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Does converting videos causes RAM or graphic card to go faulty?

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July 26, 2013 7:53:38 AM

Hi, I just want to know whether converting videos affect the RAM and graphic card of a PC.
Over the past few years, I have been facing some issues with my PC. Lots of bluescreen. DELL would just come and change my RAM and everything would be fine.
And can somebody tell me what causes a faulty RAM and graphic card and some of it symptoms ?
Thank You
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July 26, 2013 8:15:28 AM

What application are you using to convert videos?

I can't think of any way the actual conversion process could damage hardware, but heat (and/or poor power) could. Video encoding/rendering, etc, especially when using the GPU to off-load some of those processing chores, can raise the operating temperature of the system quite a bit, as well as putting a strain on the PSU.

What are the specs (or model of your Dell) for your system?
July 26, 2013 10:31:12 PM

Studio XPS 9100
Intel (R) Core(TM) i7-930 Processor (2.8GHz, 8MB)
1GB ATI Radeon HD5670

Is this enough?
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July 27, 2013 5:59:05 PM

What application are you using to convert videos?
July 27, 2013 8:35:15 PM

Any Video Converter
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July 27, 2013 9:33:14 PM

The conversion process itself no, the power required may have effect on components, especially if they are using things like cheap DRAM or a cheap PSU which isn't feeding enough power
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July 28, 2013 5:56:29 PM

What are you operating temperatures for your CPU and GPU at idle and under load (like when converting video)?
July 31, 2013 8:40:18 AM

The GPU temperature when idle will start from 44 - 56
When converting, around 55- 60

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July 31, 2013 8:54:41 AM

Pop the cover off you case and run again. How hot does it get then?
August 2, 2013 7:03:27 AM

Well, im putting a small fan beside the cpu.
Temp is 52-55 when idle
Not more than 60 when converting
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August 2, 2013 8:04:47 AM

If Dell, would look at replacing the CPU fan and/or possibly the PSU - 52-55 is too high at idle at will be heating up everything else
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August 2, 2013 8:46:38 AM

I agree with Tradesman1, this really does sound like a heat issue. When was the last time the innards of this rig was cleaned?
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August 2, 2013 10:19:35 AM

StephenNg said:
Well, im putting a small fan beside the cpu.
Temp is 52-55 when idle
Not more than 60 when converting


Are you talking about CPU or GPU temps here?

This is your PC



And this is your CPU cooler



It uses screw down system - there is a backplate. Question is, what LGA size Dell uses here. I know for fact that Dell Inspirons (all of them) are using LGA775, for XPS I have no clue.
August 4, 2013 7:15:07 AM

What' a LGA?
Not a pro on computers
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August 4, 2013 9:29:49 AM

StephenNg said:
What' a LGA?
Not a pro on computers


This question was mostly to Toms regulars.

This question was to you

Quote:
Are you talking about CPU or GPU temps here?


What is overheating?
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August 4, 2013 3:38:31 PM

Sounds like the CPU is the problem from previous comments in the thread. LGA is just part of the Socket 775 name.

How dirty is the inside of the system? Also, do any of the caps around the CPU (look like small cylinders standing upright) look misshapen or swollen?
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August 5, 2013 9:55:18 AM

COLGeek said:
Sounds like the CPU is the problem from previous comments in the thread. LGA is just part of the Socket 775 name.


The problem is - Dell uses certain LGA CPU cooler for simplicity and to cut costs. For an example, all Inspiron line from Inspiron 530 to Inspiron 660 is using LGA775 with backplate.
XPS can be different. The point is, if after market cooler is to be used, we need to know what size is mounting.

Best solution

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August 5, 2013 10:08:38 AM
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Looking at the Studio XPS 9100 service manual, it appears that this model uses a standard LGA1366 footprint/mount for the heatsink. I would think a standard Socket 1366 heatsink would fit this system, especially something like the mount used by a CM Hyper 212 + or EVO uses.
August 9, 2013 6:34:08 AM

So, overheating is most probably the problem?
Will check the insides later
Still don't know what is a LGA
Can you guys recommend me what to do after my warranty expires to improve cooling?
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August 9, 2013 6:59:48 AM

I would swap the current Dell CPU Heatsink/Fan assembly and replace with a more effective and efficient aftermarket unit. Something like a CM Hyper 212 EVO.

