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Will an Intel RTS2011LC be sufficient to cool down Core i7 3970X processor with a TDP of 150W. Cooler supports upto 130W TDP?'

The picture which shows the box/labelling says that the cooler supports upto **130W** TDP processor.

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1707/

How accurate is this?

Will it be safe if I use this cooler, even though the TDP of the i7 3970X is 150W.

Are these two compatible? Has anybody run a similar setup like this successfully?

Please advise.
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about intel rts2011lc sufficient cool core 3970x processor tdp 150w cooler supports upto 130w tdp
  1. Best answer
    I will quote what Tom's said about this:

    "Cooling is a naturally an important consideration, then. Intel says that its RTS2011AC air cooler, which sells for just under $30, is not sufficient for the Core i7-3970X. However, the RTS2011LC closed-loop thermal solution we’ve been using for testing is able to handle 150 W CPUs. Since many vendors don’t get specific about their thermal performance, you’ll need to check with your vendor of choice about compatibility. And because Intel doesn't ship its LGA 2011-based models with coolers, plan on spending $70 to $80 more for something appropriate."

    From http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-3970x-sandy-bridge-e-benchmark,3348.html

    So I would say you will be fine, at stock clocks of the 3970X.

    The 3970X really isn't much more power hungry than the 130W TDP chips, Xbitlabs said that the main reason for the TDP increase is to make room for even faster chips for the 2011 platform eventually:

    "Of course, if you feel like shocking anyone with your power consumption numbers, then maximum load is the way to go. This is where Core i7-3970X is the one and only leader. Its power consumption is so high that it not only puts the system with AMD FX-8350 to shame, but also more than doubles the power readings of the LGA 1155 configuration with a Core i7-3770K. However, the power consumption difference between the system with the new Core i7-3970X and the system with the Core i7-3960X still doesn’t reach 20 W – only 12 W. In other words, the newly declared TDP have some reserves for yet another frequency boost allowing for even faster six-core Sandy Bridge-E processor to come out one day."
  2. Maxx_Power said:
    I will quote what Tom's said about this:

    "Cooling is a naturally an important consideration, then. Intel says that its RTS2011AC air cooler, which sells for just under $30, is not sufficient for the Core i7-3970X. However, the RTS2011LC closed-loop thermal solution we’ve been using for testing is able to handle 150 W CPUs. Since many vendors don’t get specific about their thermal performance, you’ll need to check with your vendor of choice about compatibility. And because Intel doesn't ship its LGA 2011-based models with coolers, plan on spending $70 to $80 more for something appropriate."

    From http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-3970x-sandy-bridge-e-benchmark,3348.html

    So I would say you will be fine, at stock clocks of the 3970X.


    +1 to this solution
  3. If you bought one of the most expensive, fastest performing and most power hungry prcessors on the market, why not go ahead and grab a Corsair H100i or H110 at least?
  4. Dont get a intel solution fr cooling it is just at par with h60
    Get a nzxt x40 which is better than h90
  5. This is like buying an 800 horsepower engine and sticking a 10 year old mini-van's transmission with it.
  6. I have a midtower case, and both those coolers take too much space too fit in properly

    Cpt Underpants said:
    If you bought one of the most expensive, fastest performing and most power hungry prcessors on the market, why not go ahead and grab a Corsair H100i or H110 at least?
  7. Nzxt kraken x40 will fit a case with 140mm
    What case you have ???
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