.16v and then 4.7ghz @1.37V. Or fixed which is the easy route, which will run your CPU at a fixed voltage (1.6ghz @1.37V and 4.7ghz @1.37V) regardless of the clock speed.
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a c 344 K Overclocking
July 25, 2013 2:42:57 PM

Can go either way, using offset is the way I normally go, less power consumption, but the static/fixed is the way most beginners start out, once comfortablye with the whole concept then might want to play with offset
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July 25, 2013 8:08:13 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Can go either way, using offset is the way I normally go, less power consumption, but the static/fixed is the way most beginners start out, once comfortablye with the whole concept then might want to play with offset


how is it more difficult to do offset?
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a c 344 K Overclocking
July 25, 2013 8:58:25 PM

Can take longer to find an effective one for a given OC, and with offset, you may think you've hit the wall, when in fact you haven't, take a 3570K, may take very little to move up through 4, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 etc maybe just 0.01 or so, then you go to hit 4.6 (or whatever and at 0.05 or what ever 0.02 doesn't, help, 0.04 doesn't do it, then you find it requires a monster leap from the previous
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July 26, 2013 10:25:58 AM

Tradesman1 said:
Can take longer to find an effective one for a given OC, and with offset, you may think you've hit the wall, when in fact you haven't, take a 3570K, may take very little to move up through 4, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 etc maybe just 0.01 or so, then you go to hit 4.6 (or whatever and at 0.05 or what ever 0.02 doesn't, help, 0.04 doesn't do it, then you find it requires a monster leap from the previous


Im just wondering how it would be harder that a constant voltage... if you are just casually stepping up the voltages with both. How would offset be harder? What i am seeing is that you are saying just random walls in voltages? Why would that be only with offset though?
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July 26, 2013 1:23:14 PM

LAST QUESTION! What voltage should i not exceed if i want this to be a 24/7 over clock? Also what temperature is safe for a 24/7 over clock?
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a c 344 K Overclocking
July 26, 2013 3:39:29 PM

Each will be different, best thing is to monitor your temps as you go, I like to keep them in the low to mid 30s, others don't mind low 40s
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July 26, 2013 5:47:15 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Each will be different, best thing is to monitor your temps as you go, I like to keep them in the low to mid 30s, others don't mind low 40s


WTF? you using a liquid nitrogen cooler? or at idle? I just wanted to know what voltage i should limit my self to for a 24/7 overclock... and i was reading a different fourm... he said mid 70's would be where you should aim. I just wanted to get a second opinion on that. You say 30? at load right now mine is at 50 stock. Are you sure that is the core temp and not the socket? Ill give you best answer if you can give me a voltage limit and temp limit for a 24/7 OC. Thanks again for your help!
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a c 344 K Overclocking
July 26, 2013 5:58:37 PM

At idle, am thinking about 1.26-7 for 4.4-4.5, depending on CPU (your particular CPU, they all differ a little), maybe 1.34-7 for around 4.7/8, vCore tend to jump more after 4.4-4.5
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July 26, 2013 7:48:24 PM

Tradesman1 said:
At idle, am thinking about 1.26-7 for 4.4-4.5, depending on CPU (your particular CPU, they all differ a little), maybe 1.34-7 for around 4.7/8, vCore tend to jump more after 4.4-4.5


so 1.4v and 75c a good limit for a 24/7 overclock? higher? lower?
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a c 344 K Overclocking
July 26, 2013 8:11:53 PM

I'd like lower but all depends on the rig, no two are alike, I've had rigs where a a client wants say 5 identical systems (component wise) and set up to 4.4 or what ever and all end up with different voltages and temps that vary, everything these day has such tight tolerances, one just can say a magic voltage figure or temp.....sorry ;) 
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July 26, 2013 10:31:12 PM

Tradesman1 said:
I'd like lower but all depends on the rig, no two are alike, I've had rigs where a a client wants say 5 identical systems (component wise) and set up to 4.4 or what ever and all end up with different voltages and temps that vary, everything these day has such tight tolerances, one just can say a magic voltage figure or temp.....sorry ;) 


I know that all chips will vary in how hot they get and how much voltage they will need to be stable. I was just looking for a number i should not cross for both voltage and temperature if i am doing a 24/7 oc. just two plain numbers for both.
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a c 344 K Overclocking
July 26, 2013 11:11:36 PM

As stated, depends on the system, there is no set in stone numbers, sorry.....
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July 27, 2013 12:45:34 AM

Tradesman1 said:
As stated, depends on the system, there is no set in stone numbers, sorry.....


so you are saying the maximum temperature i should not exceed is steeply different for every processor. and that the voltage i "should" not cross for a 24/7 oc is different for all??? I know that the voltage needed to make a stable oc for each processor is different and that one processor may short our at 95, and another at 105. I was just looking for a boundary. "like dont use more tank 1.***v as that will shorten the life of "most" processors" and "for a 24/7 over clock you dont want your processor to run hotter than **c, because that will also shorten the life for "most" processors."

I know you can't tell me my exact specific numbers for my exact specific processor. The 2700k has been around for ages and many tests have been done on it. Just would like to know a healthy voltage and temp to be running at for a 24/7 oc.

Sorry for being anal and difficult. Im not asking you for a maximum over clock. nor asking what my temps will be if i run it at a certain volt. Im just asking when does it start to get bad for most sandy bridge processors.

Fill in the *'s "Stay below 1.***v, and do not go over **C, if you are doing a 24/7 oc."

Fill that in, and best answer is yours.
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a c 150 K Overclocking
July 27, 2013 1:01:07 AM

Stay below 1.4V (Unless you are on custom watercooling) and do not go over 85-90C, if you are doing a 24/7 oc
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Best solution

a c 224 K Overclocking
July 27, 2013 3:24:30 AM

hiporc said:
I was just looking for a number i should not cross for both voltage and temperature if i am doing a 24/7 oc. just two plain numbers for both.


1.52v is Intels tested limit on the Sandy Bridge CPU so that's your line not to cross, I'm kinda curious as to why 4.7ghz is your target as even though it's very reachable the 2700K literally screams at 4.5ghz and you can do that in the 1.295v ~ 1.305v range plus or minus, depending on the quality of your 2700K.

With the cooling you have temperature wise for longevity stay peaking at a gaming load of under 60c if your cooling does that for you, stress testing for stability may take you above that, but you don't stress test 24/7, so don't sweat it.

I use fixed voltage myself as it is best to use for the higher overclocks around the 5ghz range which your 2700K should be able to reach, but I'm not sure regarding your cooling capabilities.

If you shoot for a 4.5ghz clock and arrive at stability, then you'll learn a lot to get there which will help you when you venture into the higher clocks and you probably will once you get a taste of the performance, and learn more about what you're doing, but keeping it cool is a priority.

The 1.40v that's commonly tossed around at THGF is supposedly the best for long term use, it is commonly suggested to stay below that, but 1.52v is actually Intels tested M/B spike peak, so a voltage spike out in the operation system to maintain a stable high clock is totally acceptable as far as Intel is concerned.

Now that you have that information I strongly urge you to study the overclocking guides, there are various ways to approach overclocking your 2700K, you can use all the throttling capabilities, or some of the throttling capabilities, or run all the cores flat out, different guides will allow different ways and approaches to overclocking.

You need to decide what overclocking approach you'll be taking and study the guide that will get you there.

There are some here and across the net you can Google.




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