LGA refers to the CPU socket type and the mounting holes around the CPU itself (that the heatsink mounts to) on the motherboard.
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August 9, 2013 8:27:51 AM

How can a Core i7 930 fit into an LGA 775? That board is LGA 1366. If the RAM is going faulty then it could be due to heat inside the case or some voltage issue with the motherboard. A Hyper 212 EVO would help. It would pull air over the ram and push it out the back of the case if it is a heat related issue.

If this doesn't solve the problem I'd ask Dell for a new motherboard. The kicker here is the video card going fault. It could be due to bad power delivery from the motherboard but also from the power supply. It could be due to heat but it's such an underpowered card that I doubt it.
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August 9, 2013 8:45:24 AM

ElmoIsEvil is right. This is a socket 1356 mobo. We got off track earlier when the LGA775 reference was made. Still an i7 in a socket 1356 mobo that appears to use a standard mount.

I don't think we have a GPU heating/power issue. The symptoms (while possible) don't point that way. I think the tool being used renders mainly with the CPU vice the GPU.

The motherboard could have bad caps, that is true, thus the questions earlier to look at that.

The Dell PSU is also suspect, but powering this rig shouldn't be an issue given the components in use.
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August 9, 2013 8:48:39 AM

LGA = Land Grid Array

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_Grid_Array

Description

The land grid array is a packaging technology with a square grid of contacts on the underside of a package. The contacts are to be connected to a grid of contacts on the PCB. Not all rows and columns of the grid need to be used. The contacts can either be made by using an LGA socket, or by using solder paste.

LGA packaging is related to ball grid array (BGA) and pin grid array (PGA) packaging. Unlike pin grid arrays, land grid array packages are designed to fit both in a socket or be soldered down using surface mount technology. PGA packages cannot be soldered down using surface mount technology. In contrast with a BGA, land grid array packages in non socketed configurations have no balls and use a flat contact which is soldered directly to the PCB and BGA packages have balls as their contacts in between the IC and the PCBs
August 10, 2013 6:50:11 AM

Hey, so Im getting freezes and BSODs now. Do you mind me posting it so you guys can have a look?
And how do I post it?

And there's a message on my windows saying :
PCIExpress has stopped working properly.
At this time, we don't know the exact cause of this problem. Hewlett-Packard is interested in gathering additional feedback.

What is a PCIExpress?
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August 12, 2013 6:55:14 PM

COLGeek said:
LGA = Land Grid Array

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_Grid_Array

Description

The land grid array is a packaging technology with a square grid of contacts on the underside of a package. The contacts are to be connected to a grid of contacts on the PCB. Not all rows and columns of the grid need to be used. The contacts can either be made by using an LGA socket, or by using solder paste.

LGA packaging is related to ball grid array (BGA) and pin grid array (PGA) packaging. Unlike pin grid arrays, land grid array packages are designed to fit both in a socket or be soldered down using surface mount technology. PGA packages cannot be soldered down using surface mount technology. In contrast with a BGA, land grid array packages in non socketed configurations have no balls and use a flat contact which is soldered directly to the PCB and BGA packages have balls as their contacts in between the IC and the PCBs


I think I was misunderstood in relation to LGA.

What I meant is this - mounting holes size. Back to Inspirons. Inspiron included LGA775, and AM2 to AM3 (for AMD processors), latest Inspiron 660 has LGA1155 socket, but still uses LGA775 mounting size holes. I am not saying anything about socket itself, but about size between mounting holes, you can not use anything like CM EVO because motherboard back plate has to be removed in this case, or a lot of improvisation would be needed.

This is the type of cooler needed in this situation



http://www.redplanettrading.com/Dell-P281K-Fan-Heatsink...

Now OP might need aftermarket, similar type and exact size (distance between screws).

This can be the one if LGA1166 is the correct mounting size (again not motherboard socket, but a backplate size)



Noctua NH-U9DX 1366 Dual Heat-pipe SSO Bearing Quiet CPU Cooler
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Or similar with screws already attached to the cooler.
I hope I made myself more clear now.

Quote:
Hey, so Im getting freezes and BSODs now. Do you mind me posting it so you guys can have a look?
And how do I post it?


Can you post BSOD error message - very long string of numbers, this might help.
In order to post pictures you have to get an account at image hosting site, I am using imageshack for an example.

Your turn now.
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