Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Overclocking reduce the CPU lifetime

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
July 26, 2013 6:35:52 AM

Hello everyone!
I know that OCing is reducing the lifetime of CPU, but
I would like to know if OC will reduce the lifetime of my i7 3770K, because as i know, K series are for Overclocking, aren't they?
My motherboard is Z77 Mpower [MSI says it made for OCing]
And my cooler is noctua nh-d14. It keeps temperature of the CPU under 40 C even if it already Overclocked! Also the board can OC it automaticly

so will it reduce the lifetime or not?

Best solution

a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
July 26, 2013 6:43:56 AM

rocker19943 said:
Hello everyone!
I know that OCing is reducing the lifetime of CPU, but
I would like to know if OC will reduce the lifetime of my i7 3770K, because as i know, K series are for Overclocking, aren't they?
My motherboard is Z77 Mpower [MSI says it made for OCing]
And my cooler is noctua nh-d14. It keeps temperature of the CPU under 40 C even if it already Overclocked! Also the board can OC it automaticly

so will it reduce the lifetime or not?


Short answer, yes. Overclocking anything by the terminology itself, means to run the hardware beyond it's stock specifications. With the right control, ie. Cooler, airflow you can negate some of the effects of the OC and reduction of life span. With that said, each chip is different, and you may get 5 years out of a chip instead of 6, so it doesn't really make that much difference, specially as nowadays most people tend to upgrade every 3 years or so.

To illustrate better, I've a 25% OC on my q6600 it runs at 3ghz flat and has done for over 5 years. It runs flawlessly :)  But I may only get another year out of it instead of maybe 2 because I've had it overclocked. Still rest assured I've gotten my money's worth and am not concerned. :) 


edit : The 'k' designation, really just means that you can overclock, in respect to the lifespan, being able to OC doesn't mean you should. Your 3770k is plenty powerful for every task, so sometimes OC'ing isn't required, and in your case I would say that's very true.
Share
a b à CPUs
July 26, 2013 6:44:56 AM

if you are letting the board overclock it, odds are it is not being pushed too hard. you wont have to worry about the lifespan being cut down unless you oc the chip really hard, say like 4.7+ ghz. and even then, with the right cooling you don't have to worry.

with your case, the life of the processor should not be affected.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b à CPUs
July 26, 2013 6:56:36 AM

Your temps are good so I wouldn't worry if I were you. But unfortunately, your question is impossible to answer. Nobody knows for sure how much difference in lifetime it makes to OC or not, especially since all systems are different and also used differently by each user, and also overclocked differently by each user, etc... Bottom line is, you'll probably replace the whole system way before the CPU dies.
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
a c 79 à CPUs
July 26, 2013 7:21:56 AM

Ovrclocking isn't the problem. It's the heat.

There's a rule of thumb used by engineers... 'For every 5c cooler you can run an electrical part you will approximately double it's lifespan.'

So basically, the cooler you keep it the longer it will last. And the Noctua NHD14 cooler you're using is very capable, so no worries. ;) 
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
July 26, 2013 7:56:22 AM

rocker19943 said:
Hello everyone!
I know that OCing is reducing the lifetime of CPU, but
I would like to know if OC will reduce the lifetime of my i7 3770K, because as i know, K series are for Overclocking, aren't they?
My motherboard is Z77 Mpower [MSI says it made for OCing]
And my cooler is noctua nh-d14. It keeps temperature of the CPU under 40 C even if it already Overclocked! Also the board can OC it automaticly

so will it reduce the lifetime or not?

If you are not raising the voltage or frequency to the point of causing causing excessive heat build up, then you are not hurting anything. Someone suggested the lifespan could maybe be like from 6 years to 5, its more like from 125 years to maybe 90 years. Point is, unless you are trying to get crazy numbers, the processor will still most likely last longer than you will. I have a 300mhz Celeron-A running at 450mhz, and its been doing it for 15 years without a hiccup.
m
0
l
!